Local Heart, Global Soul

December 20, 2012

Dear President Obama…

Mikey, a fellow Blogger at “ Invisible Mikey” made a reblog of a petition for Gun Control reforms in the USA in response to the terrible tragedy at the Sandy Hook Elementary (Primary) School. http://invisiblemikey.wordpress.com/2012/12/16/2807/

At first as a Dutch/ New Zealand citizen I thought that I wouldn’t be able to sign it because I am not American and don’t live in the USA, but I found that indeed I could, so I did and I also wrote a short comment in the little comment box that was provided.

Now, after posting a different thread yesterday and seeing responses I find myself thinking again about this topic on many levels and wanted to write a post on the letter I would write if I were to present my views in a letter to the American President, Barack Obama. I suppose his office gets the equivalent of a small forest of trees in post every day, so my little letter from a land far away would be ineffectual, so I’ll just pour out my feelings here. (Note to my earlier readers, yes I added more text…)

Tying multiple thoughts together , my letter would read something like:

Dear President Barack Obama,
Like millions of people around the world I was deeply shocked and distressed to hear of the mass shooting of innocents at Sandy Hook Elementary (Primary) School in Newtown, Connecticut, USA.

The scenario that unfolded there is every parents worst nightmare: innocent,  defenceless children and their teachers, assassinated in cold blood in a place where they should have felt and been safe: their school.

I simply can’t imagine the pain of the news that was delivered to some parents in Newtown that day: to be told that their precious child won’t ever be coming home again. Every person on the planet who cherishes the life of child as they should,  feels revolted by the actions of this madman.

From what I see as an outsider, it appears this could well have been prevented if this perpetrator’s ability to access weapons had been severely restricted, just as similar atrocities against the general public at other schools, theatres etc in America may also have been prevented.

There is far too much emphasis from the gun lobby about an individuals “rights” and not nearly enough on “ responsibility and accountability”.  I believe that sometimes the individual should sometimes give up a little of his “rights” in pursuit of the wider safety benefits to the greater community and society as a whole.

Not only are a tsunami of sea changes long overdue in the gun lobby but I believe also in the media too. Some people are truly mentally ill or just plain evil  and will take an undue solace in the fact that even when dead they will enjoy notoriety in the fact that they will always be remembered as the person who “killed the most at..”etc.
President Obama: I implore you to change national laws so that no perpetrator can be named in any mode of media, no image of a perpetrator may be shown and no family details revealed.  We should refuse to write their names, to give even negative attention, even to their memory.

The only people who deserve “attention” in these circumstances are the victims of their actions and a blanket ban that grants absolutely zero notoriety to the perpetrator must surely help to stop others with morbid illusions of grandeur.

Yes, usually the perpetrator has/had issues of revenge or mental illness etc, but that can be kept private because  it is surely self evident that anyone who is cable of such heinous attacks on innocents has serious issues of some sort.

I sincerely believe that the general public of your country are intelligent enough to have figured that out already. Therefore details are not necessary, except privately and in strictest confidence to the families directly affected.

I live in The Netherlands and my country is a safer place for having strict gun control, as  a parent of young children I wish for your children and parents to feel as safe in their communities as I do.

Please  use lessons learned from this terrible tragedy to save innocent lives in the future.

Should you choose not to, then no one will have had justice, and someone else  will loose their lives in another preventable situation.

Mr. Obama, you and USA lawmakers are in a position to prevent bloodshed and save lives, Please do not miss this rare opportunity and please make the responsible choice with greatest priority.

The World joins you in an outpouring of humanity and sharing of your national pain, sheds it’s tears and wishes you strength today but I believe it will judge you severely if you do not take this opportunity to make deep reforms in gun control and media reporting.

President Obama, I understand that the United States Gun Lobby is powerful, what I do not understand is why? 

Elsewhere in the world it is both possible to be a firearms enthusiast and a responsible citizen… you play your sport and then you leave your weapons in a secure vault at the Club.

A few private citizens might need a gun: for instance to shoot an dying animal on a farm but licences to obtain these weapons should only be given after exceptionally strict controls are carried out and regular stringent spot checks on access are made. Guns are ultimately a murder weapon and are a grave Responsibility not a Right.

What has gone so wrong with society that some people feel the necessity to stockpile arms and ammunitions for “protection” ?

What message does that end to the World about your education system, or faith and trust in one another? Massive issues about this need to be addressed at all levels, from individual level to national. Personally, I see this point in your history as an opportunity to address those issues.

For me at least the definition of “population” means private citizens who live together, not band of small private armies. I believe your constitution reads: We the People, and not “we the arms dealers…” does it not?

Your Senate and Congress are required to represent “the people”… so as far as I can ascertain we have:

– children who have pocket money
– are the voiceless citizens unable to make their own decisions in the eyes of the law
– are smallest, weakest and most silent and have no hope of getting what they want on their own.
v’s

– Gun lobby who have deep pockets
– hold all influence in your Senate and Congress
– are the biggest , strongest and loudest and hold most power in getting what they want.

Which of these two groups do you think should be given priority when upholding and defending their “Rights”?

.. or is it most literally and figuratively only the Gun Lobby who are allowed to “call the shots” in America?

There is an opportunity here for a Legacy that could change life in America for ordinary decent citizens for the better.

Yes, I am well aware that America has a long “history” and a “love affair” with it’s guns, but “history” is the past and surely after steady repetition of  truly terrible events like this the “love affair”  has proved to be an abusive relationship that such a relationship in the 21st Century should surly be well and truly over.

(Smoking was also once thought by the world to “do no harm” but we got wiser, learned and changed our position on smoking’s effects in order to save lives. Fixing Past errors in thinking commands respect, ignoring them: contempt.)

Sometimes there is a pivotal moment in a nation’s history where we are shaken to the core by events and need to take stock of ourselves as a culture and re-evaluate what society really needs and wants.  I believe that for the United States this pivotal moment is Now. Now it is time to look at the future and to take radical steps to make America a safer place for future generations.

How many innocent children need to be assassinated before someone  with the will and the authority does something to stop it?  How sick to your stomach do you have to feel before you get angry enough to stand up for them? I read once that a former President  of the United States said “the buck stops here”      

… This letter Mr. President,  is your buck.

December 15, 2012

When the Nightmare Becomes Reality…

Filed under: Connecticut,LIFE,UNITED STATES OF AMERICA — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , , , ,
(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Dear Readers,

I had a completely different post lined up for today all ready in the schedule and ready to post,  and slept most of the day as I’m home  from work sick.

There was no TV, no radio on all day:  Himself is also sick as a dog so when the kids came home, tired. cold and wet, and Kiwi Daughter in a foul mood it took both of us all of our energy to control the war she was trying to start and subdue the tantrums and  tears.

(It’s near the end of  term and starting High School has been a big shock to her system that sucks the energy out of the kid, she’s worked hard but the Christmas holiday can’t come fast enough for her as the strain of learning to be a “big kid”  shows.)

So, it’s 9.00 p.m. both tired kids are in bed and Himself,  looking like a zombie crashed out too within minutes. I realise I haven’t checked my email all day so want to stay up to check it… in my Favourites List is the BBC News website which I absently click on first.

The headline I am met with is essentially every parent’s nightmare: a mass shooting  at the Sandy Hook Primary School in Newtown, Connecticut, USA.   I shiver, and read with tears in my eyes.

A madman (he doesn’t deserve attention so I refuse to write his name) has gunned down children and their teachers, some 27 people, in what appears to have been a small town, close-knit community.  I simply can’t imagine the news that will be delivered to some parents in Newtown today, I wouldn’t wish this news on anyone, to be told that their child won’t be coming home.

It’s clear that teachers did everything they could, hiding children in cupboards keeping them silent as the perpetrator stalked the halls.

Some of the teachers didn’t stand a chance, their loved ones will also face the most devastating of news today too.

There will probably be a long and heated debate about the (in)famous gun laws in the United States…  but that’s for later. Right now I can only sit numbly at the shock of this news, and wonder how on earth those parents will cope now that this nightmare has become their reality.

Tonight I am reminded that our pitiful hassles are few, life gets put into perspective again and my kids get an extra kiss planted onto their sleeping faces, and even though I’ve already said it today, I want to take them in my arms and remind them again how much  love them, though I doubt they would appreciate being roused from their innocent dreams.

As the shock of this event ripples around the world, I can only hope that these parents could know that good and decent parents everywhere are thinking of them, praying for them and wishing them strength. Our tears flow and like you we can not comprehend the awfulness of this madness.

Rest in Peace little children… and the innocent adults who perished too.  You were taken too soon and the world mourns.

January 27, 2012

Trapizza and the History that Brings Me Back Here…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Pizza and I have never been best of friends. I remember only too well my mother’s home-made efforts.. the toppings were ok enough but the pizza bottoms were thick and doughy.

Everyone else in the family seemed to love it like that and I was the only one sitting glumly at the table trying to think of ways to get out of the labourous task of wading though a pizza base twice as thick as  the thumbs that held the pieces.

From then on I avoided pizza whenever possible, and considered myself a confirmed non-pizza eater. If there had been a club with a life membership to not eat pizza I would have signed up.

Then, whilst touring “small town America” with Himself before the kids were born, we arrived late in a small place called Belle in Missouri and the one and only place open so late in the evening was a small pizza place.

I frowned and wasn’t extatic about the idea but it was the only place open for miles and we were really hungry so I steeled myself for the first pizza experience of my adult life and took a table with no enthusiasm whatsoever.

Himself made the order at the desk and I contemplated just eating garlic bread and nothing else. To my disappointment garlic bread wasn’t on their menu, or they were sold out of it, so pizza it was going to have to be.

Our pizza’s were duely delivered to us and my eyes opened in wonder… a thin crust, a wonderfully thin crust and topping to die for… bad pizza memories were being extinguished with every mouthful.

The lady who ran the pizzeria was called Arlene W. and she collected Coca Cola memerobilia. Himself had some coasters back home in the Netherlands that he’d found in a box load of stuff he’s been given from someone and he asked for Arlene’s address so that he could send them to her.

We duely sent them once we were home and she replied to say Thank You and thus began a tradition where we wrote once a year exchanging Christmas Cards. Arline’s handwriting was always a challenge to read and over the years it got less steady and even harder to read but we kept up with news and looked forward to the card that bore the USA stamp and Missouri postcode each Christmas.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

We learned over the years that her smiling husband had passed away, that she left the pizzeria business and her health was deteriating. Two years ago, after some 15 Christmase’s we received no reply to the card and letter we sent out, and we are now left wondering if she is just no longer capable of writing or of she too has passed away.

Either way we have very fond memories of Arlene and wish her rest and peace. I’ve tried pizza here in NL since that trip but not one of them have come even close to exciting my tastebuds as Arlene’s did so my pizza experiences remain few and far between.

Since Arlene W.  is the one who made me brave enough to order a pizza here at Siloso beach, I owe her too for the discovery of my second favoutite pizza place (considering how rarely I eat pizza, looking forward to one somewhere is saying something).

Here at Trapizza Restaurant on Sentosa’s Siloso beach I have again found a pizza that turned all my misconceptions about pizza on their head. Wafer thin crusts cooked in a piping hot pizza oven has left me with a new appreciation of how brilliant pizza can be, even enough to turn the head of a seemingly confirmed pizza hater.

Our trips to Singapore would no longer be complete without a meal here at Trapizza.

I’ve made blog posts on this place before and no doubt will again in the future… and why not, when this place cooks a pizza that I adore and nowhere at home in the Netherlands even comes close? .. but love as I do their Pizza’s, all kudos goes to Arlene in Belle Missouri for changing my relationship with Pizza forever.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I even get to try and take photos whilst being wheeled home by Himself. What more does a girl need? (answer: lessons in how to take night photos if you saw all the out of focus ones I deleted)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

January 2, 2010

Road to the airport and sorry to leave…

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY,UNITED STATES OF AMERICA — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: ,

It’s our last day in Boston and we are sad to leave… we have had a wonderful time staying with our friends and visiting some beautiful, amazing places.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

..some cool looking lamps…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

..local tour  taking place…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Children’s Museum  with a mega giant bottle outside !

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

.. off to the airport!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

We have had a fabulous  time and we are most sad to be going home… leaving our friends great company is hard, but jobs to home  call and our wonderful summer holiday is at an end.

January 1, 2010

A look around Boston…

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY,UNITED STATES OF AMERICA — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: ,

I’m loving Boston.. sadly we have too short a time and our wish-list of things to see is too long…

Here is a Photo Tour of a little bit of Boston. ( Really it’s just a snippet)… enjoy!

On the Common…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

A strange shaped building used to ajoin this one???

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Boxes with newspapers for sale…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

gorgeous building…  artistry in stone…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

.. nice to see plants on the lamps…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

trying to convey how the bottom of this stone ornament  is like a boat…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

school bus… ( nothing like this back home in Europe…)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

..mail boxes also completely different to ours at home…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

December 31, 2009

The most amazing Dorothea L. Dix…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

We are walking around the centre of Boston and come across a beautiful fountain. The inscription reads “Dorothea L. Dix Foundation”

I don’t actually know who this person was, but another inscription on the other side of the fountain makes me want to find out more.

So… here is a not so small summary about this amazing woman…

Dorothea Lynde Dix was a teacher who went on to become a pivotal force in the the reform of treatment  of  the mentally ill.  At the age of thirty-nine, she started a fundamental change in American mental institutions and by fifty-four had covered half the USA and was inspecting institutions for abuse of the patients.

In this fifteen year period she achieved  an astounding amount and the effects of her work not only gained an immediate response but also live on today in the manner  that people who suffer mental illess are treated.

Dorothea was born on April 4, 1802 in  Hampden, Maine. The eldest of three children of Joseph Dix and Mary Bigelow Dix. Her father was an itinerant Methodist preacher.  Her family life can be described as abusive and nonexistent. Her mother was not in good mental health and her father was an abusive alcoholic.

Even though her formative years were not the happiest, she learned many things from her father that would influence her life. He taught her how to read and write, putting her adead of the class then she entered school, this in turn developed her passion for reading and teaching and she subsequently taught both her brothers to read.

At this time  the family moved to Vermont and her mother was suffering from acute, incurable headaches and her father was drinking heavily and they were deemed that they  longer capable of caring for their children. Madame Dix, Dorothea’s grandmother, took the children to live at the Dix Mansion in Boston.  Dorothea was twelve and already  accustomed to caring for her brothers, a situation that continued as she lived with her seventy-year old grandmother.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Her grandmother was wealthy and demanded that Dorothea act and have interests of a wealthy girl. Her grandmother hired a dance instructor and a seamstress to cater to Dorothea’s personal needs. However, Dorothea wished for none of these trappings.

Her grandmother punished her severely when she was trying to give food and her new clothes to the beggar children who were standing at their front gate. At the age of fourteen, Madame Dix requested that her sister,Mrs. Duncan, who lived in Worcester, take care of Dorothea for a “while” and turn her into a “lady.”, Once she arrived at her great aunt’s house Dorothea immediately took on the role of “young lady” so she could return to her brother’s. However, she was to stay with her Aunt for nearly four years.

During this time Dorothea attended several parties for her rich relatives and met her second cousin, Edward Bangs. Edward, fourteen years her senior and was a well-known attorney. He took an immediate interest in Dorothea. Dorothea told him her plans to be a schoolteacher. He suggested she start  “a little dame school”. Girls at this time were not permitted to attend public schools. but could be taught by other women privately.

Edward located a store on Main Street in which Dorothea could hold her classes. In the fall of 1816, at age fifteen, she faced her first twenty pupils between the ages of six and eight. She ran this school of sorts for three years. All this time Edward would continually visited and kept  her company.  Edward, now thirty-one, told Dorothea now 18,  that he had fallen in love with her. Frightened and scared she immediately closed down her school and returned to the Dix’s Mansion in Boston. However, Edward was not detered. He followed Dorothea to Boston and purposed marriage. Dorothea accepted but would not agree to a definite date.

The obvious reasoning for resisting marriage  was that Dorothea feared that she would become like her parents. Marriage to her meant desertion of children, emotional outbreaks, fights and heavy drinking.

Once  back in Boston she began reading her grandfather’s Harvard University books.  She wanted to ask her grandmother to use the Dix Mansion as a new school but feared her reaction. However, one day she got the courage to write her grandmother a letter, even though they lived under the same roof, of her intentions. She told her that she wanted to open a school for poor girls to get an education. In addition she would open a separate classroom for wealthy girls, as they deserved an education as well. Madame Dix was thrilled with her granddaughter’s plans and heartedly agreed to them, much to Dorothea’s surprise.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

However in the spring of 1821 Dorothea’s father died in New Hampshire. At this time in her life she knew deep down that she was not destined to marry Edward and returned his engagement ring.

From 1822-1836 Dorothea managed to teach her two classes and began writing several books for children. However in 1830, she became very weak and ill. andwas asked by her good friend Dr. Channing, if she would accompany his family to St. Croix and be a tutor for his daughters. During this time she was able to fully recuperate and return to her school in Boston.

On her return in the fall of 1831, aged twenty-nine, she received news that her good friend, General Levi Lincoln, was elected the new government of Massachusetts and his secretary of state happened to be her former fiance, Edward Bangs. These two individuals would later become influential in getting Dorothea’s laws concerning mental health accepted as government policy.

In 1836 Dorothea took care of her sick grandmother and continued teaching at her school. However she became more and more drained and eventually leading to a breakdown and severe hemorrhages. Her condition is now known as “tuberculosis”, but at this time there was no name for it or cure. Upon her doctor’s urging she gave up her school and took a long vacation set up by Dr. Channing to England. While she was recuperating her grandmother and mother died within a two days of each other. She stayed in England until January of 1841 when she returned to Boston in better health.

Dorothea’s second career began when she was thirty-nine years old. In March 1841 she entered the East Cambridge Jail having volunteered to teach a Sunday School class for women inmates. There she witnessed such horrible images that her life, from that point on, was changed forever. Within the confines of this jail she observed prostitutes, drunks, criminals, retarded individuals, and the mentally ill were all housed together in unheated, unfurnished, and foul-smelling quarters.  When asked why the jail was in these conditions the answer was, “the insane do not feel heat or cold”

Immediately took the matter to the courts and  finally won. Dorothea then proceeded to visit jails and almshouses, where the mentally ill were housed in other parts of Boston and soon her investigations extended over the entire state of Massachusetts.

She made careful and extensive notes as she visited with jailers, caretakers and townspeople. She shaped a carefully worded document to be delivered to the Massachusetts legislature.  In addition her timid presentation of her findings completely won over the legislative board because her conviction was so powerful.

Dorothea’s views about the treatment of the mentally ill were radical at the time. The popular belief was that the insane would never be cured and living within their dreadful conditions was enough for them. However Dorothea, just by bettering the conditions of the inmates, showed people that mental illness wasn’t all incurable. She stated that “some may say these things cannot be remedied, these furious maniacs are not to be raised from these base conditions.  Although Dorothea didn’t know the mental processes that were occurring within these individuals she knew that improving their conditions wouldn’t hurt them .

She traveled to other states and proceeded doing the same process: extensive travel to jails and almshouses in a state, careful descriptions of conditions in jails and almshouses, and preparation of a document comparable to the one which proved successful in Massachusetts .  Although her health was very poor, she managed to cover every state on the east side of the Mississippi. She played a major role in founding 32 mental hospitals, 15 schools for the feeble minded, a school for the blind, and numerous training facilities for nurses.

Her efforts were an indirect inspiration for the building of many additional institutions for the mentally ill. She was also instrumental in establishing libraries in prisons, mental hospitals and other institutions.

In 1848, she sent a document to the United States Congress asking that five million acres be set aside and to be used for the care of the mentally ill. . In 1854 the bill passed and was approved by both houses but was vetoed by President Franklin Pierce. After her fighting Dorothea was physically worn out by trying to fulfill her dream. She decided to travel to Europe to rest.

Once she got to Europe she had no time to rest for she began her process of inspecting jails and almshouses there as well. She traveled to England, Scotland, France, Austria, Italy, Greece, Turkey, Russia, Sweden, Denmark, Holland, Belgium and Germany. In  of only two years: 1854 to 1856 she made an effective change in the way Europeans dealt with the mentally ill as she had in the United States.

Upon her return to the United States in 1854 she continued to travel and investigate many states she had not managed to visit before. However at the outbreak of the Civil War she put her energies into being the Superintendent of Union Army Nurses. Although she wasn’t effective in this field, she continued to serve throughout the war. In 1881 the state hospital in Trenton, New Jersey opened. This was the first hospital  initiated and built through her efforts.

Since her own health was failing she admitted herself into this hospital. She remained in the hospital for a period of six years. Her death on July 17, 1887 ended a career that was unique in its singleness of purpose and magnitude of accomplishment.

Dorothea Dix has been described as “the most effective advocate of humanitarian reform in American mental institutions during the nineteenth century” (Goldenson, 1970). However, her achievements are only mentioned in five of the current fifty-three textbooks covering the history of psychology. The reason given for this is that she did not contribute to our understanding of the nature of mental disorders. In her life, she was inconspicuous with her work, and she did not place her name on most of her publications. She refused to have hospitals named after her.

Expressions of praise and gratitude for her work always produced embarrassment. In later years of her retirement she refused to talk about her achievements and wanted them to “rest in silence”.

( I have amened a lot of this text from Wikipedia)…. what brilliant reading and that an amazing life !

It just goes to prove that one single person on a mission with a passion to make things better really can !!! Bravo Dorothea, maybe you did not wish for accolades but you certainly deserve them. I can only hope that somewhere, somehow in my life I could do something that reaches out even in tiny measure to what you have done.

December 30, 2009

Boston’s Quincy Market… up, down, and surrounds…

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY,UNITED STATES OF AMERICA — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , , ,

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

Yep, I’m still in Quincy Market… (any Foodie worth their salt could spend waaaay too much time here quite easily mind you) The littlest kids are tired because it’s hot and they are sick of walking, so they are happy to take a seat and munch on their lunch for a little while.

We have ajourned to the “gallery” part of the  Market, it’s upstairs in the centre of the building and whilst there is a seating area downstairs too, we found that to be very busy and so it was a nice discovery that just up the stairs where were tables fee, less noise and bustle and a chance to watch the world go by, below.

The building itself is steeped in history too… in the early 1800’s, Bostonians needed more land for a new and larger market, so they filled in the harbour, pushing back the waterfront to where it is today.

I have no idea if the signs on the walls reflect former tenants of this building in days gone by,or not….  but certainly they add to the atmosphere and the dome provides light and a good sense of space.

Let’s take a look around…

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

..and the centre of the building  is topped by a large dome…

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

The marketplace expanded to include the New Quincy Market building and became the hub of New England commerce in 1826 in response to Boston’s rapid growth. The building itself is steeped in history too… in the early 1800’s, Bostonians needed more land for a new and larger market, so they filled in the harbour, pushing back the waterfront to where it is today.

The marketplace expanded to include the New Quincy Market building and became the hub of New England commerce in 1826 in response to Boston’s rapid growth.

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

The Quincy Market is arranged in several levels, inside you have the main food hall, directly outside there is a kind of porch arrangement, with also some entrances to a basement level for some shops under the Market building,  the Porch style area is a covered area where there are barrows selling souvenirs and outside the covered porch there are more traders dotted around in the pedestrian area, in kiosks, more barrows etc

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

The Quincy Market is arranged in several levels, inside you have the main food hall, directly outside there is a kind of porch arrangement, with also some entrances to a basement level for some shops under the Market building…

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

….the Porch style area is a covered area where there are barrows selling souvenirs and outside the covered porch there are more traders dotted around in the pedestrian area, in kiosks, more barrows etc.

Mr. –“I-loooove-wheels”-Four was rather taken by this barrow…. ( funny that!)

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

Then we are drawn to a  stall with toys and are all captivated for a while by this little plane that speeds around the track.  Nooo kids, we don’t have room in the bags for it.

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

Bye Bye for now Quincy Market…  but rest assured, I will be back !

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

December 29, 2009

A Foodie’s delight… Quincy Market in Boston.

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY,UNITED STATES OF AMERICA — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , , ,

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

Boston Massachusetts have a particular location that is well know to foodie fanatics.

Just mention the name “ Quincy Market” and their mouths will start to water.

Quincy Market is a food Hall that will surely have something to please everyone, The biggest problem is how to choose between all the amazing treats on offer.

There are many local specialities on offer, from the most obvious : lobster, but many many other local and regional treats too.

There is a long arcade of food stalls and shops inside the Market, a gallery mezzanine floor above where seating and tables are provided for you to enjoy your food and where you can “people-watch” the bustle below…

… it’s simply a matter of browsing around, deciding  which style of cuisine ( or mix and match as takes your fancy) making a selection and then sitting down to a wonderful food experience. The bustle and atmosphere also adds to the ” flavour” and when you see other people in your group ( or the table next to yours) returning  with more mouthwatering goodies you will be wishing that you have more time and a bigger stomach.

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

Quincy Market is definitely a place were many many things would be on my wish-list, if they didn’t actually get onto my personal plate. Time to take you on a little tour…

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

Yikes… where to start choosing … it ALL looks so yummy!

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

Too much to chose from!

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

December 28, 2009

Old and New Boston… Faneuil Hall.

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY,UNITED STATES OF AMERICA — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photo © kiwidutch)

We are visiting Boston, Massachusetts, and looking around the center of the city.

Faneuil Hall is an impressive building that was constructed in 1742 by Peter Faneuil as a meeting place and as Boston’s central market place for crops and livestock.

It’s provided a forum for public debate in Boston and during the Revolutionary era it was the seat of local government.

On the second floor, members discussed issues of the day.

The ground floor below has housed a market place for over 250 years.

Charles Bulfinch, the well known Boston architect, expanded Faneuil Hall in 1805-06 and his most dramatic contribution was the Great Hall, designed to accommodate public meetings, ceremonies and special events.

The Hall continues to be actively used today.

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

There are also maps depicting “Old” and “ New”Boston….

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

I love architectural detail and find plenty of it here to delight the eye…

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

December 27, 2009

Boston Common, a walking tour and the Freedom Trail…

(photo © kiwidutch)

We are in Boston Massachusetts visiting a few sights while we wait for our friends van to be repaired and before we have to fly back to the Netherlands.

There is amazing amount of history in the region, too much for us to see in the short space of time that we have in Boston…

…So we have already decided that one day we will be returning here to learn more about this amazing city.

There are bus tours available but we are enjoying our walking tour…

We find a statue to commemorate the Declaration of Independence, with a copy of the signatures of the signatories.

Of course I know about the Declaration of Independence, but in a very general vague very basic-general-knowledge kind of  way,  but not in any detail. Here, the history is bought home to me and I realise just how little I really know on the subject. I’m keen to learn more.

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

Even though we are in the center of a very large city it’s a pleasant walk and we are having a good time learning a little about the history of Boston.

We are on Boston Common, and some statues catch my eye as we walk around and I walk over for a closer look. Parkman Plaza is named for George E, Parkman 1823-1908, who was the benefactor who enabled improvements to be made on Lafayette Mall and this plaza to be created.

One of the statues here depicts “Religion” another, “Industry” and another, “Learning”.

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

There is a walk around various points of interest around central Boston, called the “Freedom Trail” and it is marked in the pavement by a red stripe or red bricks and punctuated by markers set in the ground.

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

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