Local Heart, Global Soul

December 16, 2018

Two Wheels And Whicker Baskets…

It’s not surprising that I get a lot of bicycle photographs whilst out and about. The Netherlands is of course famous for it’s large numbers of bike ownership and use. Outside the “New Farm” urban garden building, the cycle stands are full and the flow of people leaving with bikes is quickly balanced by those arriving on their bikes. One cycle has a basket that catches my eye. It’s a large wicker basket and I am drawn to the pattern. I take photographs for my artistic reference drawing files. Whilst I can’t cycle, I love the fact that so many other people here do. Here is to the two wheeled more of transport, and to beautiful wicker baskets!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

December 13, 2018

A Glimpse Into The Workings On An Unusual Rooftop…

Following our tour of “The New Farm” fish farm, my friends and the rest of the tour party take the stairs upstairs. I have my crutches instead of the wheelchair, but these steps will be beyond me. The staff here have an alternative route for me that is not usually open to the public. This route takes a small lift to the roof  level and is the “back way” through the glass houses and growing areas. This gives me a unique view on how the vegies and herbs are grown here. There is another large glass house behind me, I’m not allowed to enter it but see through the closed wall that it’s full of sweet pepper plants and thousands of peppers. I didn’t get photographs of those because we had to moving foreword with the staff member. I asked about taking photographs, explained about my blog and was told that taking photographs would be fine. The space on the roof is larger than I first thought it was looking up from street level, and it shows just how much can be grown on top of one building, and how much more we could do if more commercial and residential buildings were built with rooftop gardens.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

December 12, 2018

Not Your Average Fish Tank…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The next part of our “The New Farm” visit is a fish farm!

It’s most unexpected to see this inside a city high rise building but apparently this is perfectly suited as in industry to work alongside fruit and veggies.

All of the guests on the tour don apparel to keep the environment clean and proceed on a tour of the tanks.

The fish we see are larger because the tiny ones in the “nursery” are more delicate and are kept apart from the public.

I can’t climb the ladder to look inside the tanks but I’m tall enough to hold the camera up high and then shoot photographs from all angles until I get some lucky shots.

(I checked photography was allowed, apparently it doesn’t bother the fish at all).

The fish are checked multiple times per day and if any fish is looking like it’s getting too big then it is relocated into a tank for fish it’s size. The absolute genius of this system is that the plants upstairs are farmed hydroponically, the water comes down from upstairs and is cleaned via a set of filters, the drop of the water also oxygenates the water for the fish, the water from the fish contains fish droppings which is in turn pumped upstairs to feed the plants. Both the plants and the fish benefit from this method of farming. The fish are sold to local restaurants and residents. It’s a win-win situation and both types of farming have a low “food miles” footprint. ingenious!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

December 11, 2018

Rising Markets…

Visiting the “New Farm”, an urban garden in the Hague, is an eye opening experience. Urban gardening is an excellent idea, bringing use to former office spaces, growing food literally around the corner or a few kilometres away from the people who eat it. We go three quarters of the way up the building where there is a large balcony that looks over the city. It’s wide enough for a small market, where local artisan food producers can set up a stall and sell their produce. Of course as avid foodies, our friends and I take a look…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Views from the balcony…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

December 10, 2018

New Farm, When Urban Gardening Reaches New Heights…

There is a new revolution going on around the world, where people are trying to cut down on the “food miles”  generated by the food we eat. By this it is meant the number of miles/kilometres that are between where there food is produced and where it is consumed. This means things cutting down on food transport wherever possible. This has meant the development of Urban gardens, and The Hague is no different. An old office building has been partly converted to become a place where fresh vegetables are grown and the name of this enterprise is “The New Farm.” Amazingly the farm produces not just tomatoes and peppers but also herbs and fish! I went with friends to take a look two summers ago, and also, of course to buy some local vegetables.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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