Local Heart, Global Soul

February 6, 2017

Taking A Much Needed Break From Everything In The Hague…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

2016 was a difficult year for Himself and I as far as travel opportunities were concerned.

My Mother in law was in failing health, a long drawn out series of dips and rallys that gave us hope one moment then dashed them the next as the next chest infection or illness set her back just a little bit further than where she had rallied to before.

She had been at least mentally active into her 90’s, but the physical excursions were getting slowly harder and harder. It was already testament to her constitution that she was still living alone in her home until she was 93 years of age.

She was lucky to not be suffering with anything like dementia, but like a well travelled vehicle with parts worn out, thinned and rusted from sheer old age, her hearing, eyesight and eventually memory started to falter.

Once remained of things she would quickly remember what she had forgotten, often putting the pieces back in remarkable detail but even in her good moments it became clear that the assistance that family hade been giving around the clock would have to be taken over by professionals.

Himself visited daily, I often did the lunchtime “slot” as we took turns, we both did weekends, but eventually the time that we were skipping at home with our own family and Himself’s work time started to catch up.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Clients, kids and their teachers understand when you need to drop everything for a family emergency, but not if that state of emergancy starts to be come a permanent situation.

Added to that, Himself and his two sisters were starting to suffer from burnout, stretched between home needs and that of their mother.

Just before Easter it became clear that my mother in law would be heading back into hospital again as another crisis hit.

After a while she was well enough to leave hospital but not well enough to come home, so a place was being arranged in a care home that had facilities that was between the two.

Consultation with his two sisters, both of which had arranged holidays in the following school holidays bought about the idea that we also deserved a break from this stressful and emotional situation, and with his mother in the full time care of a hospital environment, and his sisters on visiting duty and standby, we ended up taking advantage of the long weekend holiday that Easter offered to go to the island of Texel with friends.
In order to make the most of the weekend, we are ready and packed on the Thursday afternoon, heading away as soon as Kiwi Daughter and Little Mr are home from school.

We head northwards past Schipol airport, past aircraft taxiing over the air-bridge that goes over the motorway. The journey takes a while due to the usual evening rush-hour traffic but soon we are arriving on the outskirts of Den Helder…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The tiles under the air-bridge look like aircraft when viewed from a distance…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Dredging the cannals…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Outskirts of Den Helder…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

December 28, 2016

A Place For Smaller Kids To Let Off Steam…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

On the corner of the Elandstraat and Waldeck Pyrmontkade stands and old 19th Century school, now converted into a kinds of an “arts building” with separate sections consisting of workshops, eateries and children’s workshop activities.

One of the later is a children’s play area, and two friends who have young children with Birthday’s close together, decided to hold a joint birthday party there.

Little Mr was roped in to be a “big kid helper” , Himself as and extra parental pair of hands and me as party photographer.

The venue is excellent because both children’s birthday’s fall in the dead of winter and suitable energy intensive outdoor activities for four year olds are few and far between.

The beautiful hall sports all kinds of dance and play equipment, from large rubber bouncy balls to gymnastic style crash mats and equipment. There is a small room off to one side of the main hall, food was arranged on tables inside, leaving the main hall free for more energetic activities.

Cakes were made for each “Birthday” kid, the rest of the fare consisted of healthy and easy finger food. The kids ran, played to their hearts content, food was demolished and candles on cakes were blown out, a good time was had by all.

For me, several hundred photos later, I have photographs galore of the party VIP’s and their friends, Himself and Little Mr were fabulous helpers. Most importantly is that not only was a good time had by all, but also that yet another young kid-friendly activity /venue was found to advertise here for the residents of The Hague and close surrounding area.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

December 27, 2016

Aquagates and Aquaways, My Collection Grows…

Regular readers will know that I love quirky things like funny shaped letterboxes, street paver brick patterns in the road or on buildings and painted electrical substations.  I also love wraught iron drain covers and the patterns on them. Today’s post is about a drain cover that I thought I had photographed as a duplicate of an earlier post. But something kept me from deleting these photos, and just as well because they were not the same at all. The first one has the word ” aquagate” and the second “aquaway” but both sport the logo of the Hague, the stork. I m deleighted to hav  new “find” and my collection slowly grows…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

A Stylized Logo Of A Beautiful Bird…

December 26, 2016

A Sight I Wish I Could Wish For Communities All Over The World…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Recycling has always been a big thing in The Netherlands.

For decades in every neighbourhood has sported large bins, usually in threes, one for paper, one for clear glass and one for coloured glass.

Many plastic bottles have a fee on them that can be reclaimed by delivering the empty bottle back at your local supermarket. There was always a “green bin” collection too,  for food scraps.

Then in recent years the recycling effort was ramped up several notches, with the addition of plastic recycling points: this time, plastic like cling film, grocery plastic packaging wrappings and the like.

Large household items like whitewares: fridges, washing machines etc have a special tax included in the new purchase price that covers the cost of dealing with disposal at the end of it, and there is a system where large items of household furniture can be taken away from off the street by your door  by the city council after you have made an appointment for a removal date.

Tradition states for this last one that the goods must be put onto the street the evening before, usually more than one item is put out at once and then one of two things happen (sometimes both) first: others who have not made an appointment add their large metal or wood furniture to the pile or second, other people spy something that they can make use of and take it away. I have to say that sometimes people throw away things in surprisingly good state so it’s a brilliant system and it’s always a topic of conversation if someone scores something especially good this way.

I’ve grown to love this system, and recycling in general so the next step in the “green” revolution was exciting too, even if it took a little bit of getting used to at first.  It used to be that our rubbish bags for things that can not currently be recycled were collected once per week from our door step. The last year or two has seen the springing up in every street or two, rows of two or three underground containers topped with smaller tops where the bags are inserted. Now you walk to one of these whenever your rubbish bag is full and drop it off into the container.

In the first weeks it felt strange not to be piling bags on the street on the set day, but the advantages quickly became apparent: now there was no chance for the seagulls to indulge their habit of tearing open the bags and scattering rubbish far and wide. In summer months bags didn’t sit starting to smell ripe on balconies waiting for rubbish day, and if you were due to go on holiday on a Tuesday and your collection day was always a Friday then there was not longer the hassle of asking neighbours to deal with it.

We quickly got use to this system and love the ease and convenience. Older people can take a small walk and dispose of rubbish every day if they wish, if you have a large family event you can deal with almost all aspects of the recycling  in one go. The “green bin” for household scraps is still collected on a set day each week, but seeing these little green boxes popping up not only in my city but also nation wide, is a sight that I wish I could wish for communities all over the world.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

December 24, 2016

Mind Is Being Tricked, Your Body Is Cautious “Just In Case”…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

It wasn’t just the exhibits in Museon’s ” Illusions” exhibition that was messing with our minds, it was the floor too.

The carpet depicted all sorts of patterns that distorted our idea of what was real and what was not, making us uneasy even when we knew that it was an optical illusion and “just” carpet.

One such pattern could be described as the entrance to a vortex, you got the impression that there was a black hole in front of you.

Of course, it was just a carpet pattern but it was interesting how many people still kept to the outer edge rather than taking the more direct route straight through it.

Other illusions included a four sided pyramid, undulating lines that gave the effect of undulating hills or dunes, a serpentine “tube” that snaked around the room but which was of course entirely flat, and a ramp. All of these were best experienced first hand, the camera does not show off the true genius of the details, depth and pattern, and of course where you were in the room and your distance from one illusionary effect to another made a difference too.

The entire experience was rather surreal, you knew you were being tricked but your body wanted to be cautious “just in case”. It’s like we trust our minds , but only so far… then we take steps to hedge our bets. Himself and I totally enjoyed this and were pleased that our lunch time visit was time well spent.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

December 23, 2016

Life’s Illusions I Recall…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Following yesterday’s post,  whilst visiting the The Museon Illusions exhibition, Himself and I were drawn to several of the displays.

One of them consists of three wooden blocks that are curved on both sides. There are some small pegs on the wall and the three pieces are stacked one on top of another.

The accompanying plaque ask which of these pieces of wood is the largest.

There is then an instruction to remove the pieces and put them together see if we are correct or not.

We did this and to our amazement every single piece is the same size.

It is explained “this illusion is called the “Jastrow illusion” and is named after the nineteenth century psychologist Joseph Jastrow, who did a lot of research into visual perception.”

Then there are the series of four illustrations, each of which has more than one picture hidden within it.

Himself and I stood and laughed as we pointed out one an then the other, some being instantly obvious and me in fits because one Himself could not manage to see for the life of him. It’s interesting how our brains can manage to play tricks on us sometimes.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Two faces or a vase?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Lady in back and white, or man in black playing the saxophone..

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Duck or rabbit?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Cat or mouse?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Young woman or old?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

December 22, 2016

Our Senses Betray Us So Easily…

Earlier this year Himself and I visited the Illusion Exhibition at Museon in the Hague. The exhibition deals with not just visual illusions but also those that fool or distort all of our senses, using everything from mirrors to perspective, movement, touch and taste.
There are many interesting parts to the exhibition, detailing the science behind each of the displays.  It was  very informative and in some ways rather surreal, that simple situations and triggers could so alter the way our senses perform and how they can betray us so easily.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

December 19, 2016

We Need Electric Cars To Come In An Assortment Of Larger Sizes…

Electric cars are catching on fast in The Netherlands. In the past year whilst on our way to medical appointments, or to family or friends, I have seen more and more of them, sitting at their distinctive charging stations on the street. I can count quite a few in close vicinity to our home, more in the larger area and many around the city.  Himself and I would jump at the chance of an electric vehicle, if only they made them in a seven seater edition. We not only fill our car to the brim with kids on a regular basis, but also carry around a wheelchair for me to use whenever we have to negotiate distances larger then I can manage on crutches. The wheelchair takes up a ridiculous amount of space, especially if we need to pack in groceries or luggage and a few kids as well.  We need the combination of boot space and seats that our current car gives us. Himself and I both hope that electic cars come out in an assortment of larger sizes as quickly as possible, it would be amazing to have one of our own.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

December 18, 2016

“Rarely Seen”, So Many To Choose…

In this, the last installment of Museon’s National Geographic exhibition “Rarely Seen”, I have collated a few of the images I found to be most memorable.  Of course I could fit more of the origional photographs in if I had resisted the urge to take additional close-up images of the photographs, but you know mw I could not resist. the level of detail in some of the images just begged for a deeper look,  in fact, in some of the images you could look over and over again and ever time find something new to amaze you. That’s what tells you that these are National Geographic worthy, and why my “point and shoot” efforts never will be. Still, it doesn’t mean that I can not appreciate these photographs,  in fact I think it makes me appreciate them even more. One thing is for certain, my second-hand reproduction of these is a poor relation when compared to standing looking at the real thing. If this exhibition ever comes somewhere near to where you live, I would througherly recommend a visit.  They were on display here between 21 April and 28 August 2016 and may have run their course here in The Hague, but these will always be inspirational. One final time, the same note as before: the artists name is in bold type, the text came with the exhibition.
ICE CAVE.
Ian Plant, Wisconsin.
A ceiling of icicles frames the intrepid photographer on the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore, Wisconsin. Known as the Jewels of Lake Superior, during the winter, needles of ice hang from the sea cave ceilings. The widespread caves along the lakeshore form as freezing and thawing conditions and wave action shape the sandstone of the Devils Island Formation.

(photograph © Ian Plant)

(photograph © Ian Plant)

(photograph © Ian Plant)

(photograph © Ian Plant)

(photograph © Ian Plant)

(photograph © Ian Plant)

ICE FORMATIONS.
Chip Phillips, Canadian Rockies.
Winter’s dance with the cold can be seen in cracks stretching towards the horizon on a lake in Canada’s Rocky Mountains. Repeated freezing and thawing create striking geometric patterns on the surface ice.

(photograph © Chip Phillips)

(photograph © Chip Phillips)

(photograph © Chip Phillips)

(photograph © Chip Phillips)

(photograph © Chip Phillips)

(photograph © Chip Phillips)

(photograph © Chip Phillips)

(photograph © Chip Phillips)

(photograph © Chip Phillips)

(photograph © Chip Phillips)

PURPLE HAZE.
Guy Tal, Utah.
A rare carpet of purple flowers spreads towards a distant butte. Every few years, when winter snow and spring warmth create the ideal conditions, this stretch of the Mojave Desert bursts into colour with bee plant and scorpion weed. The view is best enjoyed from a distance — bee plant has an unpleasant odour and scorpion weed is named for its bite, which can cause a reaction similar to poison ivy.

(photograph © Guy Tal)

(photograph © Guy Tal)

(photograph © Guy Tal)

(photograph © Guy Tal)

(photograph © Guy Tal)

(photograph © Guy Tal)

THE NORTHERN LIGHTS.
Marc Adamus, Canada.
The green glow of an aurora reflects off a frozen lakeshore in Canada’s Yukon Territory. In this composite image, the aurora shows off one of its most common colours. Electrically charged particles from the sun enter our atmosphere and interact with gases above the magnetic poles to form these rippling curtains of lights.

(photograph © Marc Adamus)

(photograph © Marc Adamus)

(photograph © Marc Adamus)

(photograph © Marc Adamus)

(photograph © Marc Adamus)

(photograph © Marc Adamus)

(photograph © Marc Adamus)

(photograph © Marc Adamus)

FROZEN ICE.
Glenn Nagel, Michigan.
A full moon stands guard over the St. Joseph North Pier Lighthouse in Saint Joseph, Michigan. Crashing waves against the pier during the cold winter of 2013 built up layers of ice and created a frozen dreamscape on the shore of Lake Michigan.

(photograph © Glenn Nagel)

(photograph © Glenn Nagel)

(photograph © Glenn Nagel)

(photograph © Glenn Nagel)

(photograph © Glenn Nagel)

(photograph © Glenn Nagel)

ROOM WITH A VIEW.
Manuel Paz-Castanal, Spain.
From across the street, a photographer captures visitors at the opening of a photography exhibit in Santiago de Compostela, Spain, enjoying some fresh air along with the art works. The city, a pilgrimage site in northwest Spain, is known for its beautiful old centre.

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

SPLASH.
Aytul Akbas, Turkey.
A brewing storm sends waves splashing over a retaining wall in Kocaeli Province, Turkey. As the winds picked up, a passer-by’s rainbow umbrella turned inside out.

(photograph © Aytul Akbas)

(photograph © Aytul Akbas)

(photograph © Aytul Akbas)

(photograph © Aytul Akbas)

(photograph © Aytul Akbas)

(photograph © Aytul Akbas)

NEBRA SKY DISK.
Kenneth Garrett
The setting sun reflects off this sky disk in central Germany. Buried on the Mittelberg hill near the town of Nebra in 1600 B.C., the disk tracks the sun’s movement along the horizon. It’s the oldest known depiction of the cosmos and may have served as an agricultural and spiritual calendar.

(photograph © Kenneth Garrett)

(photograph © Kenneth Garrett)

(photograph © Kenneth Garrett)

(photograph © Kenneth Garrett)

RAYONG DAM.
Tonnaja Anan Charoenkal, Thailand.
Fishermen look like just a drop in the water standing inside the overflow spillway of the Khlong Yai Reservoir in Rayong, southern Thailand. This dam provides the region with inexpensive electrical power.

(photograph © Tonnaja Anan Charoenkal)

(photograph © Tonnaja Anan Charoenkal

(photograph © Tonnaja Anan Charoenkal)

(photograph © Tonnaja Anan Charoenkal)

December 17, 2016

Their Name Might “Rarely Seen”, But They Shouldn’t Be…

I’ve been “condensing” some of the photographs from Museon’s “Rarely Seen” exhibition that took place in The Hague earlier this year. Running from  21 April 2016  to 28 August 2016, Himself and I agreed that some of these images left a lasting impression, and that there you have to be a seriously talented photographer to have your work chosen by the National Geographic. In my penaltimate post my method remains the same as the previous two posts: the photographer name is shown in bold type and the texts shown are those that were given by the exhibition. Enjoy!

Part Three of our visit this year to Museon’s National Geographic exhibition entitled “Rarely Seen”.
Per the other two posts, the name of the photographer has been highlighted in bold and photo credit given.

EGRET EATING.
Erlend Haarberg
A great white egret’s bill mimics a sharp pair of chopsticks as it snags a fish from the water.

(photograph © Erlend Haarberg)

(photograph © Erlend Haarberg)

(photograph © Erlend Haarberg)

(photograph © Erlend Haarberg)

(Kiwi’s note: from the look on it’s face, I think this fish knows exactly what kind of trouble he is in…)

GREEN PIANO.
Tomas Munita, Japan.
Tender leaves cover a piano in Odaka, Japan. The piano is just a small piece of the radioactive debris left from the March 2011 tsunami and subsequent meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. While the government has vowed that evacuees will be able to return one day, the disaster clean-up has been frustrating and slow.

(photograph © Tomas Munita)

(photograph © Tomas Munita)

(photograph © Tomas Munita)

(photograph © Tomas Munita)

(photograph © Tomas Munita)

(photograph © Tomas Munita)

HEADS UP.
Fabi Fliervoet
A Boeing 747 comes in for a landing on the small Caribbean island of St. Martin. Planes fly directly over Maho Beach and give visitors and plane-spotters a thrill as the jets fly almost too close for comfort above this sun-kissed tourist destination.

(photograph © Fabi Fliervoet)

(photograph © Fabi Fliervoet)

(photograph © Fabi Fliervoet)

(photograph © Fabi Fliervoet)

(photograph © Fabi Fliervoet)

(photograph © Fabi Fliervoet)

LEMUR LEAP.
Stephen Alvarez, Madagascar.
Lemurs perch like ghosts in a limestone forest in western Madagascar’s Tsingy de Bemaraha National Park and Reserve. The stone, laid down in the Jurassic period, has been weathered into spires and slot canyons, creating isolated microhabitats for this endangered lemur species, known as Von der Decken’s sifaka.

(photograph © Stephen Alvarez)

(photograph © Stephen Alvarez)

PRESIDENT OBAMA SITS FOR HIS 3-D PORTRAIT.
Pete Souza, Washington, D.C.
Inspired by a life mask of Lincoln, the Smithsonian Institution asked President Obama to be the first American president to pose for a 3-D portrait. The data were used to create a 3-D bust.

(photograph © Pete Souza)

(photograph © Pete Souza)

PUDDLE JUMPER.
Dave Kan, Australia.
A wild kangaroo bounds across the surface of a Queensland lake at sunset. The hopper and the trees on the shore are the only break between the vivid sky and the reflective waters.

(photograph © Dave Kan)

(photograph © Dave Kan)

(photograph © Dave Kan)

(photograph © Dave Kan)

RAIN, RAIN GO AWAY.
Andrew Suryono, Indonesia.
An orangutan creates an umbrella out of a banana leaf to hide from the rain in Bali, Indonesia. Wild populations of the endangered primate are under threat from habitat destruction, as their natural ranges are being destroyed for agriculture and timber harvests.

(photograph © Andrew Suryono)

(photograph © Andrew Suryono)

(photograph © Andrew Suryono)

(photograph © Andrew Suryono)

ROYAL WHITE TIGER.
Tim Flach, Studio Shot.
An intimate portrait captures a white tiger’s quiet fierceness. Tigers are often bred in captivity for various colour variations, which rarely occur in the wild.

(photograph © Tim Flach)

(photograph © Tim Flach)

(photograph © Tim Flach)

(photograph © Tim Flach)

(photograph © Tim Flach)

(photograph © Tim Flach)

(photograph © Tim Flach)

(photograph © Tim Flach)

(photograph © Tim Flach)

(photograph © Tim Flach)

(photograph © Tim Flach)

(photograph © Tim Flach)

SHAOLIN MONKS.
Steve McCurry
Buddhist monks in training hang upside down in Shaolin Monastery in Zhengzhou, China. The monks practice their faith through martial arts in a form known as Shaolin Kung Fu. Used for defence, the practice is marked by self-restraint and refined movement.

(photograph © Steve McCurry)

(photograph © Steve McCurry)

STANDING STONES.
Helen Hotson, England.
The Men-an-Tol stones near Penzance in Cornwall, England, contain echoes of earlier times. The megalithic rocks, possibly part of an ancient circle, have no clear explanation. Local legend holds that a person who passes through the rare holed stone can be cured of many ailments including rickets and back problems.

(photograph © Helen Hotson)

(photograph © Helen Hotson)

(photograph © Helen Hotson)

(photograph © Helen Hotson)

(photograph © Helen Hotson)

(photograph © Helen Hotson)

UNDERWATER SCULPTURE GARDEN.
Jason deCaires Taylor,  Mexico.
A bed of sea grass shelters the sculptures of “The Anchors” at the Museum of Underwater Art. The pieces depict the heads of anchors from NBCs TV show Today. Located in the National Marine Park of Cancun, Isla Mujeres, and Punta Nizuc in Mexico, this sculpture garden serves as an artificial reef. Artist Jason deCaires Taylor conceived of the dive site as an attraction to help relieve pressure on nearby coral reefs.

(photograph © Jason deCaires Taylor)

(photograph © Jason deCaires Taylor)

(photograph © Jason deCaires Taylor)

(photograph © Jason deCaires Taylor)

(photograph © Jason deCaires Taylor)

(photograph © Jason deCaires Taylor)

SAILING STONES.
Eric Harrison
Sailing stones leave trails in the cracked mud of Racetrack Playa in Death Valley National Park. Moved by small pools of water formed by ice melted in the morning sun, these “sailing” stones have confounded viewers for years.

(photograph © Eric Harrison)

(photograph © Eric Harrison)

(photograph © Eric Harrison)

(photograph © Eric Harrison)

WATER WORLD
Rakesh Rocky
An ant pushes a spherical droplet of water down a paved path, and in the process the droplet creates a mirrored reflection of the ant’s world. With more than 10,000 known ant species, these social insects play an important ecological role by aerating soils and dispersing seeds.

(photograph © Rakesh Rocky)

(photograph © Rakesh Rocky)

(photograph © Rakesh Rocky)

(photograph © Rakesh Rocky)

(photograph © Rakesh Rocky)

(photograph © Rakesh Rocky)

Looking forward to the last set tomorrow!

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