Local Heart, Global Soul

January 23, 2014

It Appears That It’s Not Just Family Kiwidutch That Prefers To Remain Anonymous…

Filed under: Aldenhoven,FOOD,German Cuisine,GERMANY,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , , ,
(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Another post about our summer of 2012 adventures through small snippets of England, Belgium, France, Luxembourg and Germany with visiting friend “Velvetine” from Singapore.

We are about to leave the small German town of Aldenhoven, and start the day with a typical German breakfast of  a selection of breads, cheeses and cold meats.

The breakfast room downstairs is also the back end of the bar, and  considering that fact that the place looks like it caters almost exclusively to  local clientèle, the tables are probably what were used in the restaurant when it was functioning too.  I later found that I only had two photographs of the table we breakfasted at, and both featured Himself and the kids, so I edited them out for the purposes of our family privacy and my policy of not putting identifying photographs on the internet.

I also have one more interesting “find” to show you: a lovely tower that is almost opposite the “man in the doorway” statue that I featured in yesterdays post. I didn’t find any information boards for it, not even a solitary name board, but clearly it’s an important  building because it ‘s featured on a plaque close by (which also had no name or other identifying information), and then again on another board about the town along with the little chapel and large church  we saw earlier and some other buildings we missed seeing.

I find my wish for anonymity a logical one,  after all in real life you wouldn’t be shouting out your personal details and those of  your children to complete strangers, so why do it on the web? But for a town that clearly gets very few tourists, to not promote it’s finest buildings for the few that come, to not even identify these lovely historic beauties with a simple name tag?  What a desperate shame, what a missed opportunity.

I see a lovely tower like this, clearly a loved local historic building and the historian in me would love to know what it was… who it was built by and when?, what it started life as and what it’s used for now?…  but instead we leave with a sigh, guessing and wondering.  For now at least, even with the best will and a little blog exposure on the internet, this little tower remains as anonymous as Family Kiwidutch.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 22, 2014

A Doorway Into Your Imagination, Or A Window Into The World?…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Another retrospective post from my travel diary of the summer of 2012.

Family Kiwidutch and visiting Singaporean friend “Velvetine” are in the small German town of Aldenhoven, and having eaten rather too much dinner, have opted for a short walk around the area of our hotel.

Jut down the street, we find a statue of a man standing behind a door.

It’s a stable door in two parts, the lower part is closed, the upper part of the door is not represented.

The man leans through the open upper frame, looking out into the distance with his straight arms clasped.

Two pairs of wooden clogs (one set smaller than the other suggesting  that they are “His” and Her’s”, or possibly a parent and child pairs) are propped against the outside of the door, they also suggest farm work  or fishing wharf  work since in many areas of Europe wooden clogs were historically used in wet areas or muddy fields as they keep the wearers feet drier and warmer than other available materials in the days before the invention of rubber boots. It’s an interesting statue…Let’s take a look…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Blog at WordPress.com.