Local Heart, Global Soul

November 1, 2017

The Real Stars Of The Show Were The Cakes…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

In this last post from my night out learning how to decorate a cake, I set out with my fellow classmates to try and make  decent decoration with fondant.

I had an idea of what I wanted to achieve because I’d seen something on the internet but no real clue about how to go about it.

The first thing was to choose two blocks of ready-mixed fondant colours from the shop stock,  there were small amounts of other colours available from our tutor or we could arrange swaps around the table with other classmates.

I managed to get brown from the tutor which was pretty much all I needed. I wanted to sculpt a the head of a giraffe from my fondant, so with a print from the internet to go by, I set to work.

I found it easier then I expected in some ways, harder in others.

For instance sticking on the flat brown pieces was harder than it looked because you had to paint the back of the fondant piece with just the right amount of water: too little and it didn’t stick, too much and the piece would slide down the cake. I ended up holding quite a few pieces whilst they dried out a bit and this took up precious time. Time in fact was my biggest enemy, if I had tried this at home I would have sat down at a good moment when I had some energy and worked slowly.

The unused fondant pieces keep, and can be stored in a plastic bag so they don’t dry out so this would be an ideal project to have completed over a week. Instead my effort is a bit of a rush job, which is why my giraffe looks more like a dragon instead of a giraffe.Still, as a first attempt it was a learning project and if you got into doing this regularly (which I am not) then you would learn how to use the modeling tools and would get better at it. This was a strange mix of “I knew I could have done better’ and “not unhappy for a first attempt”.

The shop has every tool, cake form and item imaginable for cake decoration. There are even edible coloured powders, two of which I used (brown, and then a hint of gold) to dry ‘paint’ onto my cake. Again the time constraints didn’t help but practice would make perfect there too.The real stars of the show however, were the students cakes; some were for upcoming birthday parties or special occasions, my friend was going to gift hers to her neighbour who always helped her out if she needed a cake pan or other item. The rest, like mine were just heading home to be looked at and devoured…  what good is a pretty cake after all if it can’t be eaten!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

October 30, 2017

Step-By-Step Tutorial: Fondant Cover Your Cake, Wrinkle Free, Part I.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

As usual I am all up in the air when it comes to concentration.

In yesterday’s post about Step-By-Step Tutorial: Fondant Cover Your Cake, Wrinkle Free, Part II    I managed to miss out quite a few photographs near the beginning that will probably be helpful.

This is why I have labeled this in the title as “Part I” and amended yesterday’s title to ” Part II”.

When I discovered my error I had  several options: leave them out and hope that anyone following my tutorial manages to muddle along anyway (duh, No!), re-do the post completely or, since there were quite a few photographs missing, make a new post detailing what was missed.

Of course it goes without saying that the last option was the only realistic one I would take.

The photographs concern the first part of when the fondant goes onto the cake, and since as the saying goes ” a picture is worth a thousand words” here are the photographs you will need if you are following this tutorial. The block of fondant is kneaded with the heel of the hand until it is soft enough to pull out without breaking off.After using the rolling pin to transfer the fondant to the cake you use the same technique as in yesterdays post to slowly cover the cake.

The real part that I missed was that when the fondant goes over the rim of the cake, use the inside edges of both hands to bring it in neatly. Then very gently pull out the fondant (but not stretch it!) so that the wrinkles are removed from the section you are working on, pat that section in neatly and then keep turn the cake on the turntable a small distance and repeat the easing out, patting in neatly, turning, making sure that you are slowly heading evenly towards the bottom of the cake.

It’s important to read these two posts as one instruction as a whole rather than attempting to do everything in one post and then everything in the other. Apologies for the jumbled up intermingled parts, my brain was not in gear when I labeled the many photographs I took , hence the mess. The last photos are the efforts of my friend and I: if we could manage to do this first attempt, then so can you!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

October 28, 2017

Step-By-Step Tutorial: Filling And Preparing Cake For Fondant Layer…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Back in March of this year my best friend took me out for an evening workshop: to learn how to decorate a cake!

It was her treat and so having arrived and gotten acquainted with our tutor and fellow classmates the lesson began.

My New Zealand Grandmother always held to the idea that people interesting in cooking fall into two categories: Cooks and Bakers.

She was a Baker, I am most definitely a Cook. I can do biscuits (cookies) these days with help, but leave me alone with a cake recipe and I break out in a cold sweat.

After all, I hold the family record for once baking a cake that was flatter when it came out of the oven than it was before it went in.

In my naivety I did panic that we would have to bake our own cakes first but was assured to see pre-baked cakes wrapped in cling-film on the table when we arrived. Gone these days is baking every cake from scratch: all of these cakes are made with a special mix. I suppose that it is this way for speed and efficiency but somehow I would miss the ritual of creaming butter and sugar and tasting the batter at the end of the process: especially in my case because the batter is in all likelihood going to be better than the finished product.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Since pain and medication mess with my memory I documented the process in several parts and yes, it’s taken me until the end of the year to sort the photos and make a step-by-step tutorial. Better late than never.

Not that I have much experience with cakes, but my few attempts at filling one have been done wrong every time. (Why on earth was I not surprised?).

This tutorial sets me on the straight and narrow when it comes to remedying my errors.  I have always felt that “making do” with implements around the house was more than fine when it came to cakes. Having now used a few specialist tools for the first time I now realise what an enormous difference they make.

Of course you don’t need everything, but if you really want to decorate cakes on a regular basis I can not recommend a rotating stand, and an adjustable wire cake cutter enough.

Before pushing your cake cutter wire through your cake, make a small cut with a knife where the wire will first touch the cake: this gives a far smoother entry point for the wire and your cake won’t “tear’ as the wire goes in. Gently slide the wire through the cake: speed is not necessary, it is more important to concentrate on not accidentally lifting the wire up as you go. Going smoothly, slow and steady will help ensure that your cut section is even all the way through.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

After your cake is sliced through (we were cutting our cakes into three parts) we were given a piping bag with Creme Patissiere in it (it’s like a thick custard) and told to first pipe a line around the rim of our first cake layer. This raised layer helps keep the rest of the filling in later.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The second bag was a thinner filling (I am now struggling to remember if it was also Creme Patissiere or not) and once that is smoothed out the next layer of cake is put on top, but then a thin layer of Creme Patissiere is spread on top, filled secondly by a ring of Creme Patissiere around the outside edge. (slightly the opposite of the first cake layer).

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

This raised edge  gives a boundary that stops the next layer (jam) from leaking down the sides of the cake. The jam, (strawberry in our case) fills the inner part of the second filling layer. This starts to make sense because it will make a tidier outside layer later on.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Then the top layer of cake went on and a thin, light coating of icing went on to be the “undercoat’ for the fondant layer that is to come in my next post.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

This post is all about learning how to do the filling between the cake layers first. Nothing like there being good preparation! Since it was too difficult to take the “action” shots whilst working on my own cake, these are a compilation of photos between my own cake and that of my friend, where I photographed her doing the piping etc. My next post will be a step by step tutorial about getting fondant neatly onto your cake without a single wrinkle or a moment of frustration!

October 27, 2017

Having The Patience To Decorate Cakes…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Winter is never my favourite season because I am somewhat allergic to short days, long dark nights and cold temperatures.

If Himself and I were to believe in incarnation then I’d hazard a guess that in a previous life I had been a tomato.

Himself was probably a chili pepper, and we are well suited to one another because we would both choose a tropical getaway over a skiing holiday in a nanosecond.

My current situation does not lend itself to getting out and about much, so to kick me out of the house and have some fun my best friend organised for us both to attend a cake decorating workshop in the Hague early in the year.

I have the patience to decorate cakes, providing there are no serious time constraints, and there are not kids underfoot, since I have “Been there, Done that” and can sincerely say that it was not in any way a success, at least on a practical level.

It’s beyond frustrating to see one of your offspring squeezing the last of the icing out of the bags into a puddle on your dining room table just to see how the colours mix.

Of course those exact bags were the ones you had set aside to finish the other half of the big cake you were working on, everything had started well but now you have run out steam,  exhausted, and to add insult to injury the kids have  disappeared leaving you with a kitchen and dining room table that look like a bomb went off in a food coloring factory.

The extension was in the table so that everyone had enough place to work in, now icing is solidifying in the crack between the table sections, the food colouring trail leads as far as the door handle and goodness knows how much further beyond, there are splatters of icing on the floor and you are so tired that you feel like sleeping face down in your incomplete cake.

In the kitchen looks like you used every dish you own (probably did) and the sink is filed to overflowing (my pet hate) so it feels like a day’s work to get it empty let alone start the washing up.

In contrast, in years gone by I could wait until the kids had surrendered to their early bedtime,  then start in peace, all the bits and pieces I needed set out neatly on the dining room table. Then the kids grew big enough to “Help” and chaos ensued. To make matters more complicated, if my offspring were not stuffing their mouths with cake or biscuits (cookies), they were singing the praises of the experience: “This has been great fun‘, “Can we do this again next weekend?”,Mama, I love you, You are the best!”, although to be fair, this bit generally takes place after the wreckage in my kitchen and the carnage on the dining room table has been eradicated by the parents. They know how to choose their moments, my kids. Of course you have to remember too the most frustrating thing of all: I said I had the patience to decorate cakes, .. I didn’t  say I was any good at it.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

May 8, 2015

IF It Doesn’t Go Well … Eat The Evidence !!!

Filed under: FOOD,kid stuff: Birthday Cakes,PHOTOGRAPHY,Recipes — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , , ,
(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Last year I discovered a silicone baking form that was in the shape of a train.

One of our friends has a son who is  seriously, wild & categorically addicted to anything that resembles his hero: Thomas the train, and I knew that a train birthday cake  would probably be very well received.

Since neither me for my friend has ever used silicone much before in cooking, we thought it would be wise to have a test run before the day so that we could see if the cake for really worked or not.

I’m a hopeless cake baker so stuck to my favourite cake mixture: “Lynn’s Lucious Chocolate Cake, step-by-step idiot proof cake“!

Thinking that a single batch of the recipe would do just fine, I copy this idea and poured the cake mixture into the pan. Once the cake was in the oven, it was really clear that  one lot of batter would not be enough.  My friend had used melter butter on the inside of the form so the cake came out it  rather well.

The cake form is not evenly filled throughout , and it’s a bit wobbly , but my cake is cooked and now is the moment of triumph or disaster: will the cake release easily as the manufacturing sales tell us it should. The cake left the form remarkably  easily and  it was “kind of”  a success. It didn’t take Family Kiwidutch and friends long to eat the evidence…All we need to do now is to try again!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Lynn’s Luscious Chocolate Cake, step-by-step idiot-proof cake !

December 7, 2014

Car Manufacturers Have Missed A Trick…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Long car journey’s are difficult for our kids, they can accept fourteen hour flights to Singapore and then another ten on to New Zealand, and know that there’s no bugging the pilots to ask to stop at a playground please, but when parents are the chauffeur in question, it’s a completely different story.

We have no sooner left The Hague when they are restless in their seats and it’s only a matter of time before sibling tensions rise.

One announces that they want to sleep and asks for quiet in the  car please, so this is the cue that the other  needs to decide that this is the perfect moment to break into song:  and of course not a complete  song you understand, but rather the two or three lines that they sort-of know  from the chorus, with the missing words that they didn’t catch randomly invented to sort-of fit.

Sung in tune, (or maybe not), as loud as they can get away with and as repetitively as possible.

After four, or six or ten renditions of these few song lines their sibling is seething and muttering loudly that it’s not fair.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Offended sibling then breaks into the “la la la ” song, (preferably off key), also as loud as they think they can get away with and says defiantly “Well if he (she) is allowed to sing then so can I“….  and so ensues a catastrophic rise in volume levels, dispersed with mutterings of complaints until one of the parents blows a gasket and reminds their offspring of the saying “third class riding is better than first class walking“.

Attention is given by both offspring for about 14 seconds and then they choose to throw caution to the wind, ignore their parents and begin the process all over again.

All those automotive advertisements of beautiful children smiling angelically at each other in the back seat are a demonic ploy to dupe parents into thinking that the “family car journey” is a simply brilliant idea.

If ever I wondered where my first grey hairs came from, then all I need to do is to remember these journeys. All becomes crystal clear.

I suspect that the more chaotic scenario is re-enacted between siblings during long car journey’s all over the world. I think that car manufactures have missed a trick. Seriously, what would really  revive the car industry is the invention of a vehicle where each kid gets a window and/or their own little cell capsule that’s 100% portioned off from their siblings.

Each capsule would be one hundred percent sound insulated , parents would have the option of listening in or tuning out but each child would be in perfect isolation as far as contact from one another was concerned.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

One child could sing and another child could sleep no problem.

Reclining beds would be a bonus feature, but only if it could also be designed around having to transport :  summer camping gear and paraphernalia / winter ski clothing and paraphernalia / all other travelling paraphernalia / cool boxes full of food / boxes of gifts /extra blankets / toys /  and of course the family suitcases.

Come on car designers, don’t you like a challenge?

It took us about six and a half hours to complete the drive: the distance is just under five hours drive but we hit road works in a few places, went slow in queues for whatever reason in others and of course also stopped for lunch.

We are all tired when we arrive in Frankfurt, you can tell you are getting close when the planes from Frankfurt’s airport are flying in low to land… we peer at the tower outside of the city, the top getting lost in low cloud and make our way to our friends apartment.

Our friends have been checking out of their window every now and again for us for a while and are on the street to meet us when we pull into our parking space. Then they help Himself with suitcases and take us inside for a good dose of German cakes. Sugar. Even better, chocolate flavoured sugar. A brilliantly excellent remedy for even the worst long distance car journeys. It repairs even the grumpiest of dispositions. These good friends know us well.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 8, 2013

A Bigger Star In Some Families Than In Others…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

If you want a super-traditional (and slightly old-fashioned) Dutch dessert to try out for size then you need look no further than your local Dutch supermarket.

However you aren’t going to find this classic cake in the cake section and this is probably the reason that it’s gone largely undiscovered by many a visitor or new settler in the Netherlands,  because  it’s found unexpectedly instead the freezer section of the supermarket.

This dessert is called a ” Sneeuster” (Snow Star) and is basically two cake layers with a filling of  “advocaat” (egg nog) and cream.

In our extended family this was well known with all of  Himself’s cousins because it was a particular favourite of their Oma (grandmother) who was my mother in law’s sister.

Because Himself’s mother didn’t like this one as much, this was rarely seen on our side of the family and although Himself already knew of  it from many childhood visits to his Aunt,  I also only discovered it relatively recently when one of Himself’s cousins came to stay with us.

Naturally the cream and egg nog layers thaw once it’s been out of the freezer a little while,  so I thought it prudent to cut all of the pieces of the cake whilst it fresh out of the freezer before the cream and egg nog got squishy. For my own personal preference, this is too creamy, but I have to temper that statement by honestly saying that I don’t particularly like any  heavily creamed dessert so this was never destined to be a contender for my personal favourite.

Clearly in some families the Sneeuster is going to be more of a star then in others…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

December 20, 2011

Heading Home and an Aunty who bakes a Seriously Delicious Cake…

Filed under: Kids and Family,LIFE,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , , , ,

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

We have an appointment to meet up with family  in The Netherlands today, so we make a relatively early start and head towards the border 14 kms away leaving the low hills of the German countryside behind us.

On the smaller roads the border crossing is little  more than a sign announcing that we are now in The Netherlands.  Oops… blurry photo,  taking photos of road signs while travelling at substantial speed is an artform that I needs to perfect. LOL

… and once we arrived  for our family visit  there was coffee and home made cake waiting for us. Tante (Aunt) E’s speciality was delicious,  had walnuts and … yum, I don’t know what else, but hope to score the recipe because it was GOOD!

It was an interesting meeting because they and his parents had had some sort of falling out decades earlier (seems to happen in families more often than not, I discover) and when the parents stopped meeting,  their children automatically get cut out of the same family circle.

A chance remark from another relative about a year earlier showed that this Aunt and Uncle were keen to renew contact and Himself was keen since he had distant memories of childhood meetings.  I have no clue what the feud had been about (probably something stupidly inconsequential  in Life’s larger scheme of things and not really worth falling out over if similar events in my family are anything to go by) but none of it was our grudge so why not renew contact?

We clicked with them right away and were both delighted to have taken the step that restored the family links. We will now keep in good contact and have promised to  bring the  kids with us next time.

For Himself and I however, the  road home to said children beckons, and happy and relaxed after our short break we head homewards…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 18, 2010

“Cars” making a kid’s Birthday Cake … step-by-step.

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY,The Hague — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , , ,

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Here’s a follow up article to my “Lynn’s Luscious Chocolate Cake, step-by-step idiot-proof cake”  article  of 16th February.

Once you have you cake successfully baked, then what?

For me,  one year ago, my about-to-turn-Four-year old wanted a “Cars” cake.

Ackkk ! What did I know about cake decorating? a few well meaning attempts make not a professional cake maker.

First I go to Google and see that might be out there for inspiration, I find a cake, decide I like it, but fail to see how I can construct it as good as they did.

Ok, improvise.

First,  I mix a little icing sugar (powder sugar) and orange flower water and water to make a not too thick glaze, with this, I sandwich the two halves of my cake together.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Then I cut a slice of each edge of the cake,  the cuts run parallel to each other, one each side of the cake. This forms the main body of the car. The “spare” bits that I cut off get cut a little shorter and joined up to make the roof of  the  car.  (I’m keeping it very simple)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I made a super-thin glaze that I  use to “crumb coat” the  cake and let this set. This seals in the crumbs so that the next layer of icing can be applied  cleanly without all the crumbs falling off the cake constantly and muddying the icing.

Then I coat a biscuit (cookie) with icing and place it at the read to make the back spoiler,  ice the cake in red, adding some white for the windows and some  M&M’s for the “eyes”. I use some shop bought biscuits for the wheels and decorate the “trailer” with sweets.

I was working  in a freezing cold  January kitchen with the heating on so that my fingers could actually function, so keeping my icing from either going solid or melting into a soppy pool was hard work.

Luckily Little Mr. was ecstatic with the result despite the flaws…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Here are some other cakes I have decorated using the same chocolate cake base…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

.. and finally one that the kids decorated themselves ( there’s a line down the middle because their definition of “half” was a bit too greedy at first)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

So, Now you have a great cake recipe, and a few ideas for decoration… get the kids involved and have fun, believe me, even if it’s less than perfect your kids will still love it (and you) to bits !

December 9, 2009

Ingredient Confusion: Chipolata Cake? …you are kidding, aren’t you?

Filed under: FOOD,PHOTOGRAPHY,Recipe Confusion — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , , , , ,

(photo © kiwidutch)

When I’m sitting with my New Zealand family and someone mentions that they need to remember to bring chipolata’s to a BBQ pot-luck or meal, then it’s taken as fact that they will be bringing sasuages, to be more specific:  long slender sasuages that BBQ or fry up rather nicely and are very popular with adults and children alike.

No problem right? “Chipolata’s” originated in Italy and their name  cames from the Italian word “cipolla’  for “onion”, (one of the main ingredients that the original Chipolata’s contained.)

These sausages are well known all over the world so how on earth can there be any confusion at all?
Hummm.. all I have to do to produce  ingredient confusion here, is to tell people that I’m bringing Chipolata Cake or Chipolata Pudding to the family feast.

Ugh… a cake or pudding with sasuages in it? surely not! That doesn’t even begin to sound appetizing in any way shape or form.

(photo © kiwidutch)

Luckily one section of my family would not have batted an eyelid…  Why? because they know that fortunately there is a tastier explanation.
They know that the Chipolata Pudding and Chipolata Cake available in The Netherlands has absolutely nothing to do with sausages!
 
So, Chipolata Cake.. I kid you not !
 
In the Netherlands,  Chipolata Cake is a layered sponge with fruit and cream, topped with icing and available at many a Birthday Party.
It’s quite an old fashioned Dutch cake and comes in various shapes and sizes around the country, sometimes round, sometimes rectangular, it appears that some Bakeries have their own specialty decoration, ( but the inside layers and filling remain the same)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

Chipolata  Pudding is a very old and traditional pudding, again with fruit (raisins) and a creamy foamy texture.
Me. I like the cake and am not too fussed on the pudding, Himself on the other hand, likes the pudding better than the cake.

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

I have a copy of the recipe courtesy of a Baker’s Forum ( in the Dutch language only) and I’ve  “parked” the recipe here so that I can find it back if I want to make this later when I’m in New Zealand.  If anyone else would like to make it in the meantime, and needs it in english, please just post a comment and I’ll make a translation.

Chipolata Taart

Voor een lekkere chipolatavulling ga je uit van een stevige banketbakkersroom:
1/4 liter melk
2 eidooiers
50 gram suiker
25 gram bloem.
vannillesmaak.
De bloem met een klein deel van de melk,suiker,vanille en eidooiers roeren tot een glad papje en dit zachtjes en roerend gaar koken in de rest van de melk.
Laat deze room goed afkoelen en stuif er wat poedersuiker over(dit voorkomt een vel) deze bb room, liefst een dag tevoren maken.

Klop een 1/4 ltr.slagroom met 35gr.suiker luchtig en spatel deze door de even losgeroerde bb room en een scheut marasquinkikeur.

En spatel er dan stukjes in marasquin gedrenkte bitterkoekjes en wat rozijnen ook geweld in likeur.

Voor de kleur kun je er nog wat in stukjes gehakte geconfijte/gekleurde kersen(bigarreaux)door doen en wat gehakte sinassnippers.

Chipolata Cake

The basis for a nice chipolata filling is a stiff pastry custard (Confectioner’s custard /Crème pâtissière, or French pastry cream)
1/4 litre of milk
2 egg yolks
50 grams of sugar
25 grams of flour
vanilla essence
To make the Confectioner’s custard: Stir the flour with a little bit of the milk, sugar, vanilla and egg yolks until it is smooth and boil this while stirring on a low element while adding the rest of the milk.(stir constantly!)
Let the custard cool down and add a little bit of icing sugar (this prevents skin on the custard). It is recommended to make this pastry cream one day in advance.

Lightly beat 1/4 litre of cream together with 35 grams of sugar and mix it with the whipped custard and a dash of marasquin liquor. (“Liqueur de Marasquin” in French is Maraschino Liqueur, a dry liqueur. / but Marasquin cherry liqueur”, in English, is a sweet liqueur with a pronounced cherry taste made from cherry pits.)

Next ladle the pieces of bitter macaroons (bitterkoekjes = A bitter biscuit is a biscuit consisting of a mixture of ground bitter almonds, crystal sugar and protein.) drenched in marasquin and some raisins soaked in liquor.

Top cake with a thin layer of marzipan .

For a nice colour you could add some pieces of candied/coloured cherries (bigarreaux) and some cut orange peel.

(photo © kiwidutch)

So, next time someone mentions “Chipolata Cake” or Chipolata Pudding” .. or if you make one yourself, let yourself into a lovely Dutch secret and surprise people  who might find  that “sasuage” pudding might not be what they assumed  after all!

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