Local Heart, Global Soul

September 18, 2019

A Very Contained Bridge!

Visiting the Maasvlakte area of the Port of Rotterdam, we came accross a unique solution to a problem. A pipeline needed to cross the road but digging a tunnel underneath would be expensive, likewise for building a permanent structure above. I suppose someone looked around the Port and thought: “What could we use?” and found themselved staring a stacks and stacks of shipping containers. So shipping containers were stacked to make this bridge. It’s certainly solid enough and does the job. Reduce, Recycle, Reuse, the Green way to build a fairly “instant” bridge!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

August 12, 2018

History Being Built All Around The Bridge…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Visiting Christchurch, New Zealand’s city center in the first days of 2018, Himself and I stopped by the Colombo street, bridge.

Not the large overhead bridge that takes traffic across the railway tracks and through the areas of Sydenham and Beckenham to Cashmere on the Port Hills, but the small more historic bridge that crosses the Avon river at Cambridge Terrace.

Located a few blocks north of the Square, and directly next to the Town Hall, this bridge was on one of my walking routes to and from work when I lived in my first flat with two other girls about half a kilometer north of here.

Here on the banks of the Avon I would sometimes come for a lazy weekend picnic lunch with a book under the shade of the trees.

Home cooking was both a habit and a financial necessity but sometimes after my regular trips to the large Public library nearby I bought potato filled sausages and chips as a treat from the snack bar in the little pedestrian alleyway that connected the Library on Gloucester Street to Cathedral Square.

If the weather was warm I’d head two either of two favourite spots.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The first was Victoria Square, one block further from the Library, and just over the road from here and the second was the bank of the river.

Victoria Square usually won in the evenings because the fountain used to change colours and was beautiful to sit by on a bench with my hot dinner.

The river bank usually won if I wanted some summer weekend peace and quiet.

A tight budget meant my hobbies were simple by necessity and sitting reading or watching the world go by cost nothing and were equally enjoyable.

There were mobile phones back then but they were the size of bricks, cost a ton and no one I knew owned one.

We didn’t even dream, and it was never an issue.

It’s strange to look at those river banks now, there are construction materials everywhere, in all directions I see the city razed and slowly being rebuilt.

I take my camera and do a slow three hundred and sixty degree series of photographs …apologies I didn’t get them in complete chronological order.

I’m also trying to remember the name of the restaurant on the banks that used to serve meals unlike any other restaurant at the time, it was a family place you could line up and order various meals (roast chicken, beef or pork with roast veggies, kid friendly food) and then there were booths where you would sit after you got your meals.

It used to be here very close to this bridge if I remember correctly, but I last went there as a kid so don’t remember precisely where. So many changes will be taking place around here in the next years… this bridge may be historical but one day we will look back on this moment in time, when history was being built …or rather, rebuilt all around here.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 19, 2018

Spiraling Around The Helix…

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY,SINGAPORE — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , , , ,

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Leaving Singapore’s “Gardens by the Bay”, Family Kiwidutch exit the Marina Bay Sands Hotel and make our way to the Helix bridge.

It’s the pedestrian bridge next to the  Bayfront and Benjamin Shares road bridges and appears to be well used.

I saw the bridge from the Observation deck of the Marina Bay Sands in this post:“Gardens, Floating? Bridges? Not Necessarily In That Order…”  but getting up close to this beautiful spiral bridge is necessary in order to appreciate it’s amazing design.

I was not the only tourist taking photographs from all points of the  Helix bridge, the views across the Marina Bay area towards the CBD, the Merlion and the Float Marina area, are all well deserving of being recorded. Wikipedia tells me:

The Helix Bridge was opened on 18 July 2010 and completed the walkway around Marina Bay.

Canopies (made of fritted-glass and perforated steel mesh) are incorporated along parts of the inner spiral to provide shade for pedestrians. The bridge has four viewing platforms sited at strategic locations which provide stunning views of the Singapore skyline and events taking place within Marina Bay.At night, the bridge will be illuminated by a series of lights that highlight the double-helix structure, thereby creating a special visual experience for the visitors.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Pairs of coloured letters c and g, as well as a and t on the bridge which are lit up at night in red and green represent Cytosine, Guanine, Adenine, and Thymine, the four bases of DNA.

The intentional left handed DNA-like design, which is the opposite of normal DNA on earth, earned it a place in The Left Handed DNA Hall of Fame in 2010.

It won the ‘World’s Best Transport Building’ award at the World Architecture Festival Awards in the same year.

From the outset, the project posed several challenges. There was a desire for the plan view of the bridge to be curved in an arc, such that it joins the foreshore promenades on either side seamlessly.

Furthermore, it was desirable to create a lightweight structure, in contrast to the adjacent 6-lane vehicle bridge which is rather heavy in appearance.Due to the tropical climate, the brief also required the bridge to provide shade and shelter against direct sunshine and heavy rainfall. The combination of these factors, together with the desire to create a landmark structure, led to a novel and unique design.The resulting bridge comprises two delicate helix structures that act together as a tubular truss to resist the design loads. The helix tubes only touch each other in one position, under the bridge deck.

The two spiraling members are held apart by a series of light struts and rods, as well as stiffening rings, to form a rigid structure.The 280 m bridge is made up of three 65 m spans and two 45 m end spans.If the steel were stretched out straight from end to end, it would measure 2.25 km in length. The major and minor helices, which spiral in opposite directions, have an overall diameter of 10.8 m and 9.4 m respectively, about 3 stories high.

Over the river, the bridge is supported by unusually light tapered stainless steel columns, which are filled with concrete. The columns form inverted tripod shapes which support the bridge above each of the pilecaps. The bridge weighs around 1700 tonnes in total.The final pieces of the design are a series of ovular-shaped cantilevered viewing ‘pods’, each with capacity for about 100 people, that extend out on the bay side to create ‘ring-side’ viewing for water events. Hundred of workers have contributed to the completion of the bridge.”

And from a visit four years previous:
“Helix Bridge … DNA and Child’s Play…”

Wikipedia / Helix Bridge / Singapore

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

January 16, 2015

A Bridge Over Untroubled Waters Of Two Nations…

Filed under: LIECHTENSTEIN,PHOTOGRAPHY,SWITZERLAND,Vaduz — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , ,
(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The Liechtenstein capital of Vaduz sits just a stone’s throw from the Rhine river.

The Rhine is a demarcation of the Liechtenstein and Swiss border, with half of the river belonging to each country.

Further on the north side where we first entered Liechtenstein, we crossed a road bridge, but here close to Vaduz stands another bridge that clearly has some history.

I found a few websites that have me some information (links included at end of this post). Since one of the sites is in German, I’ve combined some snippets of information from both here, in italics.

“The “Alte Rheinbrücke”, (The Old Rhine Bridge of Vaduz-Sevelen) was built in the years 1870-1871 and is a covered wooden bridge linking the municipalities of Vaduz , the capital of Liechtenstein and Sevelen in the canton of St. Gallen, Switzerland. Measuring 135 metres in length, it was completed in 1901 and is today the only remaining wooden bridge spanning the alpine Rhine. Until the 19th century dams on the Rhine were not regulated in the border area between Liechtenstein and Switzerland, (with a few exceptions) and therefore could flow as free as possible.

The passenger and cargo transport, therefore, was carried out by Rhine ferries that were maintained between Liechtenstein and Switzerland in the early 19th century. 

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Another wooden bridge was, erected at the same spot 30 years earlier.

 Due to the increase  of water from the Rhine dams, the bridge had to be raised in the years 1874/1875 and 1886 .

Poor structural condition finally made a new building necessary due to damage caused by the two raisings meant that in the years 1900/1901 the bridge was finally rebuilt on the piers of the previous bridge.

 Between then and 1975 the bridge served both motorized and no-motorized traffic (up to a payload of 3.5 tons)  but in 1927 a flood from a dam breakage in Schaan damaged the bridge which was then repaired and raised once again.

 In 1975  a new concrete bridge was created over the Rhine about two hundred meters south to accommodate modern motorized traffic, so the Old Rhine Bridge now services only non-motorized traffic making it particularly popular with cyclists. The last major renovation took place in 2009/2010. “

Just to illustrate the statement that the bridge was popular with cyclists, one cyclist conviently crossed from the Swiss side of the bridge to the Liechtenstein side… one of the easiest border crossings in the world! (In the photograph below we see the 1975 road bridge).

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Alte Rheinbrücke Vaduz–Sevelen  (Text in German language)

Old bridge over the Rhine in Vaduz

November 27, 2014

Bridging The Gap Between People And The Natural World…

Filed under: LIFE,PHOTOGRAPHY,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

There are some features in the European landscape that are totally unfamiliar to me as a New Zealander.

Of course, as a dual national and Dutch citizen I’m used to flat land, canals and windmills and since I’ve lived here I’ve gotten used to seeing castles and ancient buildings… but some things make me do a double take.

One of these things is the European “nature bridge” or “land bridge”.

New Zealand is a country the size of the United Kingdom and The Netherlands combined but with a population of only around four million people, it’s a country of small by-ways rather than of mega large highways.

It’s also of course a country with huge land areas for forests and wildlife so conflict between the needs of wildlife and people is not much of an issue.

Stock such as deer are in New Zealand kept in with special fences, but some sheep stations are so large that minimal fencing on small roads in the norm.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Larger agricultural stock such as sheep and cows have right-of-way on New Zealand roads, and Kiwi drivers know that drivers rarely walk away intact from an impact with stock so respect and caution is practised on rural roads especially at night.

In Europe there are so many multi-laned motorways and built up areas that stock are are more confined to specific areas, and with natural feeding grounds in other areas this results in a conflict of interest when it comes to animals like deer wanting to cross the road and these roads being six laned arterial motorways.

Europe’s answer to to this is the land bridge: wide bridges in strategic places across motorways that are fenced along the sides, the fences then screed with trees and planted further with trees or shrubs.

They are funnels that channel wildlife across road systems from one nature area to another and I think they are are brilliant solution to a very basic problem of wild animals and human beings living in close proximity to each other.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

November 12, 2013

Determination Means Not Ever Giving Up, No Matter What (Or How Long) It Takes…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

This isn’t my first visit to Bruges.  I was last here with my parents in 1988 because we were visiting relatives in The Netherlands and made a week long side trip that incorporated London and an overnight stop in Bruges on the way back.

Back then it was literally a whistle-stop visit, we arrived in the afternoon, I was able to visit Michelangelo’s  statue of  Madonna in the Church of Our Lady. All I remember of the church was a quick glimpse of the statue because we arrived minutes before the churched closed for the day and joined at least a hundred other tourists who were also trying to get a last minute peek.

My one precious (film was very expensive) photograph was a beautifully blurred example because I got elbowed by someone as I clicked the shutter closed, but I still kept the photo for a long time afterwards because it was a reminder and proof  that I had really seen a real Michaelangelo.  You can imagine my pride as I pulled the photo out with the apology, “I know the photo’s not great but that white blurred blob really IS a real Michelangelo statue!”.  I remembered absolutely nothing else about the interior of the church, but it was something behind the church that has been the driving force behind my wish to return here ever since that d.ay

My father had a back problem and had been tired out by an incident earlier :  His mother (my Dutch Oma) had requested a special sort of  chocolate from Bruges. We had very limited time on that trip and the shops were starting to shut, but my father hadn’t managed to track down these elusive favourites and he openly admitted that he was too scared to go back to her without them.

Therefore i witnessed my father literally running from one chocolate shop to another minutes before closing time trying to find what he wanted. Finally there was a lady who was actually trying to close the shop door to lock up for the night, but had answered “yes we have those, but we are closed so please come back tomorrow” to the question my father has asked.

He was however so intent on not leaving empty handed that he jammed his foot in the door and then the rest of him, and refused to budge until the lady sold him what he wanted.  Witnessing your father physically wrestling with the door that this Belgium lady was just as intent on closing was one of those life’s images burned into my brain. My mother and I thought it was all very comical but for him it was no laughing matter. Eventually the lady gave up trying to evict him and with a lot of muttering and grumbling because the till had already been closed she sold him the chocolates he wanted.

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

Afterwards my Mother dared to ask if we could try one… the glare we both received told us that probably the second worst thing to facing Oma without her favourite chocolates would be facing her with a depleted supply, so it was more than our lives were worth to dare touch that little gift wrapped cardboard box.

After this incident we had managed our few minutes inside the church and now that all the drama and rush was over,  all my father wanted to do was to collapse back at the hotel.  It was a beautiful summer’s night and the hotel was close by so I elected to walk around the church first and set out by myself.  I remember the stillness of the evening as I stumbled upon a little bridge over the canal,  situated just behind the church: there were beautiful buildings on the canal around it and I was completely and utterly alone.

The evening light was magical and the stillness,  solitude and peace  of the moment in this beautiful spot left a lasting impression.  I spent about twenty minutes there before other people arrived and the spell was broken.

Ever since that day I knew I wanted to return one day to that one little spot in Bruges, and now decades later I have finally done it. Amazingly the details were exactly as I remembered,  even the weather was similar, but unfortunately this time there was no total solitude and silence.  A constant stream of tourists kept coming to the bridge, photographs would be taken at each end and in the middle… getting photos without “extra’s” posing in them became a the challenge that I was determined to win. It took a while but Velveteen and I were determined, patient and at least partially successful.

This post therefore has become one of persistence on many levels, and whilst I have no idea what the canal or this area are officially called, the little path across the bridge becomes a cherished trip down memory lane.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Velveteen)used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen)used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen)used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen)used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen)used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen)used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen)used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen)used with permission

July 31, 2013

Tunneling North Through the Dartford Crossing…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Last summer we took our visiting Singaporean friend on a big adventure, we have been visiting friends of the Kiwidutch family in Folkestone and are now heading a little north of London.

We are a little worried about the traffic around London and around the Dartford Crossing because we had heard many horror stories of traffic delays there.

I expected to find two bridges there but was surprised to see that there is a tunnel going under the river if you are heading northwards and a gigantic bridge to cross instead if you are travelling southwards.

It’s a toll road and although there is wall to wall of traffic on both directions our northward flow keeps moving at a steady flow so it didn’t take too long before we were out the other side and moving at proper motorway pace once again.

The motor way traffic is kind too despite more predictions of bad traffic problems due to the 2012 Olympics running at the same time in nearby London and we managed to reach our next destination in almost a “normal” amount of time. Our destination is just a short distance from Stansted Airport: the village of Great Dunmow.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 4, 2013

Winching Out the Historical Heavyweights…

Filed under: BELGIUM,Mechelen,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , , , , , ,
(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I have a few photographs from Mechelen that I didn’t really feel fitted in with any of my posts so far… but I also didn’t want to leave them out.

The first was a photograph on the same information board as the information for the Duivelshuis, Het Paradijs and Sint Joseph’s houses, which depicted a crane. Not a crane in any recognisable form as we might know it today, this “contraption” is clearly both huge and heavy, so I was stunned to read that it was traditionally operated by children. I know that  child labour has a very long and often shameful history throughout centuries past, but surely this one takes the cake?

I only have to think of my own children’s skinny little limbs to shudder at the thought of them being expected to work on docks unloading ships. The text that accompanies the photograph reads:

“Crane Bridge. As the name suggests this was the site of a crane. It was built of wood in the fifteenth century. Operated by the “crane children”, it was used to unload ships. It was demolished in 1887. Before that, in the Middle Ages there had been a footbridge here, followed by a stone bridge. The present-day metal swing bridge dates from 1986.”

Then there are the shoe scrapers… they were used to scrape the mud off your shoes before entering the house and I’ve often seen them in Europe as metal attachments to walls, often in lovely wrought iron forms, but this is the very first time I’ve ever seen one embedded into the wall itself.

Lastly there are the banners, …at first I had no clue who the medieval lady might be, or indeed that it might be a representation of any real person at all, but after my research  it all becomes clear, this is of course the heroine of Mechelen: Margaret of Austria.  I was delighted to read that when the main cities of Belgium were asked to pick someone famous from their history to be their “emblem”  and “representitive” that Mechelen alone chose a woman, and a most eminently noteworthy one at that. Bravo!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

May 20, 2012

A City of Sails, Maze of Roads, a Bridge and a Big Sigh of Relief for the Tom Tom…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

In part of my retroactive diary tour of New Zealand, we are heading into Auckland…. New Zealand’s biggest city.

We come in close to Pukekohe  near the bottom of  the map (pronounced as “pook-ah-coe-ee“) and are later exit north on the road by the top of the map by Albany. This will necessitate crossing the Auckland Harbour via the Auckland Harbour Bridge, since it’s the short-cut route across the harbour.

The city is actually a merger of Manukau city and Manukau harbour on side, and Auckland city and Auckland harbour on the other.

Only a narrow  band of  land joins the landmass of Northland to the rest of the North Island … and the countries biggest city straddles this strip of land, so needless to say we aren’t looking forward to the traffic jams we think we might be in for.

Luckily after a stop in the city to see a family member, we manage to hit the road  at a less busy time and somehow, miracle of miracles, without any great hassle or stops.

Of course upon reflection that fact that tomorrow is New Year’s Eve, that it’s the summer school holiday period and that many New Zealand businesses close between Christmas and New Year, probably had more to do with the lack of congestion than good timing on our part.

I remember trips to Auckland in my childhood,  a South Island girl overawed by the existence of a motorway system that carried more traffic than I’d ever seen in my life before,  I live of course with motorways now, in The Netherlands but I’m in Europe, so that seems kind of  normal and expected with such a large population to move around, whereas I never got used to motorways in New Zealand and the sum total of one  five kilometres long to the north of Christchurch really doesn’t count.

Auckland’s motorways were today more or less as  I remembered them… but they’ve grown from the toddler sized network of my childhood into a full grown version today, so much so that I thought  several times that we must surely be in Auckland city, long before we actually reached it.

This is one time we are very thankful for the TomTom we picked up from Teddy our favourite rental car owner before setting out for the North Island, during our travels throughout  Auckland the thing is definitely paying it’s way.

The rain is still coming down in fits and starts and the cloud layer is very low, so we can’t even see the top of Auckland’s Sky Tower, … but we still get glimpses of the Auckland, and bridge and the marina’s around it that give it the nickname “the  City of Sails”.

I didn’t notice it at the time, but after putting the photos onto the computer I saw that I’d captured an image of tourists walking over the top span of the Auckland Harbour Bridge… I’d love to be brave enough to do that one day but think that my head for heights (actually great lack of it) is rooted deep in my Dutch genes and since you know I’m accident prone, it’s another activity that I think might be safer to dream about than actually do.

Now that our Auckland appointment is out of the way, we head even further northward, Northland awaits…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Juxtaposition of the roof of a typical  traditional New Zealand villa against a modern skyline… I might get nostalgic for the sight of a brick chimney too, since there are precious few left in Christchurch after the earthquakes.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

January 24, 2012

Helix Bridge … DNA and Child’s Play…

Filed under: Landmarks,PHOTOGRAPHY,SINGAPORE,Travel — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , , , , ,

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

My next photographic “target” on Singapore’s Duck  Tour sits right next to the ArtScience Museum and Gallery of  the day before yeaterday’s post.

If you have been a reader of my blog for any length of time, then you will know how much I appreciate old stuff, especially old stuff made in stone, wood, wrought iron, hand blown or leaded glass.

I love “antique”, I adore “quirky” and I appreciate craftsmanship and detail in many different mediums.
That said, sometimes a little bit of “modern” can catch my eye and turn my head as well. This is one of those times.

This bridge is known as the “Helix Bridge” and so logically enough, it was no surprise to find out from our Duck Tour guide that the design is based on the double helix format of DNA strands.

Wikipedia tells me that:

“Canopies (made of fritted-glass and perforated steel mesh) are incorporated along parts of the inner spiral to provide shade for pedestrians.

The bridge has four viewing platforms sited at strategic locations which provide stunning views of the Singapoe skyline and events taking place within Marina Bay. At night the bridge is illuminated by a series of lights that highlight the double-helix structure.

Pairs of coloured letters “c” and “g” as well as “a” and “t” on the bridge light up at night in red and green to represent cytosine, guanine, adenine and thymine, the four bases of DNA. “

I just like the simplicity and cleaness of the structure… it’s pleasing and harmonous in it’s purity of line, and I find the grace of the interwoven curves mesmerising.     …And I knew I liked it even more when I found this little snippet of information on Wikipedia: “the bridge also functions as a gallery where children’s paintings and drawings are exhibited for public viewing.”

So, beautiful indeed, on so many levels.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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