Local Heart, Global Soul

March 23, 2019

Maranatha, A Floating Roof And Awesome Brickwork…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Sometimes whilst I was on full Medical Leave (before I went back to work) Himself would just drop me off  somewhere interesting in the city in my wheelchair, leave me to take photographs of various things in a small radius for a while.

After an hour he would come and pick me up again.

This got me out of the house for a small amount of time, away from the walls of home where I was confined due to surgery, recovery, constant pain and heavy medication.

Of course there was a price to pay afterwards for my little outings and fresh air, even with an attachment on the wheelchair where my leg could be positioned straight and raised out in front of me.

Extra medication is always needed afterwards, which morphine based, works as needed but is not ideal for your body. Sometimes it’s needed for your mental health. On this occasion I did a series of photographs in the little street where the former Tekel Air Travel Bureau was. (see blog post here:  “Pigs Might Not Fly But Apparently Dogs Did… “).

I was surprised and delighted to see a small information board on the street by the entrance, telling me about some of the history of the Church.  As is often the case when an information board is in multiple languages, the information given in the “extra” languages is often shorted to fit the space, whilst the text in the native country language contains extra snippets.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Such is the case here.  Both before and after the English language text are extra pieces of information from the Dutch text.

Translated from Dutch it reads: The Maranatha church is located on part of the former  “Sperrgebiet” (Prohibited / restricted Area) of the Second World War.

The houses that stood there were, after the liberation were found to have been stripped of all wood and other useful materials, so were ripe for demolition.”

Next comes the information written in both Dutch and English:

The wooden roof structure of this church was designed by Swiss engineer Emil Staudacher as a prototype for use in temporary churches to be built in the devastated German cities. 

It arrived in kit form on a train from Zurich and was integrated into a design by Dutch architect  Frits Eschauzier (1889-1957). The temporary churches project was initiated by German architect Otto Bartning. Over forty of the churches still exist in places across Germany.”

Lastly comes the additional translate from Dutch snippet: “They have the same rose window and the same small window in the façade. Due to the continuing row of windows on the side, it looks like the roof is floating.

Bartning positioned the entrance on the side. The ceremonial front door was added at the request of the Hague church councilors.”

I was first drawn to the church because of the quirky brick construction. These fortified walls with buttresses reinforce the outside walls. interestingly these brick “out layers” are uniquely joined to the main building, seemingly by a method as simple as splicing the brickwork of the two together. It gives for a very unconventional bricklaying technique I think, barely a straight line to be seen in some sections. I find this to be some pretty awesome brickwork!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(Below) This is the row of windows along the side wall, I’m not so convinced about the floating window idea…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(Below) Now HERE is some mega awesome brickwork!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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