Local Heart, Global Soul

May 29, 2018

Finding The Beehive…

Filed under: NEW ZEALAND,PHOTOGRAPHY,WELLINGTON — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

One of the buildings in Wellington New Zealand is not only iconic and famous, but also etched into my childhood memories.

That building is of course the “Beehive”, the name of New Zealand’s Parliament building.

It stands next to the old parliament building, of typical English colonial style, square, grey, columns, graceful and formal.

The Beehive in contrast looks exactly like it’s name, taking the form of a medieval beehive, an upturned basket, small, compact, and … round!

Interestingly New Zealand’s national co-ordination centre for Civil Defence is (or at least still is, as far as I know) in the depths of the building, ready to co-ordinate all sorts of agencies, rallying in times of a national or large disaster.

When there are “events” such as the large Christchurch earthquakes, all of the emergency services become quickly overwhelmed.

Help is therefore recruited from local organizations, businesses, clubs and volunteers who have practiced for these situations.

For example: four wheel drive club members turned up to help get Doctors and Nurses to hospitals over broken roads impassable to anything except off-road style vehicles. Businesses go through practiced drills to account for staff members and get them into safe areas.First Aiders will gather at places like schools to help assist with the many minor injuries and triage those who need urgent transportation to hospital. The irony is that the Beehive sits on top of a huge fault line, how they would manage co-ordination should the “big one” hit Wellington, I don’t know, but I assume that they have a range of measures in place. My sister, Mother and I did a holiday tour here in our early teens; I still remember our time in the old parliament building, and eating lunch in the sunshine on the steps outside afterwards. The building is not high compared with its downtown neighbours, and there are so many new high rises that we found the Beehive harder to locate than we thought. It peeks out with us on the wrong side of one-way streets, until finally it pops into view.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

December 27, 2013

The Second Market Is Quite Literally Buzzing…

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

We are about to leave Vianden Castle in Vianden, Luxembourg.

Downstairs in one of the lower galleries (or Great Halls, or whatever they all it) is another market, this time of hand-made jewellery, medieval costumes, wood and leather work, local and regional produce.

Some of the vendors were packing up and I was fast reaching maximum pain tolerance after all this walking around the castle this afternoon, so I’ll be honest and admit that I only photographed some of the stalls closest to us.

One of these was a source of fascination to all of us because a lady selling honey and honey related products also had a section of a hive in a box with a clear perspex side wall and there were live bees inside it.

I’m severly allergic to both bees and wasps and so usually the only bee-line I ever make is in the opposite direction of the little beasts, so this provided an excellent opportunity for me to actually see some hive activity up close.

Behind the clear screen the little worker bees were in constant busy motion, and whilst in the low light their movement was hard to photograph, it was amazing to see how intricate and organised the work seemed to be.

After a good chat with the honey lady, we were then attracted to a stall that sold medieval costumes. As I mentioned in an earlier post we bought a simple knight’s tunic for Little Mr. which he was so delighted with that he immediately put it on and in his imagination was instantly transformed into a full blown knight.

He would have slept in it that night too but I was the mean Mama who said “No… let’s save it to wear again tomorrow instead” which once he got over his indignation of not being able to sleep in it, ended up being the next best thing.

He wore it for days afterwards, and at home, and eventually for a special event at school too.

Velvetine fell in love with a medieval gown, it had huge quirky medieval sleeves, but the reality of finding somewhere suitable to wear such a heavy garment in tropical Singapore plus the space such a big dress would take in her suitcase meant that we took photographs, dreamed about it but reluctantly left it behind. Soon we had to leave the castle behind too… so we slowly make our way back into to town of Vianden.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

January 22, 2013

A Short Walk From the Prison Gate to the Bee Hive…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

This is the last post of photographs  from the chip I discovered  in an old camera that Little Mr. trashed as a toddler.

When I first arrived in The Hague there were no large high-rise buildings at all, but in recent years the skyline has changed beyond all recognition.

I know that if I stand a a few of these spots today in 2013, that the skyline has changed yet again. That is however a future walking tour, when walking is easier that it still is at present.

Some buildings remain almost timeless, like the famous rounded edges of De Bijenkorf  (which literately translates as “the beehive”) a large Dutch department store built in 1926.

There are a few narrow short-cut alleys that house little cafés and restaurants, there are the busy shopping streets, a tram goes by the De Gevangenpoort  (the prison gate)  which was a medieval prison  built in 1280, but which has been luckily a museum since 1882.

Many of these areas deserve detailed posts at a later date. Therefore today’s photo’s are a “study” of  city life as it was almost  five years ago… city’s change and evolve, I will be back to walk again, and document what has changed and what has remained.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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