Local Heart, Global Soul

November 5, 2016

The Pace Of Change Clearly Goes Faster Than I Do…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I needed to accompany Kiwi Daughter to an appointment in the centre of The Hague recently, and since I try to avoid the crowds of the city centre I was surprised to see that one ofthe buildings has undergone a face lift.

It may be old news to many people who go there frequently of course, but it was news to me and it put a large smile on my face.

The symbol of The Hague is the stork and the building has been embellished with large stork-like forms all around the lower edge of the façade. I love them!

They are sophisticated, beautiful, and even in their minimalist style, perfect for the job.

They have a semi-Deco vibe and even in the detail of the faces, have a cheeky, quirky humour about them. Did I mention that I love them? Wow!

The legs come out from the bodies to become some of the window divisions and basic black keeps everything looking dapper and elegant. The street lights are new to me too, harking back to old gas lanterns but with a very modern twist. Before we went to where we needed to go, I lingered for just a moment more to catch a few snaps of a dog, perched in the front crate of his owner’s bike, happily watching the world go by as he patiently waited for his owner to return. He seemed to be very well behaved, and confident, no barking or anything. Getting to the center of town is always a hassle because Himself has to bring me there and pick me up, but sometimes I need to make a bit more effort and try and get here more often, the pace of change clearly goes faster than I do.

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

 

April 19, 2016

There Is Always Something New (Or Old) To Look At…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Last summer Himself and I gathered up two of our neighbours children, friends of an accompanied by Little Mr. and took them on a Historic tram.

The journey has already taken us to the beach, back via the Statenquartier to the outskirts of the central city and now we prepare to go right through the heart of The Hague.

The weather was perfect for a tram ride, it was a blistering hot Sunday during the summer school holidays so Town was quiet and we rode in the shade.

Judging by the people packed like sardines into trams we saw earlier on the Scheveningenseweg heading to the beach, it would be safe to save that Scheveningen boulevard and beach would be crazily busy.

Himself and I are not a fan of crowds so smiled at each other as we had identical thoughts “Rather you folks than us”.

Our historic tram in comparison is only a quarter full and with the little windows open we have a slight breeze as we glide along the rails. I mentioned in yesterday’s post the after the Art Deco building that belongs to the ABM AMRO bank, there is the De Witt house, but the family moved out of this residence after their father Johan de Witt and his brother Cornelis de Witt, were murdered by Orangists on the Plein less than a block down the road.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

As we pass the Plein in the tram we see the statue of de Witt on the spot where the executions took place. A few meters further we pass the “Gevangenpoort” (Prisoner’s Gate) which is a former gate and medieval prison and as the tram turns right we come onto Buitenhof, another Plein, where cafe’s have their tables out in the sunshine.

One tip though to any would be-armed robber, don’t even think about holding up any of the cafe’s, shops or businesses on the right hand corner because directly above you is the Israeli Embassy and since security there is unreal you would probably get an instant armed response in a magnitude of your worst nightmare.

The tram swings almost instantly to the right as we go around a stunningly beautiful building that used to be called “Maison Bonneterie”, it was undergoing renovation at the time these photos were taken, having been empty for a while, what used to be a very high-end clothes shop became I think a casualty to the competition of on-line shopping. The next landmark on the right is ” ‘t Goude Hooft” which is The Hague’s oldest inn, dating back to 1423. Then on past the shops and restaurants on the right hand side of Grote Kerk (no photos of the church because I was on the wrong side of the tram). A left hand turn takes us into Torenstraat, which in the Dutch tradition of constantly changing street names with almost every intersection then becomes Jan Hendrikstraat for a few blocks before a right turn into the Prinsegracht.

We go past the underground tram tunnel entrance that the trams coming from Central Station use to get past the upper level foot traffic and finally in this post, find ourselves turning left into Brouwersgracht. Obviously this was historically the brewing centre of the Hague, but along with many of the canals in the centre of town, the waterways have long since been filled in (that’s the reason why streets like Prinsegracht and Brouwersgracht are wider than usual). The architecture styles range over multiple centuries, there is always something new, or old to look at… just take a look around.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Israeli Embassy in the corner…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Maison Bonneterie…  under renovation…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

‘t Goude Hooft…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Torenstraat looking to the right as we turned left around the corner…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Torenstraat, becomes Jan Hendrikstraat literally metres further on…( we have completed our right hand turn).

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Turning into the Prinsegracht…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Brouwersgracht…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

April 18, 2016

Heading Into The Centre Of The Hague…

Our historic tram now leaves the Peace Palace (also known as the International Court of Justice) and heads towards the central part of the city. In Dutch that’s called the “Centrum” or Centre.  We pass by several Embassies and Plein 1813 (featured in this 2011 blog post ” Plein 1813 …is also a Place in History… ” and businesses housed in some beautiful old buildings. Let’s take a look…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Embassy of Poland is the first building on the left…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Looking towards the centre of town, seeing Plein 1813 a little further down with it’s magnificent statue and the steeple of the Roman Catholic Church  H. Jacobus de Meerdere on the left in the distance. Behind the trees on the right is the first of several separate, but very similarly styled former mansion houses, now housing businesses or Embassies. This first one is now a Pharmaceutical Foundation.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Embassy of Poland from the side as we go past…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Going around the statue…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Embassy of Italy…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I think this one is a law firm… but I’m not 100% certain.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The Oxfam Novib building on the other side of the canal…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

This appears to be a modern extension to the Oxfam Novib building on the right hand side of the photograph… the building on the left is a “Stek, Stichting voor Stad en Kerk” (Stek, Foundation for Town and Church).

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Then the “College van Beroep voor het Hoger Onderwijs” (College for  Appeals of Higher Education)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

A photograph of a statue, but also the reflections of Historic Tram number 37 and a regular tram going the other way.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Builging on the right:  “Raad Van State” (Council Of State Building).

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Paleis Kneuterdijk  (Palace Kneuterdijk)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The art deco wonder that is today the residence of the ABN AMRO Bank …

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Kneuterdijk Number 6 is a National historic building because it was the home the famous pensionary Johan de Witt from 1669-1672.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

 

April 17, 2016

Landmarks Of All Kinds, For Locals And Abroad…

The next stage of our historic tram ride takes us through the Statenkwartier and past some very well known landmarks…

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Europol, The European Branch of Interpol…

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

This round building is the OPCW (Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons)…

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Through this archway is the World Forum building, it’s better recognised from the other side where it has been the back drop for many an international News report concerning the International Criminal Tribunal
for the former Yugoslavia… the Milosevic trial etc…

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The actual International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia buildings are a little further along. (We have a friend who helps work with the security teams here, apparently this is one building you never want to even think about breaking into, there are “eyes” sensors and defences far above and beyond what any normal person can imagine and they are everywhere! No knocking on the door and asking for a cup of sugar from these neighbours!)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The Scheveningseweg (where we are about to turn right, past the tram in the next photograph) is a long, straight road dating “officially” as a pathed road from 1653, but excavation of roman artefacts here mean it is probably far older. The straightness of the road is unusual for the time and it’s being pathed at this time make it’s one of the Hague’s oldest roads.

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Entrance to the Catshuis … prounounced “cuts how se” (which literally translates as “cats house”, but has nothing to do with furry animals. Rather it refers to Jacobs Cats = a famous 17C Dutch poet who used to live there) It is now the official residence of the Dutch Prime Minister, although many chose to live in their own local home and prefer to use this residence to receive other Heads of State and VIP’s on formal visits / official business etc.

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Coming up to the Peace Palace…

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

April 16, 2016

Journey To The End Of The Line…

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The next section of our historic tram Number 37 ride from  Het Haags Openbaar Vervoer Museum (the Hague Public Transport Museum) takes us from Statenlaan to the end of the line.

The terminus of the tram line is literally just meters from the beach so needless to say the regular tram (Line 11) on sunny weekends and holidays can be found packed full of beach-goers.

Our tram is of course a special touring tram so we had plenty of space to look around as the tram made it’s way past the old and new Kazerne Scheveningen,(Scheveningen Fire Station),  on the corner of the Duinstraat which has featured in several of my previous blog posts  including:  On Fire With Beauty, About To Start A New Lease Of Life…   .

We get to the end of the line and then do the loop and come back they way we have come… we will not be heading completely back to the Remise though, we just have to back-track a little way before we can get to where we want to go next.

The added bonus of the short back-track that we need to do is that part of it takes place on the Van Boetzelaerlaan, which is a very wide street that has the tram running down it’s centre.

There is an area of grass running down each side of the tram, in one spot there is a playground and after the parking on each side and trees are taken into account, it means that if you are sitting on one side of the tram then you can only get a decent view of one side of the tram at a time.

Now that we are doubling back a little distance, I have the chance to not only see but photograph the other side of the street… and more beautiful architecture in the local houses so extra bonus! We will turn off soon but first let’s take a look at the journey to the end of the line…

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The beach is literally two meters away from the other side of the road… note the tram tracks, you could literally not get closer with the tram…

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Other posts concerning the Kazerne Scheveningen,(Scheveningen Fire Station) are:
The Dousing At The End In No Way Waters Down The Day…
A Perfectly Sized Crowd For Seeing And Doing…
Literally Cutting Edge Technology…
King Of The “Castle”, Detail Fanatics Rejoice…
Great Stuff Inside, Beginning With A Bouncing Start…

    (photograph © Kiwidutch)

November 15, 2015

King Of The “Castle”, Detail Fanatics Rejoice…

Little Mr and two young neighbourhood friends enjoyed a visit to an Open Day by the Hague’s fire service this last summer. The location was the “barracks Duinstaat Castle” the Kazerne Scheveningen, (Scheveningen Fire Station). The old fire station building is next to the old one, which is an example of beautiful architecture. Regular readers will know that I love detail, so here are some examples to share with all fellow detail fanatics…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

November 14, 2015

Great Stuff Inside, Beginning With A Bouncing Start…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Following yesterday’s post about our summer visit Kazerne Scheveningen, (Scheveningen Fire Station), a beautiful building known locally as the “barracks Duinstaat Castle” due to it’s style of architecture.

The Kazerne (pronounced “car zer nuh”) started out life as a combined police station and fire station but’s it’s services have since been transferred: the police station to another location close by and the new fire station located right next door.

Himself and I have bought Little Mr and two of his neighbourhood friends to an Open Day so that they can have a behind-the-scenes look at what goes on. The Open Day is taking place in the current fire station, the large ladder appliance is outside, as are a few other things that are being set up, but it is a large bouncy castle located just inside one of the engine bays that captures the attention of the kids first. They play for a while before pausing for breath and starting to look around at the exhibits on display. There are motorcycles to sit on and engines to take a look at, certainly enough to keep kids happy…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

p.s. Himself has been on the phone half of the day to the two companies who provide our phone and internet, they continue (as per the past 10 days) to blame each other. Finally Himself manages to get contact with someone in management and after some “I-am-now-a-seriously-unhappy-customer” chat, we got a promise that someone from tech support (again!!!) will ring us. This time they spend a further 45 minutes on the phone with Himself, having him crawling under desks to do stuff to the modem and general process of elimination until they eventually solved things. Yeeeeah …Fingers crossed!

October 16, 2015

De Passage, Den Haag: So Much More Than A Passageway…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

There is a unique shopping area in the Hague that charms both locals and tourist alike.

Effectively it is a small covered street, where the roof is largely made of glass and is both a shopping street and a well used short-cut for pedestrians between the busy streets of Spuistraat, Hofweg and Buitenhof.

You might well image that this is a recent addition to the Hage city centre, but far from it, “de Passage” is the oldest shopping center in the Netherlands and ranks among the Top 100 of Dutch UNESCO monuments.

I’ve translated information from Wikipedia (Dutch language entry only) in italics, and link to websites below.

“Passage” (pronounced “Par saar je”) “was commissioned in 1885 by the NV ‘s-Gravenhaagsche Passage Society, which was co-founded by the famous Hagenaar Petrus Josephus the Sonnaville (1830 to 1925), also one of the founders of the Kurhaus in Scheveningen.

The original passage of 1885 runs from Spuistraat towards the Buitenhof. In 1929 Hofweg was added to the pedestrian area. The oldest part (the Spuistraat- Buitenhof and arm) was built by architects Herman Wesstra Jr. and JC van Wijk according to an international orientated Renaissance style, while the later part towards Hofweg is built in an expressionist style.”

Where the three different “points” of the Passage meet together, there is a round tower-like effect topped off with a glass dome in the roof. The patterns are captivating and over the years whenever I walked though it, it was highly likely that you could spy someone with a camera pointed upwards towards the dome, straining to get all of it into the photograph, or pointing the camera downwards at the stunning inlaid marble centerpiece directly benieth the center of the dome. There are apartments above the shops, and the only bar to getting a great photograph are the special nets stretched across the open area towards the roof to stop any birds that fly in from getting trapped inside. It’s a beautiful piece of architecture so let’s take a look around…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 The Passage, Den Haag
Offical Website De Passage

March 8, 2015

The Elephant In The …. City

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

As you enter  the city of The Hague you pass by many buildings that have become architectural icons of the city.

Most of these are fairly modern additions to the landscape of the city, and line the route of the A12  highway as it morphs into the Utrechtsebaan.

Once we reach the  green expanse of the Marlieveld however, and are about to turn either left into Zuid Hollandlaan or right into the Benoordenhoutseweg  (a.k.a. the “N44”) one iconic building will have your complete attention all to itself.

It’s even got it’s own nickname: “de Rode Olifant”  (The Red Elephant).

I tried to find out more about the building and it’s history , both were sparse (I suspect the the decent information is in the archives at the Stadhuis (City Hall) but I’m not mobile enough to get there and have too much pain to focus properly so will have to make do with translating some information found on-line.

The websites are both in the Dutch language (and links as usual are at the bottom of this post.)

The building known affectionately as “the red elephant” is an imposing building built in the Amsterdam School style, which once served as headquarters of the Esso oil company.  

The structure is red brick with many ornaments and decorations. According to local legend the story is that it was built in order to have a view down on it’s oil company competitor Shell, with the tower of the “elephant” looking the Shell building a few streets away directly in the eye. The Hague Montessori Lyceum (a High School nearby) has  used the basement for it’s yearly projects  of various topics.  

The building is bordered by Jozef Israëlslaan, Zuid Hollandlaan and Mesdagstraat ans was for some years the premises of the law firm Brown and Westbroek. In 2009 the building was renovated and has been looking for a permanent owner ever since.

It’s a building that I like a great deal… and I really hope that it gets a permanent owner really soon.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

http://wikimapia.org/16817/nl/De-Rode-Olifant

http://www.staalnieuwestijl.nl/blog.php?c=Architectuur

March 30, 2014

A View Out Of The Window, Looking Out On My City…

Everyone has sections of their cities that they visit often:  neighbourhoods where friends and family live, where appointments take place and places we like to explore because we are recommended somewhere new or we discover by accident (usually en route to somewhere else). I like to keep my camera with me in the car, one bonus of not being mobile enough to drive is that at least I get to take photographs from the passenger seat instead. This post is a photographic essay of  just  few of the sights I have seen during my car travels … another glimpse of the city I live in: The Hague.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Sometimes the interesting stuff is literally at your feet…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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