Local Heart, Global Soul

March 5, 2019

A Penguin Faced, Googly-Eyed Gull ?…

The gull that came to pick up the seed (for wild birds) at our accommodation, really made me smile. I don’t know if it was that his eyes look a bit like those jangly stick-on googly eyes or that his/her black markings on the head look like Mother Nature accidently stuck a modified version of a penguin head on top of a gull body.  I must say he had some skill standing on one leg when he needed to scratch his nose, oops, I mean beak, I was most impressed. The patio outside our Bruinisse holiday home in Zeeland was a definite draw for the birds, and I had so much fun trying out the telephoto lens I had saved up for and finally bought. Not only are these my photographic testing grounds but also reference material for my drawing books.   I learned that beaks and feet are bigger than I thought, bird heads are smaller… but most of all I am impressed by how beautiful they are, how wonderfully the “mechanics” of these little flight machines works, and how feathers are so much more detailed than I thought.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

March 2, 2019

For The Artist And The Weather Watcher…

For both the Artist and the Weather Watcher, clouds are a tricky conglomeration of elements that can be quick to be admired but seriously difficult to master defining. Especially on canvas it is difficult to capture the moods of the skyscape in a way that looks realistic. On our way home from our 2017 Easter break in Zeeland, we spied enough different cloud formations to make use wonder what on earth Mother Nature was up to. I think that with everything people have been doing to the planet, she is very rightly confused. Here as we drove, the clouds were bright, white, grey or black, there were even patches of blue skies in-between. We didn’t know if we were running into bad weather or away from it, or if it was passing us in a horizontal fashion and we just had to pass through it. These images are for my arty Reference files, and saved… to the cloud.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 4, 2015

Pass Me A Wave Board And I’ll Lemur The Basics…

Filed under: Activities,Apenheul,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , , , ,
(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I’m just skipping back to part of our outdoor walk in Apenheul Zoo, a zoo specialising in all sorts of monkeys and primates.

Located  in the east of the Netherlands, we thought it would be a nice outing on a winters day over Easter 2013, hoping also to avoid the crowds because the park had only been open a few days for the season.

As it turned out the crowds were not at all a problem because most people had more sense than us and realised that it was going to be a bitterly cold day and stayed firmly indoors  in the warm.

We on the other hand, either endured frozen fingers (moi) or stuffed fists into pockets (the rest of the family) and made the best of things.

One animal that bought a huge smile to everyone’s faces was the Black and White Ruffed Lemur. We found one braving the outside cold but I suppose with his thick black and white woolly jacket of fur he was better insulated than we were.

Originally from Madagascar this monkey was delightfully both super shy and mega inquisitive at the same time.

He (or was that She?) was very skittish and sudden movements had him bounding away, but when Family Kiwidutch, and the visitors around us stood still, he was back to investigate these strange human beings and their kit.

His yellow eyes with an inner darker circle of yellow watched us intently. We all became silent or passed a few barely whispered words when he came right over to investigate the gloved outstretched hand of the lady next to me, and all of the visitors present had to stifle giggles when he checked out the wave-board that another child had put onto the ground close to us.

We whispered that maybe he was asking for lessons so that he could show his mates a few tricks?  Then some other visitors came around the corner talking and laughing loudly and the spell was broken.

The Lemur bounded off through the branches and settled in a tree some distance away, checking us out once more. Had the park been as busy as normal then probably we would have never been treated to such a close up experience with such a beautiful creature… and after he left us everyone in the little group he had just visited started exclaiming how wonderful an animal we had just seen. 

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

August 3, 2012

Black, Sparkling and VERY Hot!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

We have been following the road along the coast but one that’s a short distance inland so whilst we’ve managed to get many glimpses of the sea, we haven’t been too close to the edge of it yet.

It was hardly surprising therefore that when we rounded a corner near Patea and suddenly saw a beach just meters from the road that the kids were excitedly asking if we could stop in their best pleading “pleeeease, pleeeease, pleeeese” voices.

Once the van stopped they were quick to tumble out of the van and run down the bank onto the beach… where their shouts of joy turned to ones of astonishment as their bare soft Dutch city feet found the black sands far hotter than they could handle.

They solved this problem by immediately wading into the stream that was flowing into the sea and the shrieks continued as they discovered how cold the water was. Himself was left to hunt below the seats in the van for kid shoes and once these were found they were delighted to venture out of the water to investigate piles of driftwood and indeed the very sparkly sand all around them.

My photos didn’t really capture how black these sands were, and how it sparkled with the mineral content in it. This is proof that we are very very close to what was once a very active volcano as Mount Taranaki stands within erruption range (albeit millions of years ago). Mount Taranaki is/was also known as Mount Egmont, but like Mount Aorangi (Mount Cook) it’s been decided to revert back to their origonal Maori names.

Further down the beach in the wet sand a man on a motorbike is towing a plastic sled-like contraption in which a bigger kid is holding a littler kid and they are having brilliant time skidding along the sand as the tips of some of the waves connect with them periodically. As we watch the occupants of the sled change, clearly keeping the driver busy.

Our children decide to make a tiny collection of various “beaches” they have visited around the world so a kid-sized handful of sand goes into a small plastic bag and I will see if I can find a little shadow box at home to put it into. The embankment from the van to the the beach is too steep for me to negotiate on crutches so I content myself with photos taken from my vantage point at the van.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Blog at WordPress.com.