Local Heart, Global Soul

September 14, 2015

Taking A Look At The Maas In Maastricht…

Filed under: Limburg (Province),Maastricht,PHOTOGRAPHY,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , ,
(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Three years ago family Kiwidutch visited Maastricht and whilst looking around the historic city center we took time to stop at the river Maas, after which the city is named.

After taking photographs of Himself and the kids, I focused my attention on the scenery surrounding us. Some large boats on the water also got our attention and when we read the sign “Dagelijks Afvaarten” (Daily departures) we all agreed that it would be interesting to take this river boat trip if we could, sometime during our time here.

After several trips back to the city we remembered this idea but it was still early-ish in the morning and later on suited us better so Himself sorted out tickets for the afternoon.

The boat has two upper decks, visitors can choose to sit inside one the lower one or outside at the back of the same deck, and since it’s a lovely day I opt for the outside area and leave Himself and the kids to decide where they want to go. They head inside first of all but quickly realize that they aren’t going to get the best view there so come to join me after all. The tour starts out with the boat doing a “loop” under a nearby bridge, heading first left from the pier and then after we have gone under the bridge and back around we head off to the right where the rest of the tour takes place. For some reason there are a lot of people around, there is some sort of festival going on.  We will find out more about that later… for now we are checking out the views from the water.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

December 27, 2014

Bring Out Your Inner Pirate… And Prepare For A Soaking Me Hearties…!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

It might have been October of 2013 when we visited Legoland Germany, but we were fortunate because the weather was decently and even unseasonably warm.

One of the days in particular was over 25 degrees centigrade and sunny, another was 21 degrees but with bursts of intermittent rain.

It’s certain that some attractions would be packed full during the hot summer months and one fun way to cool off  would be with a good old fashioned water fight.

But remember: this is Legoland Germany, so this isn’t just any water fight.

We around yet another corner to discover a pirate themed area, first there is a large pirate playground, then there is the pirate boat ride that Himself and the kids enjoyed a ride on, and then to top it off, there is a large pirate boat ride, where not only can the passengers of the “galleons”  work together to wind cranks that pump water cannon onto  landlubbers around the attraction, but the landlubbers can go up on a raised platform and onto small jettys where they too can wind cranks and pump water into their water cannons to squirt back.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Obviously there are areas to go to if you are keen on joining in the watery fight, and there are dry areas to stand if you just want to watch and enjoy the show.

I avoided the slippery boards of the wet jettys and opted for the safety of the dry areas and set to work capturing some of the water fights.

Himself, Little Mr and Kiwi Daughter first took to the landlubber jetty’s and quirted water with great glee at the passing galleons,  all the while shrieking with delight as the retaliatory streams of water found their mark, in their faces, down their necks and saturating their clothes.

Then they boarded one of the big boats and the roles were reversed, and I got to observe that my husband took considerable enjoyment in manning the pumps with as much effort as possible, to the watery depriment of a father now on  one of the jettys with his two sons.

The water barrage got the better of the landlubbers and they were forced to retreat out of range, but the shouts of encouragement and squeals of excitement from both sides showed that much enjoyment was involved in the soaking. I’m sure that in the height of summer there would be long queues here, since even at this time of year, the whole attraction bought out the inner pirate in young and old.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

July 20, 2014

Phone Up The Skipper And Ask Him To Come Over…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Following yesterday’s post that details our October 2012 visit to Greece and our day-trip exploring the very tip of the Pelion Peninsular, we have come to the end of the road.

Rather literally the road ends at the waters edge and if we had stumbled upon this place without any local knowledge then chances are that Little Mr. would have played on the beach and paddled in the sea for a little while and then we would have turned the car around and driven  on.

(We’ve left Kiwi Daughter with our in-laws, playing with older cousin her age) Luckily we had been instructed on what to do when we got here by our  in-laws who have learned Greek due to their many years of holidaying here.

There’s a little concrete pier here but no scheduled ferry service. Instead there’s a sign with a telephone number and the idea is that if you want to get to the island then you  just ring the number and the ferryman will pop over and get you. We duly ring the number on the sign and luckily the  man who answers speaks English, is friendly and assures us he will be there shortly. Some ten  minutes or so later we see him rounding the point at the edge of the bay and soon the skipper is bringing the boat / water taxi up to the little dock. We board and are off.

The journey only takes around ten, maybe fifteen minutes, in next to no time we are pulling up at a concrete pier on the island, the buildings are right on the waterfront so we walk in front of them until we come to a little side street (actually it’s more of an alley) and passing between the houses we emerge in what might be described as the “main street”. Time to look around and see what we want to do next…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The dock on the mainland…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Approaching the Island…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 24, 2014

The Workhorses Of The Waterways Carry Heavy Loads…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The River Zaan is like all rivers that run through the Netherlands: it’s more than a waterway, it’s an industrial highway for heavy transport  of a wide variety of goods.

Barges regularly transport large quantities of  things  such as raw materials which are more expensive to transport in bulk by road or rail.

The Zaan isn’t one of the biggest river but it does connect to the River IJ , which is.   Some of the barges are self propelled, long shallow ships built for purpose, but there are also barges which are more like trailers, they are towed by small but powerful tug boats, sometimes in convoys.

In this page of my summer 2012 diary we are visiting the Zaanse Schans area with our visiting Singaporean friend “Velvetine” and during our own tour boat excursion we of course encounter all of the local boat traffic. In my first photograph you see a tug towing one of the “trailer”like barges, in the second photograph after we have passed him by,  it becomes clear just how large the load is…

Little Mr. is most impressed by a bright orange tug that he takes to be a river police vehicle: I’m not certain if it really was, it’s possible that it’s bright orange because it regularly tows flammable materials. Either way, there are barges loading, unloading and in transit all around us on the river… let’s take a look…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zaanse_Schans

November 10, 2013

Two Buildings, Colourful For Different Reasons…

Filed under: BELGIUM,Bruges,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , , , , ,

In continuation of yesterday’s post, I find a set of neighbouring buildings that grab my attention and beg for a post of their own. Close to a bridge, there is a boat dock for tourist canal tours and it’s been decorated with masses of colourful hanging baskets full of flowers. Alongside the boat dock building stands an antique, bric-a-brac and second hand shop, with wooden dolls and merchandise in the windows. Both are colourful for different reasons, interesting and amusing… both deserve a longer and closer look…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

October 30, 2013

Squeezing In A Jaunt On The Water…

Filed under: BELGIUM,Bruges: Canal Trip,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , , , ,

Our Singaporean friend “Velveteen” and I have just enough time before dinner in Bruges, Belgium, to squeeze in one of the tourist boat trips on the city canals. The weather isn’t the best but it’s more rain on the wind and threatening than actual precipitation so far. Here is a photographic post  from Velveteen’s photos  (used with permission) of our trip around the city waterways…

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

Our tour guide…

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

May 3, 2013

Even Rain Clouds Have Silver Linings….

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

One good thing about going on an early morning visit to a family attraction Park on cold, grey and wet day in early April  is that sometimes the crowds appear to have woken up, looked out the window at the bad weather and decided they would rather stay in bed.

Their loss is our gain: we now have a boat ride with a friendly and chatty boat driver who’s delighted to have a few passengers, even if it is only the four of us.

What first looks like a large lake is in fact a series of connected waterways and islands, there are expensive permanent homes dotting the shoreline and some equally expensive holiday houses (although not all of them at in the best of states).

Land is scarce in the Netherlands and a little semi secluded bolt-hole with water access so close to the centre of a major city is a luxury item and a hot ticket if you can find it. Experience with property here tells me that even the more run down places will be worth decent six figure sums so the prices of the larger permanent homes will definitely come into the “if you have to ask, you can’t afford it”  category.

Many of the holiday homes are in little islands so boat docks are the transportation parking areas, no doubt very busy in summer.

Yes, ok it’s raining and the view would be better with sunshine and blue skies, but there’s also something very relaxing about the novelty of having a boat ride like this all to yourself,  we can ask all the questions we like of the friendly skipper, who’s a fund of local knowledge.

The kids of course want to know about the iron tower close to the dock,  some local residents who thought it would be better scrapped but it’s now protected because it’s an old fire department watch tower and getting on for 100 years old.  Sadly for the kids the metal work is no longer safe enough to allow the tourist hordes to climb it, basic repairs keep it in shape but  it would simply cost too much to bring it up to standard for opening to the public.

Once we get back to shore and disembark, I notice an older couple waiting to board… like us they will have the boat entirely to themselves…  even rain clouds have a silver lining.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 23, 2013

(Ooh Just Like the Movies) Quick! ….”Follow THAT Car!”

Filed under: LIFE,PHOTOGRAPHY,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , , , , ,
(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

One of our Brother’s in Law bought a little sail yacht at the beginning of  2012.

For various reasons, by late September we still hadn’t gotten around to seeing it yet and since Himself and the kids have never been in a sailing boat before we organised an impromptu sailing trip together.

So… on what the weather man promises to be one of the last warm days of the summer (the word “warm” being rather relative on this occasion because 2012 was the “summer that wasn’t”) we head out to the In-Law’s home in Delft.

After sorting out kids and gear inside their house BiL warns Himself that the boat is moored at a place that’s a little tricky to get to.

Once we arrive we will have to leave the car and take a ferry boat to another area but the  car parking spot we are heading for is in a paddock off a lane off a side road off a side road, and there is no real address to give to Our Lady of the Tom Tom, so it would be best if we just follow his grey Volvo.

We are just herding the kids back into our car out the front of their house when, Himself exclaims in Dutch:  “That was quick! … come on kids we are away!” and he leaves them rushing to get their seat belts on as he quickly pulls out after the grey Volvo.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

We weave our way around Delft… fine… then Himself remarks “Look! BiL has to Tank” (pulling into petrol station) so we follow him into the petrol station.

We want to go past them and wait for them at the exit because we don’t need fuel, so the kids prepare to wave at BiL and his kids in the other car as we go past… suddenly shocked little voices from the back seat “Papa, that’s not (name) BiL  in that car!

Turns out we are following a grey Volvo… just not the right grey Volvo!

Yes, some poor guy in a grey Volvo is probably wondering why three kids (Kiwi Daughter has a friend along for the day) were grinning and waving madly at him and why the smiles simultaneously changed to shock and disbelief when they suddenly saw his face up close.

Himself is stunned and the rest of us are killing ourselves laughing.

We pull over Himself phones BiL and asks  “Where the heck are you?” to which BiL replies” Well, I‘m at home looking at your empty car parking space wondering where the heck you got to! “(BiL didn’t have our mobile phone number).

Himself explains his mistake to a background noise of giggles and tells him the name of the petrol station we are at and BiL comes and laughingly picks us up some ten minutes later. He winds down his window when he pulls up along side us and jokes “Hey! Himself… do you want to follow me now or have you spied another grey Volvo you’d rather tail?

What are the chances of there being two dark grey Volvo’s of the same model travelling down the same fairly quiet Delft street on a Sunday morning?  ….All too high it seems!

We counted our lucky stars that the previous guy stopped when he did and that hopefully he  hadn’t been intending to drive to Paris!We did later wonder (if he hadn’t stopped) how long we would have gone before we twigged that we weren’t following the right car? (hmpf… it never goes wrong like this in the movies!)

Himself isn’t going to live this down down for a while… and the moral of the story: if you are going to play at  “follow that car”  it might be handy to memorise the number plate to make certain you have the right one !

February 12, 2013

Flat as a Pancake… On The Water!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

We’ve kept an eye on the clock, refrained from buying too much tat at the flea market and have now walked back to the place where we need to be for our appointment.

This in practice means we are standing on a dock.

The second surprise we had for the kids was that we would all be going on a boat tour, but one with a difference: this is “de pannenkoekenboot ” (The Pancake Boat) and you get to eat unlimited pancakes whilst you are given a tour of part of the outer waterways of Amsterdam.

This is not an inner city canal trip, but the part of the IJ that incorporates the “havens” (harbours) .

We had originally tried to book the “Family Cruise” which is a two and a half hour cruise starting at 1.30 p.m. but this tour turned out to be full so our next option was the 16:30 sailing and a trip for on hour. Although I was at first disappointed by the fact that we missed our first choice (we only tried to reserve this the day before so left it too late… the moral of the story is that you need to reserve as early as possible if you want to be guaranteed a specific time slot)  it turned out to be a blessing in disguise.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

First with the earlier sailing we would have been very rushed getting here from our tour of Schiphol Airport, and second the weather is way too cold for outside dining (it’s possible on the top deck in good weather) and the top deck is closed.

This means we are eating on the lower deck, and it’s winter, it’s trying hard to rain and light is fading… for today at least a sailing tour of just one hour is more than enough.

In the height of summer with sunshine and more daylight hours, I think the longer two and a half hour tour would be more exciting because you could see things properly from outside.

One all the tours there are unlimited pancakes;  they start with the three most popular which are natural, spek (bacon) and apple pancakes and you get to add some of the various toppings as well if you want.

I went first for the classic Dutch pancake: spek, where the bacon is cooked into the pancake as it cooks and once it’s done you drizzle stroop (syrup) over it and eat! Stroop is unlike any syrup I’ve ever had outside of the Netherlands, it’s not maple syrup or golden syrup, or Caro or molasses, it has a taste all of it’s own. My second pancake was a plain one with peaches on top… yum!

The rest of the group also had spek, or  plain pancakes with icing sugar (powdered sugar), or in the case of the kids, plain pancakes with a scattering of sweets on top. We were one of  the biggest groups on the boat this sailing so we were allocated a long table near the front of the boat, and there was even a handy little seat for our youngest sailor.

We watched as people streamed onto the NDSM Ferries that go from here to the Houthaven  and Central Station (the ferry ride is free) and then at the appointed moment we too were pushing away from the dock and out into the haven. The pancakes are good!… let’s take a look around…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

September 7, 2012

Going on Holiday But Not by Road…

Filed under: NEW ZEALAND,PHOTOGRAPHY,Traditional — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , , , , ,

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

As we take the Inter-Island ferry between New Zealand’s Wellington and Picton,  we spy something in the Marlborough Sounds that is both typically a New Zealand tradition but also not typical at the same time.

The typical part is the Kiwi  “Batch”  or holiday home… they are often passed down in families through generations and may or may not necessarily be by the sea side, … but they are often the holiday get-a-way for choice for many Kiwis.

All Kiwi’s will know what a  “Batch” is but some might be caught off guard in the south of the South Island where the Scottish settler influence of a century ago has given their holiday homes a completely different name: they go on holiday to the “Crib

The atypical part of  the Batches found throughout the Marlborough Sounds is that a large percentage of them have no road access to them at all …they are accessible only by boat and were built with materials bought in by boat.

There is the solitary Kenepuru  Road that traverses up of Mahau Sound as far the Endeavour Inlet, but anything further north, east or west and the entire Pelorus Sound and the vast extended area that encompasses hundreds, if not thousands of tiny inlets and bays have no roads at all. Let’s take a look at just a few of the Batches  that peep out from some of the bays….

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Next Page »

Blog at WordPress.com.