Local Heart, Global Soul

January 9, 2016

500 Years And Many Of The Meanings Are Still A Mystery…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

It seems like I have all the time in the world and none at all.

Simple tasks take me a ridiculous amount of time and wear me out, and with low concentration I often make stupid mistakes that mean things need to be done again.

I’m a “doer” in character so find the days where I just don’t get anything done a total frustration, but I also realise that if I’m taking extra pain relief that causes drowsiness to get on top of pain that refuses to subside, that staying awake is a near impossibility and I would drop where I stood if I didn’t go lay down.

I’ve fallen asleep countless times on the sofa whilst trying to do a simple sitting down task, I’ve also napped in waiting rooms and a few times even whilst seated on the loo!

It took me weeks to write my Christmas newsletter and even longer to put labels on envelopes and send them. It’s the first time ever that I’ve been so behind that I sent them in the first week of the New Year! I’m hoping that recipients will forgive me and say “better late than never”. Himself went out for stamps and because the postal shop didn’t have enough of the denomination for International postage, got a lower denomination that I could use two of instead. Having studied Art History and Practical Art I was delighted to see that the stamps he bought home were in celebration of the 500th Anniversary of The Dutch artist known as Jheronimus Bosch.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Wikipedia (links below) tells us: “Hieronymus Bosch was born Jheronimus (or Joen,respectively the Latin and Middle Dutch form of the name “Jerome”) van Aken (meaning “from Aachen”). He signed a number of his paintings as Jheronimus Bosch. The name derives from his birthplace, ‘s-Hertogenbosch, which is commonly called “Den Bosch” (‘the forest’).

Little is known of Bosch’s life or training. Bosch’s date of birth has not been determined with certainty but is estimated at c. 1450 on the basis of a hand drawn portrait (which may be a self-portrait) made shortly before his death in 1516. The drawing shows the artist at an advanced age, probably in his late sixties.

Bosch was born and lived all his life in and near ‘s-Hertogenbosch, a city in the Duchy of Brabant. His grandfather, Jan van Aken (died 1454), was a painter and is first mentioned in records in 1430. It is known that Jan had five sons, four of whom were also painters. In 1463, 4,000 houses in the town were destroyed by a catastrophic fire, which the then (approximately) 13-year-old Bosch presumably witnessed.  He became a popular painter in his lifetime and often received commissions from abroad. In 1488 he joined the highly respected Brotherhood of Our Lady, an arch-conservative religious group of some 40 influential citizens of ‘s-Hertogenbosch, and 7,000 ‘outer-members’ from around Europe.

Sometime between 1479 and 1481, Bosch married Aleyt Goyaerts van den Meerveen. The couple moved to the nearby town of Oirschot, into an inherited house and land from her wealthy family. An entry in the accounts of the Brotherhood of Our Lady, records Bosch’s death in 1516.

Bosch produced at least sixteen triptychs, of which eight are fully intact, and another five in fragments. His most famous triptych is the “The Garden of Earthly Delights”. These stamps however, depict not his most famous painting but another famous triptych, a part of the central secton of “The Haywain Triptych“.

Much debate goes on between scholars when interpreting the meaning behind Bosch’s works, some using modern day interpretations and others arguing for interpretations that would have been relevant and imagery known in Bosch’s time.
I have used some of these stamps on my Christmas correspondence, and included the text that went with each one… of course no single letter had the complete set of stamps and only my Father was in the International posting pile who reads Dutch, so I have done my best to translate each of the texts here below (with the corresponding Dutch so that people will see which piece they have and how the stamps fit together with one another).

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

What is undisputed is that Bosch was very concerned with the issues of morality: greed, corruption and the worthlessness of earthly wealth… Let’s see what the Stamp texts tell us and try and draw our own conclusions:

” 500 JAAR JHERONIMUS BOSCH.

Heel 2016 wordt herdacht dat de geniale schilder in 1516 stierf te ‘s-Hertogenbosch. Zijn fantasie en vebeeldingkracht zijn evolutionair en inspirerend tot in onze tijd.

“De Hooiwagen” schilderde hij tegen het eind van zijn leven. Dit drieluik is onderdeel van de tentoonstelling Jheronimus Bosch – Visioenen van en genie in Het Noordbrabants Museum, hoogepunt in het herdenkingjaar.”

500 YEARS Hieronymus Bosch.
Throughout 2016 we commemorate the genius painter who died in 1516 in ‘s-Hertogenbosch. His fantasy and imagination are evolutionary and inspiring even in our time. “The Haywain Triptych” was painted by him towards the end of his life. This triptych is part of the exhibition Hieronymus Bosch – Visions of genius and located in the Noordbrabants Museum, is a high point in his commemorative year.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Bosch schildert een menigte mensen die waardeloos hooi najagen. Een kreupele pelgrim heeft het al te paaken. Zijn vrouw bidt dat goed zal aflopen voor hen en hun kind.”

Bosch depicts a crowd of people chasing worthless hay that has no value. A crippled pilgrim has already grabbed some hay. His wife prays that all will end well for them and their child.

“Iedereen probeert wat hooi te bemachtigen terwijl de wagen verder rijdt. Bosch laat zien dat hebzucht mensen agressief maakt en dat kan zelfs tot moord en doodslag leiden.”

Everyone is trying to get some hay while the wagon drives away. Bosch shows that greed makes people aggressive and can even lead to murder and manslaughter..

“Uit Jheronimus Bosch kritiek op de Kerk? Twee monniken zijn met mannen en vrouwen rond de hooiwagen slaags geraakt. Ook zij wilden zoveel mogelijk hooi te pakken krijgen.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Was Hieronymus Bosch being critical of the Church? Two monks clash with men and women around the hay wagon. They too wanted to get as much hay as possible for themselves.

“Nauwkeurig schildert Bosch het spaakwiel van de zwaarbeladen hooiwagen. Zelfs de nagels waarmee het wiel is beslagen zijn weergegeven. Het loopt slecht af als je door die wagen wordt overreden.”

Bosch paints with great accuracy the spoked wheel of the heavily laden hay wagon. Even the nails with which the wheels are attached are displayed in detail. It would be a terrible fate to get run over by that hay wagon. (maybe this is an annology about the perils of greed?)

“Bosch op zijn best: onbestaanbare gedrochten schildert hij om het kwaad in de wereld weer te geven. Deze bende trekt de hooiwagen voort, regelrecht richting hel.”

Bosch at his best: Again with his non-existent monsters he depicts the evil in the world. This gang pulls the hay wagon on, straight to hell.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Een vermoeide pelgrim en een kind als miniatuurbedevaartganger. De moeder met een kind aan haar rokken merkt hen niet op. Wat moeten ze daar, op weg waarheen?”

A weary pilgrim and a child depicted as a miniature pilgrim. Mother has a child clinging to her skirts but does not notice them. Why are they here and where are they going?

“Een zwijnskop aan het spit, een ander varkentje wacht op zijn beurt. De Vrowen op de voorgrond weten van niets, maar het vuur dat Jheronimus Bosch schildert, is venijnig heet.”

A boar’s head roasts on a spit, another pig stands awaiting for his turn. The women in the foreground don’t know ir, but the fire that Hieronymus Bosch has painted, is viciously hot.

“De vrouw moet wanhopig zijn van de pijn. Het halssnoer met getrokken tanden dat de kwakzalver om heeft gehangen, werkt net zo weinig vertrouwen als zijn met hooi gevulde beurs.”
The woman must be desperate pain. The necklace with extracted teeth that quack has hung around her neck, works with just as much confidence as his purse filled with hay.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Het snerpend geluid van de doedelzakspeler lokt zelfs een kloosterzuster. Is die worst te koop voor een handvol hooi? Bosch is altijd dubbelzinning.”

The grinding sound of the bagpipe player even lures a nun. Is this sausage on sale for a handful of hay? Bosch is always ambiguous.

“Bosch laat zien dat ook paters en nonnen gehecht zijn aan aardse goederen. De baal met hooi is al mooi gevuld, de beker drank zo goed als leeg.”

Bosch shows that even priests and nuns are attached to earthly goods. The bale of hay is already pretty well filled up and the drink in the cup is as good as empty.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The round central stickers say:
500 Jaar Jheronimus Bosch ,2016, Nederland (500 Years of Jheronimus Bosch, 2016, The Netherlands).
Wikipedia: “The Haywain Triptych”  (Dutch language).
Wikipedia: Jheronimus Bosch (English language).

April 30, 2015

The “Bossche Bol” And The “Moorkop”: Sweet Or Unsweetened Debate…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Nobody can come to ‘s-Hertogenbosch (a.k.a. Den Bosch)  without trying it’s best known speciality: the  “Bossche bol”.

Obviously  we knew all about this delicacy and headed to a cafe advertising this delicacy on offer.

Wikipedia (links at the end of this post) explains the history of this speciality and that of it’s close cousin the “Moorkop”. Both texts are however only available in Dutch so I’ll translate the most important points here for you.

A “Bossche” a ball or sjekladebol (chocoladebol) is a baked choux pastry / profiterole / cream puff  ball about the size of a small adult fist that is filled with cream and given a dark (never milk chocolate) chocolate glaze.

Bossche Bollen (Literally:” Balls from Den Bosch”)  have a diameter of around 12 cm and are thus considered large cakes. Nevertheless, there is also a version with a double cross-section; the so-called “reuzenbol” (“giant ball”).

The delicacy called a “Bossche Bol” outside  ‘s-Hertogenbosch, but inside the city the locals call it a ” sjekladebol ” (Kiwi’s note: “sjekladebol” reflects the local dialect and if you’d like a go at pronouncing it then try a drunkenly slurred version of “chocoladebol” = “shock-laar-der-bol”.

Wiki then goes on to tell me that the Bossche Bol that the difference between these and Moorkops is that the later are not coated with real chocolate, are smaller and come with extra whipped cream on top.

However my Dutch husband strongly disputes the “not using real chocolate” bit and felt that maybe this Wiki piece was written by a someone in the city who might like to big up the local product.

Eating a “Bossche” can of course get rather messy, especially considering all that cream inside, so one tip from the locals is to turn it around so that the chocolate side is down and bite through the softer choux pastry at the bottom, that’s supposed at result in less cream squirting out all over your face, but having watched my children tackle these at other times, that theory remains open for debate. (or I just have messy kids, and yes  …that’s a very strong possibility).

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The article goes on to say that the “reuzenbol” (giant ball) , being the even bigger version, has often resulted in visitors reaching for assistance in the form of a knife and fork: something that is seen as exceptionally bad form by the purist locals.

Prior to the twentieth century in ‘s-Hertogenbosch, the predecessor of the current Bossche Bol was sold by confectioner Lambermont, in a building at the former Cat Vischstraat number B61.

Lambermont’s “Bol” resembled a Moorkop but was filled with custard.

When  in 1920 the Hague confectioner Henri van der Silk started  the “Hague Confectionery, Lunchroom and Snelbuffet “in Den Bosch also in the Vischstraat (number 25) he developed a variant, with cream filling and topped with real chocolate, which should be seen as his descendants as original of the Bossche bol.   During the course of the 1920’s, Lambermont  also sold the cream filled variant. The name “Bossche Bol” has become established over the course of time, especially with the popularity of the delicacy outside of Den Bosch. The exact recipe for it varies from baker to baker.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

At the beginning of the twenty-first century, confectionery Jan de Groot  was widely known as ‘the address’ for the Bossche bol.

The bakery was founded in 1936 by Jan de Groot senior and his wife Marie de Groot Van Gaal, but only later, after moving, started selling chocolate balls and other creamy pastries according of course to his own recipe.

For “Bossche Bol” Jan de Groot are now considered as “the originals”.

The secret Bosche Bol recipe is transferred only within the family and in 2000  the “Bossche Bol of Jan de Groot” registered as a protected trademark. The name “Bossche Bol” is thereby  protected, but only the combination with the name of Jan de Groot.

The “cousin” of the Bossche Bol is the “Moorkop” (literally: Moor head, Moors being a traditionally Muslim people of mixed Berber /  Arab ancestry, now living chiefly in northwest Africa)

A Moorkop is also a profiterole pastry filled with whipped cream.

Wiki tells me that a Moorkop is glazed with white or dark chocolate but in over twenty years here I’ve never seen a white glazed one. I asked Himself and he has never seen it either although we once saw one glazed in milk chocolate and it was unusual enough to be a point of conversation.

It’s true that there is usually whipped cream on the top, but in Dutch café’s they have a tendency to pile whipped cream onto almost everything unless you specifically ask them not to.

Wiki tells me that the origin of the  “Moorkop”name also lies in Den Bosch. There was a house named ‘de Moriaan’, and the residents were well known for their cooking, specialising in delicious patisseries.

At some point in time a pastry became a popular delicacy and someone shouted: ‘it looks like a morenkop’ (the stone head of a moor, or black  man , that hung above many pharmacies). That is apparently  how the Moorkop got it’s name.

Himself tells me that there is only one major difference between a Bossche Bol and a Moorkop and that is that a Bossche Bol is filled with unsweetened cream and a Moorkop with sweetened cream, in his opinion the Bossche Bol is nicest because the unsweetened cream is nicer against the sweetness of the chocolate topping whereas the Moorkop can be a little cloyingly  sweet.

Personally, as a near non-cream eater my only way to eat these is to empty all of the cream out of the Bol (or Moorkop) onto Himself’s plate (For him there is no such thing as “too much cream”) from there I just eat the profiterole and the chocolate!

Since Himself was absent on this trip I opted for one of the least creamy pastries in the shop: a slice of apricot pie (I adore apricots), and one of my friends followed in the no-cream option with a slice of apple pie.

The others however opted for a Bossche Bol and it’s by pure coincidence (it was really close to St Jan’s Cathedral)  that we choose the establishment of Jan de Groot to sample Den Bosch’s most famous fare, so the Bossche Bol in the photograph is very much the “real deal”!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Bossche Bollen   (text Dutch language only)

Moorkop (text Dutch language only)

April 29, 2015

Little Figures Looking Down On Us…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

We are visiting the Dutch city of  s-Hertogenbosch (a.k.a. Den Bosch) and one of the many reasons we have decided on a return visit one day is that the historic centre of the city has a stunning amount of architectural detail.

We have only walked around a few streets and yet I’ve spied a heap of small statues, wall plaques, and general arty detail.

There are also some buildings that seriously lean, but I supposed you’d be a bit bent and crooked if you were between two and four hundred years too!

I think that the city must be predominantly Roman Catholic because I find many statues of  the Holy family and the virgin Mary and child, usually recessed into the corners of buildings.

There are also many decorations on buildings (I think I lost a photographic chip here because I seem to remember taking a lot more photographs than I ended up having in my computer folder in the end). It certainly pays to look around you in these historic cities since many of the most beautiful architectural features are above your eye line.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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“In The Put” is one of the places where there historically was a well…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

April 28, 2015

“Christoffel” And A Small Clash Of Cultures…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

This series of archive posts is all about a Saturday trip to the Noord-Brabands city of Den Bosch.

We’ve already been on one of the boat tours, the others have spent some time at the visiting kermis (fun fair) whilst I visited the St Jan’s (St John’s) Cathedral.

We did however stop for lunch at a café / restaurant called “Christoffel“.

The portion sizes were rather too small for our Canadian visitor, even though  to be fair this was a lunch menu rather than a dinner one, and she had definite issues with the fact that the small salad and side order of fries (I forgot to photograph them) that were  bought out were not just for her, but was meant to be shared with me because we both had ordered a warm lunch and a joint salad and fries are not uncommon here in the Netherlands.

Yes, the portions are small but the rest of us, being used to this had no issues and the food was  ok.

It wasn’t the best lunch I’ve ever eaten but it was also far from the worst and I’d eat there again myself. I wouldn’t go so far as to recommend it to someone like Himself however, because as a very tall, strapping Dutchman with a healthy appetite, he likes a plateful to be a plate full… and if that plate happens to be a pasta dish then a plate and a half would be most welcome no matter what time of the day.

It was certainly a cultural learning curve and reminded me that what visitors expect is not always delivered in Europe.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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April 27, 2015

Windows, Statues And A Last Look Around…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

This is my final post from Sint-Jankathedral (Sint John’s Cathedral) of s-Hertogenbosch (a.k.a. Den Bosch).

The remaining windows are also beautiful and some feature the names of the donors who helped make or restore them.

I find one modern window tucked away in a side alcove, and more 19th Century windows that feature various coats of arms, all stunningly worked in glass.

Lastly there are the statues that line the main pillars of the cathedral, the ones that separate the nave from the side aisles.

As much attention has been given to the stone as is evident in the stained glass windows: flowing robes, palm fronds, staffs and swords, amazing craftsmanship given that one slip of the chisel could so easily ruin an entire statue.

There is also a wooden statue of a male figure, standing on a plinth with flowers are pot plants at his feet and I’m assuming that this might be St Jan (St John) , the cathedrals namesake because there is also a stand in front of the greenery where worshippers can add a lit candle.

It’s now time for me to rejoin my friends,  we have arranged to meet out the front of the church at a set time and now, all too soon that time is upon us. In fact the morning is racing away and there are still things to do…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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April 26, 2015

More Beautiful Shimmering Panes Of Light…

A Photographic post today…More beautiful stained glass…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(Sint-Janskathedraal) of ‘s-Hertogenbosch

April 25, 2015

Take A Little Piece Of Coloured Glass…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Regular readers know that I love stained glass.

Visiting churches and cathedrels in Europe gives me an inside into stained glass from centuries past, some medieval glass remains, others are mostly 18th and 19th century additions.

Then, in the 20th century there are also some very modern additions alongside their ancient counterparts.

The glass in each church is different, the general idea of central panels with figures, each telling a story from the bible is a central theme, as are ornate borders and corner pieces.

There are also small panels that are personal to the area, details pertaining in certain people and dates, sometimes important people in the area or the church and sometimes benefactors.

Sint-Jankathedral (Sint John’s Cathedral) of s-Hertogenbosch (a.k.a. Den Bosch)  is a cathedral that has all of the above. There is amazing detail in the picture windows that tell the various biblical stories. but also in the detail of the surrounding “frames” and the strip along the base of the windows that depicts various coats of arms etc. and in some ways these outer sections fascinate me as much or sometimes even more than the central parts of the windows.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(Sint-Janskathedraal) of ‘s-Hertogenbosch

April 24, 2015

The Vines On The Ceiling are Growing On Me…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The roof  of the nave in medieval cathedrals almost defy imagination given their height and decorative elements, especially given that they were all made without the modern tools.

when I visited Sint-Janskathedraal (Sint John’s Cathedral) of ‘s-Hertogenbosch in Noord Braband, there happened to be a wedding taking place at the alter, so I took a seat on the isle and listened whilst the couple took their vows.

Just before that however there was a small sermon by the priests about marriage and during that, I pointed camera skywards as I listened.

With the camera on maximum zoom and being without a tripod, seated, I steady myself by leaning back and being as still as I possibly can take photographs of the ceiling high above me.

I first thought that the enter-twining vine like decoration was a “set” repeating pattern, but once I can see them in more detail I find that each section is unique, even opposite sections are not mirror images as I first assumed.

The wonder of this is that “balance” is still perfectly achieved, nothing is seriously lop-sided and it takes a good long look, or a zoom lens to see that each section is really an individual piece.

I’m assuming that this isn’t the original version of the decoration because the original paint has probably been refreshed and given a new layer with each major renovation that cathedral has undergone.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Sint Johns Den Bosch 1k (Small)

(Sint-Janskathedraal) of ‘s-Hertogenbosch

April 23, 2015

A Pulpit, Organ And Icons… St John’s Cathedral, Den Bosch.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Also in the (Sint-Janskathedraal (Sint John’s Cathedral) of ‘s-Hertogenbosch in Noord Braband are several separate prayer areas open to the public to use for that purpose.

I looked into the doorway of one of these areas and spied some wonderful icon images, but not wanting to disturb the people inside the room, kept my distance in the doorway and silently took some photographs without using the flash (as is my custom anyway).

One of the other beautiful things in the cathedral is a wooden carved pulpit, it’s situated in the main body of the church and not up by the alter, and in the same style as the other European churches and cathedrals I have visited, the carved decoration covers every centimetre from top to bottom.

Even the very functional stairs are richly ornamented and it took some very skilful people many months or even maybe years to achieve this amount of detail.

From Wikipedia (link at bottom of this post) I learn that the organ in the cathedral:  ” is one of the most important organs of the Netherlands. The organ case of this organ is one of the most monumental of the Renaissance in the Netherlands.

This organ has a long history that begins with the construction in the period 1618-1638 by Floris Hocque II, Hans Goltfuss and Germer van Hagerbeer. The rood loft and the organ case were built by Frans Simons, a carpenter who probably came from Leiden.

The sculpture of the organ case was carved by Gregor Schysler from Tyrol, who, however, like Floris Hocque, was originally from Cologne.

The organ was renovated, expanded and improved in past centuries by several organ builders, according to the latest fashions.

The last renovation took place in 1984 and was conducted by the Flentrop firm. The organ was restored to about the situation of 1787, as the German organ builder A.G.F. Heyneman left it. Use is made of many pipes of that era, but also of pipes from later periods. In late 2003 the organ was thoroughly cleaned “.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(Sint-Janskathedraal) of ‘s-Hertogenbosch

April 22, 2015

Generations Entombed In Beauty And Bathed In Light…

One of the things that the Sint-Jankathedral (Sint John’s Cathedral) of s-Hertogenbosch (a.k.a. Den Bosch) is famous for, is the collection of beautiful decorative gravestones in it’s floor. They aren’t just flat engravings of names and dates in the floor either, there are some carved in decidedly high relief, and visitors have to be careful not to trip over them. I didn’t have any problem with that, after being this long on crutches I’m constantly looking at my feet. My photographs really don’t do these justice, there is a lot more detail in reality and they are really raised, a small wonder especially considering that some of them are now hundreds of years old. (btw: the splodges of colours in the photographs is light from the stained glass windows).

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(Sint-Janskathedraal) of ‘s-Hertogenbosch

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