Local Heart, Global Soul

December 13, 2018

A Glimpse Into The Workings On An Unusual Rooftop…

Following our tour of “The New Farm” fish farm, my friends and the rest of the tour party take the stairs upstairs. I have my crutches instead of the wheelchair, but these steps will be beyond me. The staff here have an alternative route for me that is not usually open to the public. This route takes a small lift to the roof  level and is the “back way” through the glass houses and growing areas. This gives me a unique view on how the vegies and herbs are grown here. There is another large glass house behind me, I’m not allowed to enter it but see through the closed wall that it’s full of sweet pepper plants and thousands of peppers. I didn’t get photographs of those because we had to moving foreword with the staff member. I asked about taking photographs, explained about my blog and was told that taking photographs would be fine. The space on the roof is larger than I first thought it was looking up from street level, and it shows just how much can be grown on top of one building, and how much more we could do if more commercial and residential buildings were built with rooftop gardens.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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December 12, 2018

Not Your Average Fish Tank…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The next part of our “The New Farm” visit is a fish farm!

It’s most unexpected to see this inside a city high rise building but apparently this is perfectly suited as in industry to work alongside fruit and veggies.

All of the guests on the tour don apparel to keep the environment clean and proceed on a tour of the tanks.

The fish we see are larger because the tiny ones in the “nursery” are more delicate and are kept apart from the public.

I can’t climb the ladder to look inside the tanks but I’m tall enough to hold the camera up high and then shoot photographs from all angles until I get some lucky shots.

(I checked photography was allowed, apparently it doesn’t bother the fish at all).

The fish are checked multiple times per day and if any fish is looking like it’s getting too big then it is relocated into a tank for fish it’s size. The absolute genius of this system is that the plants upstairs are farmed hydroponically, the water comes down from upstairs and is cleaned via a set of filters, the drop of the water also oxygenates the water for the fish, the water from the fish contains fish droppings which is in turn pumped upstairs to feed the plants. Both the plants and the fish benefit from this method of farming. The fish are sold to local restaurants and residents. It’s a win-win situation and both types of farming have a low “food miles” footprint. ingenious!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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December 11, 2018

Rising Markets…

Visiting the “New Farm”, an urban garden in the Hague, is an eye opening experience. Urban gardening is an excellent idea, bringing use to former office spaces, growing food literally around the corner or a few kilometres away from the people who eat it. We go three quarters of the way up the building where there is a large balcony that looks over the city. It’s wide enough for a small market, where local artisan food producers can set up a stall and sell their produce. Of course as avid foodies, our friends and I take a look…

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Views from the balcony…

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December 10, 2018

New Farm, When Urban Gardening Reaches New Heights…

There is a new revolution going on around the world, where people are trying to cut down on the “food miles”  generated by the food we eat. By this it is meant the number of miles/kilometres that are between where there food is produced and where it is consumed. This means things cutting down on food transport wherever possible. This has meant the development of Urban gardens, and The Hague is no different. An old office building has been partly converted to become a place where fresh vegetables are grown and the name of this enterprise is “The New Farm.” Amazingly the farm produces not just tomatoes and peppers but also herbs and fish! I went with friends to take a look two summers ago, and also, of course to buy some local vegetables.

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October 20, 2018

Is Friendliness Perhaps Just A Matter Of Space?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

This post is as usual, a continuation of a series of posts as Family Kiwidutch journey around, on this occasion our December 2017-January 2018 trip where we visited several different parts of New Zealand.

So far we have spent time catching up with friends and family, been to Wellington and back from our base in Christchurch, Himself has passed out directly after getting out of a hot tub; “Drama Of The Sort I Could Do Without… “, we have come up to Hanmer Springs and almost immediately hit the road again on a spur of the moment side trip.

Himself managed to leave behind in Hanmer Springs the suitcase that contained his and my clothes, my medication, nebulizer and our toiletries, so an urgent shopping trip ensued:  Just The Clothes We Stood Up In… , and now the next thing we needed to get sorted in our Greymouth accommodation was food.

Stomachs were rumbling after our shopping spree, luckily the “South Of The Barber Hostel” has a large communal kitchen where we can not only cook up a feast, but also make acquaintance with other tourists stopping for the night here too. They come from all over the world, some have only a few short weeks to tick as many places as possible off their New Zealand places, experiences and sights bucket list, others have three months and are travelling at a more leisurely pace.

Their stories and experiences are amazing. Apart from a few tiny hiccups (food stolen from one of the fridges during their stay) their experiences have been overwhelmingly positive, their praise for the friendliness of New Zealanders abounding.

For me, as a New Zealand born and raised Kiwi, it is just “standard” good manners and upbringing/culture to lend a hand when I can, to give some local advice to help someone else out, tourist or fellow Kiwi, offer hospitality, food, lodging or skills when I can. It never fails to surprise me that visitors to New Zealand are shocked to find it so, What is so different in societies of their home counties that people find my “normal” so exceptional? Maybe the answer is in population sizes?

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The Netherlands has been my long term home for over twenty years now, and with 17 million people crammed into a space the size of the New Zealand Province of Canterbury, the way people live could not be more different from the country I was born in, so it should maybe be no surprise that people live in a less communal way.

People here are surprised if you say “good morning” to them on the street, cars force themselves into gaps in the traffic because they don’t expect that someone will take the time to let them in, If you are on a busy road and let someone in from a side street, it’s not unusual that someone behind you honks their horns in annoyance, even if the traffic light ahead is red.

Probably traffic manners are a bad example; nice, reasonable, kind people all over the world can turn into monsters when they get behind the wheel of their vehicles.

Maybe it’s a fact that when people are in a crowd and crowded society, they tend to look after No.1 more, there is more competition and they have to fight harder to be at the front of the queue for everything: roads, jobs, schools, leisure spots, flights, it probably even starts in nursery. I take to Wikipedia to compare the population of the Netherlands and the land area it fits into;

https://www.crwflags.com/fotw/flags/nz(.html
Provinces of New Zealand”
Province of Canterbury -Area in square kms: 44.508km², Population: 612.000, Population density:13.48

…in contrast you could easily fit all of the Netherlands into the New Zealand Province of Canterbury:
Area in square kms:  41,526 km², Population: 17,000,000, Population density: (August 2018:415 per km2),  making it thirty-first most densely populated  country in the world.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demography_of_the_Netherlands
“Wikipedia / Demography of the Netherlands”

Who knows what the real reason is, I’m just guessing here and putting out an idea. Either way these compliments about friendliness that Kiwi’s should be proud of but never complacent about.

November 8, 2017

Step-By-Step: Wok Are Your Tips And Tricks?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

In yesterdays post I covered our discovery of “Eazie” in Scheveningen, one of a chain of restaurants in the Netherlands.

The principle behind the cuisine is that diners select fresh ingredients which are then wok fried in front of them, the prepared food can be eaten in the restaurant or taken away.  As usual I asked permission to take photographs of the restaurant interior and once given, added that I would love to also take photographs of the cooking process.

Permission was given for that too and soon I was clicking away. During this observation I also picked up some wok cooking tips and tricks. The first tip for doing this at home is probably the most basic: all meat, fish and veggies have to be cut in sizes suitable to them all cooking evenly together.

The thickness of all the carrot pieces, for instance should be as uniform as possible. I have the luxury of having an electric slicer, and during the summer tried an experiment that turned out to be a huge success. I got Himself to bring home a huge bag of veggies from the Haagse markt where  the prices are less than half the price of the supermarkets.

That said, you will need to do a fraction more work with your bargains: (a) often you have to check veggies for bad spots or the odd bit that’s well on the way to going rotten,(b) veggies are often waaay cheaper because they are misshapen, so be prepared to spend more time peeling around knobbly bits of carrots etc. (c) veggies are usually more on the “ripe” end of the scale than the “under ripe” end of the scale, so be careful buying in bulk if you can’t use it all before it’s past being edible.

Since sitting is something I do rather well these days, I sat on a stool and washed, peeled, topped, tailed, stripped off nasty outside bits of carrots, onions, beans, chinese cabbage, cauliflower, capsicum peppers, broccoli, and other seasonal veggies so that I had a massive pile of whole, but prepared veggies for slicing. Then the slicer came out and on a thin setting I started slicing it all.

Soon I was surrounded by mounds of white, green, orange and yellow veggies, which I then mixed up together. The last step was easy: fill up freezer bags and stack them all in the freezer. Whenever we fancied a stir-fry at a later date, all we had to do was grab a bag of pre-cut veggies from the freezer and head towards the stove. The thinness of the veggies means they separate, thaw and cook easily. The biggest surprise is that the onions and Chinese cabbage stayed white and mostly kept their shape, I had imagined I’d get a soggy brown mess once it thawed so this was a wonderful surprise.

Here at “Eazie” the veggies are fresh of course and not frozen; and have already been cut to appropriate thicknesses and even sizes.  An excellent tip I learned from these professionals is that they put your meat/fish/veg into a sieve and plunge it into a pot of boiling water to blanch them for a couple of minutes, then drain/ shake the water off and transfer everything to the waiting hot wok.

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This not only partly cooks harder things like carrots, broccoli and cauli stems and the like, it also keeps the colours bright so the end result doesn’t look like a dull coloured mess. (I’ve been there with my stir-frys, I’ll bet you have on occasion too).

Then the hardest bit of all: a serious heat and a decent wok pan. Stupidly when I bought my new stove I was delighted that it had a special Wok burner that goes far harder than the other gas flames.

Less intelligent of me was that on this model stove this element is near the wall and not in the middle row (I have six burners), so I can only use a very small pan to use it with. I have been making do with a regular fry pan but think that I should think about getting a proper wok for the job because then the heat is in the right place at the right time.

The problem with a fry pan is that you have a lot of heat but the flames get too big around the pan so I keep turning it down, and needing longer cooking time and my stir-frys have been a little more wilted than I’d like.

I’ve heard raves about Ken Hom stainless woks so maybe I need to have a word with Santa about that one. The next thing I learn from watching the Eazie chefs is that they keep the heat high and the pan moving more than I imagined they would. They use the long handled spoon/ ladle thingy to work the sauce around the meat and veggies as the meal cooks. I am going to try this technique, especially the quick blanching first and see if I can improve not only the appearance but also the taste of my wok meals from now on.(Please note that my photos are a compilation of several different meals since I was tired and not all of my pics were sharp).

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https://www.thuisbezorgd.nl/eazie-scheveningen
Eazie, Restaurant Scheveningen / The Hague/ The Netherlands

November 7, 2017

Wok Kind Of Place Is “Eazie?”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Kiwi Daughter was responsible for the next stage of our family outing. Actually there was no saying “No” to this one, she was insistent that “Eazie” was the only place we would be going to eat.

The restaurant in question is located on the front side of the Kurhaus almost right on the junction of the Gevers Deynootweg and the Badhuisweg.

Set back just a fraction from the road, this is a place I remember vaguely from the past as a restaurant, but just not as this particular one.

The idea behind the menu is simple: These are custom-made wok meals. First as a customer you  choose from an array of fresh meat, fish and vegetables; these are put into bowl by staff,  you then choose a sauce and the chef cooks your selected wok meal for you in front of your eyes (should you wish to watch, rather than go take a seat).

Kiwi Daughter is sixteen and she and her friends have a series of favourite restaurants that they like to go to eat and hang out in, this is one of them. The food is fresh and tasty, it’s easy to cater to various dietary needs and specific cultural requirements, the prices are very reasonable and the seating areas are relaxed and comfortable for large or small groups. Since these kids are too young for bars, (Dutch law is strict about underage drinking) and they still have a decent amount of study to get done for school, these places are ideal meeting places, especially during weekends and school holidays.

Himself and I had never been here before so she was keen to show us around, point out how it worked and see if we agreed with her about how it tasted. We checked out the menu options: there are various sizes of meals, double portions of meat or fish have a small additional cost and some sauces are very spicy, some sweet. My one and only complaint is that there was no Soya sauce on the sauce menu since I prefer my wok veggies served with just a hint of salty flavour and nothing else. No double portions were needed on this occasion, we just started picking out vegetables with gusto.

Little Mr had been promised chicken nuggets as a treat but was prepared to wait for us to eat here first, so the rest of us got our bowls picked out and into their separate woks. Afterwards the food is transferred into cardboard boxes and served at the table from those into small bowls. Yum! This was excellent! Vegetables were cooked but still with crunch, we each had our favourite ingredients and this was relaxed, healthy and quick. I’d come here again no problem. Even better it’s possible to get food home delivered and there are more branches in the Hague and other Dutch cities.

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https://www.thuisbezorgd.nl/eazie-scheveningen
Eazie, Restaurant Scheveningen / The Hague/ The Netherlands

November 6, 2017

Spiraling In Perfect Control…

Sitting in a cabin that goes around a big wheel might be one thing, but bungy jumping is quite another level of adventure.Even if I were fit and had the use of both legs, bungy jumping is definitely on my ” No Way Ever!” list.
Suddenly Kiwi Daughter announced that she might like to do this one day. Not here in the Netherlands but in New Zealand, on some future visit.This is a huge change of tune, whenever we used to go past the bridge close the Hanmer springs where it’s possible to go bungy jumping, she always said she would never ever consider it.Mind you, she was my eleven year old Kiwi daughter back then, and my sixteen year old Kiwi Daughter of today has obviously grown in daring as well as in years.

It remains to be seen if this bravado makes the transition from talk into action. If I report a sudden thatch of grey hair it may well be because my daughter is standing with bungy cords around her feet on a little platform above a river, about to jump. I was more than content to look at the building from the big wheel and the Scheveningen pier, and just enjoy the architectural beauty of the way the staircase on the outside of the building spirals around the tower.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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http://www.bungy.nl/
Scheveningen Bungy Jump / Attractions The Hague / The Netherlands

(Sorry: This link not working properly either, still working on it)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

November 5, 2017

Brain Cells Moved Out And Left No Forwarding Address…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Ok, I better come clean; I accidently missed out some photographs in yesterday’s post.

You will see that I mention the rain on the window in yesterday’s post but the proper photo of it appears in todays post, ditto the photographer taking photos of the group of girls by the waters edge.

As usual my brain cells appeared to be sleeping (ha! who am I kidding, I think they weren’t just sleeping, they moved out and left no forwarding address!) when I put everything into the WordPress schedule.

My Apologies and a big “Thank You” to Ellen for drawing this to my attention because I realised my mistake when I read your comment.

The Scheveningen ‘Reuzenrad” (Giant wheel) was a delight for three of the Family Kiwidutch, for Himself it was more of an endurance test.

I strongly suspect that he has been listening to Kiwi Daughter express an interest in going skydiving and bungee jumping one day and he’s done this so that he can say he’s “been there, done that” with anything to do with heights and then use the opt out card when she hints strongly that he should accompany her on these other pursuits.

The dark sea and clouds on the horizon give clues to the changeable weather.

In fact it was warm enough that when the rain stopped just after our “Reuzenrad” ride (Murphy’s Law, someone had to draw the short straw, it seems it was our “lucky” day), that by the time we had made our way back to the beginning of the pier, the stone tiles on the Promenade were already completely dry in most places.

I gave fair warning to Ellen in my reply comment yesterday, that todays photographs also contained images that may be difficult for people who find heights stomach churning.

These are the last about the big wheel until probably next summer when we will plan to go again but on a day with far better weather.

Aaagggh, don’t you both love and hate technology? My link hiccup still continues today… Apologies again, I’ll keep trying to fix it until it comes good.

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http://www.pier.nl/company/reuzenrad-op-de-pier/
Scheveningen Giant Wheel / Scheveningen Eye / Attractions The Hague / The Netherlands

November 4, 2017

Taking A Spin Around A Giant Wheel…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Although we were on the Scheveningen pier one weekend last summer, it was not exactly the pier we were here for.

It was what was at the end of it that was important; the ‘Reuzenrad” (which literally in English means: “Giant wheel”). I have heard other people call this the “Scheveningen Eye” too, although it is not it’s official name.

This is what Himself and I had been dragged out of the house for, both of our kids agreed (that was a shock all of it’s own!) they really wanted to go on it, together!

Parents of a teenager and an almost teenager will likely gasp as we did, our two are at an age where being seen together in public most of the time is a major embarrassment.

Even more amazing, both Himself and I were welcome too (I think we should have checked them for fever, but it might possibly because of the fact that parents were paying).

Nowhere is the phrase ‘four seasons in one day” more apt than the Netherlands, it was a warm but overcast and patchy day, no sooner had we paid for our tickets and stood in line when the heavens opened.

There is a small amount of cover closest in by the wheel, luckily others in the front of the queue quickly snuggled up so that as many people at the end of the queue as possible could get in under this cover.

The queue moves fairly quickly despite the crowd so even though we were a short time getting wet it was soon our turn nearer the front of the queue.

It was possible to leave wheelchairs and push-chairs at the bottom, assistance was given to help me up the few steps to the cabin (I have my doubts that anyone less mobile than I am could manage this however, it might be possible with prior arrangement with the company, I do not know for sure.)

The cabins have a small table that can be lifted up when passengers enter and extended once they are seated, it allows for a small space to put your camera and other things on but please be warned, the space in the cabin is small so if you have a lot of stuff with you then things may get complicated.

There are also a few steps to negotiate before and after you get to the ticket office. I have a crutches holder on my wheelchair so could transfer to those for these sections but visitors unable to do this will have a problem because there are no ramps. We asked about this and were told that apparently it is somewhere on a lengthy “to do” list because this is a relatively new company and they are still ironing out all of the finer details. There is even a cabin that has a glass floor is you are really brave.

Of course I took pity on Himself and did not even think of suggesting that one!
Once inside our cabin we start to rise slowly in speed but quickly in elevation. I took a lot of photographs for our private family album, rather a lot of them of Himself’s face because due to his fear of heights I have never seen him so far away from terra firma (aircraft excepted). His fixed expression, wide eyes and willingness to only look into the furthest distance rather than straight down confirmed that this was the first and probably the very last time in our so far twenty-three year marriage that I was ever going to see him get on anything like this.

The cabin pauses at various points during your time whilst other passengers before you, exit at the bottom, and you get to make two full rotations before your turn has finished. It was our bad planning that we had chosen a spur of the moment activity on a day where the weather was less than cooperative: we got some clear photographs but others consisted of close-ups of rain filled windows.

Still, I used the zoom to get close-ups of the Kurhaus and of the scenes below us, such a photographer getting snaps of a group of girls by the seas edge. Our time was up too quickly (or maybe not quickly enough for Himself). Three out of the four of us immediately said we would love to come back and do this again on a fine day, Himself was noticeably silent (or still in shock). I was delighted that Kiwi Daughter and Little Mr worked together to bring us here as a family, so a very successful outing!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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http://www.pier.nl/company/reuzenrad-op-de-pier/
Scheveningen Giant Wheel / Scheveningen Eye / Attractions The Hague / The Netherlands

(Apologies for the link failure, I will keep trying to fix it until it’s good)

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