Local Heart, Global Soul

March 8, 2014

Keeping My Feet From Getting Wet…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Windmills have been an iconic part of  Dutch culture and a necessary part of Dutch life for centuries.

Maybe people know that a good deal of  the Netherlands lies undersea level but what many people don’t realise, is just how high the natural water table is in most of the country.

Mills and modern pumping stations work  and monitor twenty-four hours a day and three hundred and sixty-five days of the year to  regulate the water-table so that it does not simply rise to it’s “natural” level and therefore give Dutch citizens wet feet.

This is achieved by pumping water off the land and into the surrounding canal system at a constant rate, the water is directed though the canal network and pumped out into the sea with every low tide.

During especially high tides in Spring and Autumn the sea levels are so high that often it’s difficult to open the gates to release the “inland” water, and this puts the whole system under pressure.

This pressure is often alleviated by the installation of modern technology, faster pumps, the elevation of old dykes and the installation of flood plains where excess water can be directed in emergencies.

Sometimes water can be held at high levels in canals until it can be released into the sea, but one thing is for certain, water management in the Netherlands is very much a full time job. In fact it even has it’s own government department.

The polders (reclaimed land) are of course something that the Dutch are world famous for and there is a half serious side to the popular saying ” God created the world but the Dutch created Holland.

“Molen” (mills) were wind powered but were not only used to pump water, amongst other things they also provided the energy for saw mills or helped mill flour. I like the old style molen, they have charactor and personality. They come in all sorts of shapes and sizes and they are a necessary part of the historical and current Dutch working lanscape.  Here therefore in this last post from Zaans Schans is my tribute to the humble Dutch mill….

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

March 7, 2014

Now Let’s Wiggle Those Tail Feathers!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Patterns are funny things,  either natural or man made: some you love, some you hate and some just for better or for worse amaze.

Things in nature often have patterns that are beautiful in their detail and colour, such as the brilliant greens and blues in a peacock’s plumage, the patterns in leaves and trees, the markings in rock and stone.

Here in Zaans Schans there is an area of polder called the Klaverpolder ,  “klaver” translates as “clover” and an information board gives at least as good a definition of “polder” as I can:

This polder (an area of reclaimed land) is a typical example of the soft boggy pasture land of the region: long narrow parcels of low-lying land surrounded by drainage channels. The water in the (this) polder, now a nature reserve, is regulated by watermills.”

This is the area of the museum where the working farm buildings have been placed together, there is also a small working farm and “childrens’ zoo” where sheep, goats, chickens, ducks etc  can be seen at close quarters, and the workings of a farm explained.  The cow  in the farmyard is however made of fibreglass and fitted with rubber teats so that children can try out their milking skills, something that Little Mr. found was harder to do than it first looked.

Feeding the chickens and the goats made us some firm friends (for as long as the food supply lasted) and got me up close to some chickens who’s plumage was a work of art not only in the way only covered the birds body but also in the shape and colour of the patterns it made whilst doing so. Even the chicken that looked from afar like it was plain black in colour, revealed itself to be a range of beautiful mottled shades of browns and black at close range.

I attempt to get close and study the complex and beautiful arrangement of feathers,  Mother Nature is most certainly without doubt a genius pattern designer, both in form and function. The children are quick to explore the  farmyard and to take the opportunity to run around and burn off some energy, the sun is now out and more people are suddenly also out and about around us.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

March 6, 2014

The Very Strange Mixture Of Wonder And Disbelief…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Tourist shops are tourist shops: piled high with merchandise that can generally be classified as “the good, the bad and the ugly”…

…or more often ” the ugly, the useless and ugly and the both tasteless, useless and ugly”.

Here in Zaans Schans it’s running pretty much to the rule, there are a few tasteful  things and a ton of tat, but most of all there are shoes: tons and tons of wooden shoes.

I’m not an ornamental type of gal, the porcelain figures of the cute kitsch Dutch boy kissing the cute kitsch Dutch girl are light-years from what I would call a stunning addition to my home.

But each to their own… someone must like them and buy them or things like these wouldn’t be on sale in Dutch tourist shops.

Personally I wouldn’t object to a pair of klompen (clogs / wooden shoes) , but my pair of choice would preferably be old, even antique, very well used, plain in style and have been clearly worn. They would have ( preferably long)  history and character. Imagine my shock therefore when I came around the corner of the corridor in the museum and discovered the tourist shop. “Wall to Wall” clogs is n understatement… it’s wall to wall and floor to ceiling and the entire ceiling covered with clogs. The loft space of the building is visible and even that is a storage space for clogs.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

You name a shoe size and they will surely have clogs here to fit, I can seriously say I have never seen so many clogs in one space, and in fact I hazard a guess that some regular Dutch shoe shops have less pairs than this. From a photographic point of view it’s fascinating,  from a personal point of view I’m cringing, it’s like a weird melange of  “Oh Wow!” and “Ew!” at the same time.

At one end of the room it’s possible to see a demonstration of how the clogs are made, as I stand taking photographs a young man comes and carves out a little more on a clog mounted on a lathe nearby. I find the rough, less hewn pairs more fascinating than the shiny, glossy, painted finished pairs.

I also like the decoration on the old metal till better than the little porcelain blue and white windmills.  Sigh, having confessed that must I now relinquish my Dutch nationality? Is this treason? These clogs are fascinating: I wonder on earth buys them all, do they actually try and wear them? ( I wouldn’t mind being a fly on the wall when they did because surely these can’t be correctly fitted or comfortable?) …do they hang them on the wall? …do they park pot plants in them? .. or are they shoved in the back of a cupboard or adorn the cistern on the loo?

I have a smile on my face… one of wonder and disbelief, but each to their own I suppose: what scares me in this room obviously makes a lot of other tourists very, very happy indeed. Mind you, upon reflection maybe it’s me that’s the odd one out here, after all I adore old tools and patterns on street drain covers… One thing is for certain: The object that is one man’s nightmare is another’s dream, and wht not? … each to their own.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

March 5, 2014

From The Stunningly Beautiful To The Dreadfully Bizarre….

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Everyone knows that a special occasion such as a wedding is often a time when people splash out on a new outfit and shoes.

This is not a modern tradition, and in fact, in one respect grooms have less hard work to do in preparing for their nuptials now than in times of old.

Here in the museum at Zaans Schans, back in the summer of 2012 I learned lots of new things about Dutch traditions to do with “klompen” (clogs / wooden shoes) such asone information board tells me:

” If you were to be married on Marken or elsewhere a unique task awaited the bridegroom- this was to carve a pair of clogs by hand.

Beautiful motifs often with a symbolical meaning were used, sometimes the brides name and wedding date were engraved, and after many. many hours of intensive work an exclusive gift for the bride -to-be was created. The beautiful clogs were worn with pride once the pair were engaged.  The Marken bridegroom used many motifs and patterns in his carvings. Varying from figurative to symbolical – such as the bird which symbolizes fertility: and geometric to semi-abstract – such as the use of rosettes, stars, interwoven hearts, spirals and knots. Incredibly time consuming, the clogs are a true expression of love!”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Religion also determined footwear in centuries past, another information board tells me: ” Church clogs from Hindeloopen (1675)  These wooden shoes are about 300 years old, dating back to the period of early Hindeloopen folk art. At that time religion determined he lives of the people, more so than it does now- even footwear was decorated with biblical images. In this case the right clog shows “The lost son in grief” and the left “The lost son in splendour“.

It’s hard to get a photograph though the glass of the cabinet, but the colour and detail is exquisite…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Platijnen”In the middle ages the wooden sandal developed into the “pattern”or “platijnen”. the “pattern”served as overshoe in which a thin slipper was worn. The metal platform meant that leather shoes and garments made less contact with street dirt. These “platijnen”date back to the 15th century.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Elegant carved, possibly bridal clogs, acquired in 2001, presumed to be from East Friesland, just over the German border.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

And other clog from around Europe are sometimes just as ornate: These are from the Pyrenees area of France.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

A special hatchet for clog makers (with a tilted handle) used to chop the rough clog shape out of a block of wood. Three special scooped chisels/drills are used to hollow out the foot opening.

It’s also worth noting that the “tourist” clog  that can be bought in many a Dutch souvenir shop differs vastly in fit to “real” klompen still worn today on farms, docks etc as proper working shoes. People who work in klompen have appointments with the makers who custom fit the inside of the clog so that it fits the wearer perfectly, so no rough edges and hard uncomfortable bits in their shoes, unlike the poor tourist who is generally lumbered with the “one size fits all” version.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Of course where you have the sublime you will usually also find the ridiculous: The Dutch have a sense of humour and this is reflected in their klompen… from mimicking leather shoes to the rather unsteady looking high heeled clog, there are also a selection on display that range from the funny to the cringe-worthy…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

March 4, 2014

The Humble, But Hard Working Wooden Shoe…

Filed under: Historical,PHOTOGRAPHY,THE NETHERLANDS,Zaanse Schans — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Here in Zaans Schans, located a short distance from Amsterdam an a short distance  past Schipol airport, the museums’ curators have tried to make as much of the historic buildings as they can.

In this particular area they have made a set of 18th Century storage barns and warehouses formerly used for storing grain and dry goods into museum, souvenir and catering buildings and have been laid out to form a central square.

The buildings themselves are wooden because this was the most convenient building material for the soft peaty soil in this area and they were tarred for protection against mildew. Now theta they are protected against the damp they have to stand up to the tourist hordes.

The weather has been fickle and so it’s quiet here today, so although some areas are busy we have other areas almost all to ourselves. In the “klompenmakerij” (wooden shoe / clog workshop) there is also a museum that details the history of  “klompen” (clogs) and shows just how much of an integral part of Dutch life they were. Certainly as “working shoes” they were owned by almost every man, woman and child and there were many companies making them around the Netherlands to keep up with demand. Klompen were also not just confined to The Netherlands in centuries past, as working shoes they were also worn extensively in Belgium, France, Germany and many other European countries.

One thing I did not realise before though were the regional differences in the styles and shapes of the klompen… the large glass display cabinets hold many examples of both local and even some international examples.  The wooden shoe may be humble but it’s got a long and colourful history…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

March 3, 2014

A Barrel Full Of Inspiration…

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY,THE NETHERLANDS,Zaanse Schans — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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This post panders more to my artistic whims than anything else. Strewn all around the cooperage at Zaans Schans there are barrels and barrel related equipment. Most of the barrels appear to be remnants of orders long since filled, some have the names of companies stamped or branded into their sides, there are many intact ones as there are ones in pieces, all for me are beautiful. This is therefore another post for my personal artistic inspiration file… not a barrel of monkeys or a barrel of laughs amongst them but for me, more than a barrel of inspiration…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

March 2, 2014

History And The Changing Times Have Dying Occupations Over a Barrel…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

It gives me great sadness when I discover the death of an occupation. A craft, a set of specialised skills, a trade that was often passed down from Father to Son, gone, leaving behind a long history of hard work forged in fire and with wood.

Such is the case of cooperage at Zaans Schans. Coopers make wooden barrels, barrels that were used in days gone by for the transport and storage of all sorts of goods both locally and worldwide.

Whilst barrels rolled well on stone quays and streets in the centuries before and just after the Industrial Revolution, their round forms did not make for the the most ergonomic shape when filling ships holds and the invention of the shipping container was the one of the many contributors to the death knells of the cooperage industry.

In the case of  Zaans Schans I find a little building that houses the full workings of a cooperage intact. From the information boards I learn:

In the building you see the interior from the barrels and cooperage trade SR Tiemstra Oostzanerwerf & Sons. On the death of the last cooper, Jaap Tiemstra in 1999, he left behind a completely intact cooperage. It’s intriguing to see not just how the craft of the cooper  was put together, but to also catch a breath of the spirit of the cooper in the interior.

Cooperage Tiemstra was established in 1919 by Jaaps’  father Simon Tiemstra. Jaap ran the company together with his brother until 1987. This coopery was a so-called “wet coopery” which means that they made containers for wet goods such as herring, beer and other liquors. After the nineteen fifties demand fell considerably for wooden barrels.

It’s not just the making of barrels that have become a dying trade. so too slowly but surely have the canalside saw-mills once littered the banks of Dutch canals.

Powered by the wind energy of the wind mills above the wood milling buildings these mills were one of the main reasons for centuries of Dutch supremacy at sea, sailing ships could be quickly built and repaired both in times of war and peace because the wind automated much of the milling process that other nations were still carrying out by hand.

The Dutch rather literally made the wind into their economic power-house and the wood produced was used in the building all matter of things , not least  ships, barges and barrels.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Some information referring to an antique photograph tells me: ” Schuitenmakerij Brouwer:  This work shed originally belonged to the ship-maker company Widow K. Brouwer located at the Rustenburg in Zaandam.

In 1964 the shed was to have been demolished in favour of the building if the new headquarters of Albert Heijn Supermarkets.

In 1967 the  shed was rebuilt at  Zaanse Schans. The original shipyard was founded in 1857 by Klaas Brouwer.

After Worlds War I the company specialised in the construction of barges.

At that time  there were still a great number of wind-sawmills, and timber merchants established in the Westzijderveld.

Almost all the timber shipped in at the harbour of Zaandam was bought to the processors and merchants by  hundreds of barges. Of course, as evidenced by one of my blog posts a few days ago,  barge traffic is still very big business on Dutch waterways,  especially for raw materials , so the industry itself didn’t disappear but it  is true that it is no longer visible in it’s old state either: The many hundreds of old wooden barges have been replaced with fewer but far larger vessels, steel giants that transport tonnages that their old wooden forbearers could only have dreamt about.

Keep Up, Change or Die… the mantra of trade and industry throughout the ages. Sometimes we inevitably hold ourselves over a barrel.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

March 1, 2014

Surprising Details Come In Threes…

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY,THE NETHERLANDS,Zaanse Schans — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The thing that surprised me more than everything else when I visited Zaans Schans  turned out to not be something on any of the information boards, but something rather subtle and indirect.  The surprising thing is that almost all of the buildings that have been relocated to Zaans Schans are made of wood.

I live in The Hague, one of the large Dutch cities and like any town or city of decent size in The Netherlands you’d be hard pushed to find houses that are built of wood.

Brick is the predominant building material in Europe, less prone to the ravages of fire, sturdier and more readily available than wood, brick  (and more modern materials like concrete) is still one of the mainstays of  Dutch architecture.

It’s therefore unusual to me to see so many wooden buildings relocated here, possibly it’s because they didn’t originate from city areas, or it’s just co-incidence, but who knows the real reason?

Another new item of information comes from one of the information boards dotted around Zaans Schans: “The street design at the Zaanse Schans is typical of the region’s unban planning until the late 19th century with wealthy merchants’ houses along the dike and labourers’cottages set at right angles along the water drainage channels, made accessible by small bridges.”

My interest is more piqued by some of the quirky details: for instance, instead of what we could now call a “bay window” some of the houses have a front facing window with a diagonal one each side of it, that cut the corners off the front facing room, under the windows that cut the corners are triangular window ledges… something I find quirky and have never seen before.

These strange windows would make sense to me if there were more windows on the right angled wall but there are none, and even quirkier, often these corner-cutting windows are not symmetrical on both sides of the front facing window either.

The I go from mind bending carpentry to mind bending nature: the kids discover a tree that appears from it’s top half foliage to be thriving, but goodness knows how because  it also appears that about 90% of the inner trunk area is missing…

Skinny Little Mr lost not time squeezing himself into the gap and spying through the lower knot hole.  I ask him to remove himself since I imagine the poor tree has difficulties enough surviving without spindly children imposing themselves at such close quarters, although I do admit that a comedy scene where a tree appears to talk could be rigged quite easily under different circumstances and probably with very amusing results.

It’s certainly a prime example of nature’s tenacity… bravo little tree!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 28, 2014

For Me, A Knippenbruggen Really IS A Bridge Too Far…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Three years on crutches has produced in me a bit of a split personality: On one hand I’m determined to get out and about whenever I can because  otherwise I would go stir crazy sitting inside all the time and on the other I’ve become super cautious, fearing any activity or action that could extend my exiting physical damage or add it it in any way.

I’ve lost count of how many activities my family have done without me,  I’ve stayed at home whilst they have taken the tent and gone camping for the weekend, gone to the beach for a paddle,  or cycling and walking.

My outings necessitate the use of our car and there are limits to the distances I can walk from it once we are out.

Generally what happens is I walk as much as I can because I want to make the most of being “out” , usually that involves over-doing it a bit because I’m determined to make the most of my outing and then I  suffer the consequences for days afterwards as my foot and back complain about the extended exercise I have subjected them to.

Usually it’s worth it, It gives me some family life outside the four walls of home, but there are many situations when we are out where I need to put on the brakes and say “whoa… maybe not”.

This was one such occasion: I wanted to go and investigate the beautiful gardens on the other side of the canals,  so gingerly negotiate the humped-backed bridge to do so. Hmmm, I reach the top of the bridge, it’s steeper than I anticipated and because of the rain, slipperier too.

Alarm bells start to ring. I’m not even going to try to continue down the other side, it’s way too risky and not only that, how on earth an I going to get back down again?  Himself is a little way ahead of me but luckily Little Mr. has been sprinting around the French garden I have just taken photographs of.

I send him off to fetch Himself and hold the handrail very tight whilst I await rescue. Himself approaches laughing and then looks dismayed when he sees where I’m perched. “Don’t move” he orders worried, (err, as if I was about to start dancing on the handrail or something?). Between his steadying firm arm and the handrail I slowly descend and am soon back on the flat ground again feeling very relieved.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

There is an information board that tells me:

Hump-backed bridges known as “kippenbruggen” and flat bridges known as “kwakels” span drainage channels and canals, giving access to the land beyond.

On the other side of the canal lies the “over-garden”, elegant gardens often designed in the French style belonging to wealthy merchants wishing to protect the view from their house.

Clearly the “knippenbruggen” were built for able-bodied souls.

Less able folks like me would have to have had assistance, take their chances or taken the long way around via the flat bridges.

Annoyingly I only have one decent photograph of the “knippenbruggen” I was on, in hindsight I maybe should have tried to get a side on view to show just how steep it was. Mind you, to do that I would have had to get rather closer to the canal edge, it’s been raining, the ground was soft and slippery…   so on second thoughts  …maybe not. I think that the “blauwe reiger” (blue heron) fishing for his dinner close by probably agrees.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 27, 2014

Getting Out Of The Rain And Refortified…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

When our family of four and visiting Singaporean friend “Velevtine” exited the tour boat at Zaanse Schans we found that the  tour had taken longer than we first thought and, lacking lunch at our stomachs are now rumbling very loudly indeed.

Several of the Zaanse Schans buildings are working businesses and one of these is the café /  restaurant “De Hoop Op d’Swarte Walvis”.

The  heavy rain has mostly abated, but  we seem to have timed it well because whilst we are eating there are a few smaller passing squalls pass by, but by the time we left the  restaurant sunshine was more or less taking control again.

The building has character and many nice touches, for example old tiles in the foyer,  wooden alcoves and wood panelling, a relaxing looking outside patio area that’s too damp for use on the day we were there. (I also have a  photograph of the restaurant patio taken from the boat). One interesting thing I saw though made me took twice: there was a wooden box with a glass front mounted on the wall of the other part of the building  that was at the end of the patio area, it contains a magnum sized bottle of Moet… the bottle is imposing, that’s some celebration that it would be used for!

We settle for a milder  round of brews: tea’s and hot chocolates… and I order a ham and salad sandwich, the kids opt for fries and a croquet and Velvetine and Himself go for various pasta dishes. The verdict is that the food is good but both Velvetine and Himself mentioned that their portions were rather smaller then they would have liked.  We indulge in some Dutch apple taart  (apple pie) for dessert.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Now we are fortified and ready to get out and about exploring again…

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