Local Heart, Global Soul

December 12, 2009

More Road Journey photos, Part 2…

There were too many photos from my last topic to post in one thread so this is Part 2….

More photos from on the road in Maine and Canada…

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

..some lovely building decoration…

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

I love the forest…

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

.. a storage shed that is like a little barn…

(photo © kiwidutch)

the wilderness is gorgeous…

(photo © kiwidutch)

A lovely drawing on historical Acadia…

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

Signs leading to Prince Edward Island…

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

..a postcard I bought shows the Confederation Bridge to PEI far better from the air than I could manage on the bridge itself…

(photo © kiwidutch)

December 11, 2009

Photographic muses of a journey by road…

Of course I took a lot of photos in Maine and during our travels into Canada… not all of them have made it neatly into my blog posts, but there are still some that I found funny, inspiring, beautiful, quirky or just plain interesting.

Often taken just quickly out of the window as we drove, here are a few…

(photo © kiwidutch)

Of course I am enamoured with the wide open spaces that we miss so much, living  as we do in the  densely populated province of South Holland in The Netherlands…

(photo © kiwidutch)

Nothing delighted us more than traveling on first the big highways, seeing so many trees… and so many more trees !

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

.. then to the smaller roads, …

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

…through bigger towns,

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

…though small towns.

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

…even to some very very small roads, that lost the bitumen and became gravel, but fortunately connected much later to a bigger road to our relief as we were afraid at one point that we were really heading into the middle of nowhere!

(photo © kiwidutch)

We looked out for moose, and I would have loved to see one,  good for them, but sadly for us they stayed away from the roads and I looked for naught…

(photo © kiwidutch)

.. and saw watertowers that reminded us a little of journey’s though the French countryside…

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

We practiced our linguistic skills, (or lack of them) with the aid of  some local road signs,…

(photo © kiwidutch)

We moved over for wide loads…

(photo © kiwidutch)

… and drooled over the wide open spaces… again,

(photo © kiwidutch)

..and again,

(photo © kiwidutch)

.. and again …

(photo © kiwidutch)

I played a sport  called ” let’s try and photograph a lighthouse sign”  this is only one that came even close !the other 99.9% of my efforts resulted in blurred imaged of forest greenery…

(photo © kiwidutch)

I loved the houses.. so very different in style to Dutch ones…

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

… and the Barns…. beautiful !

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

December 10, 2009

Crossing the border in St. Stephen and back though Maine…

We have been visiting the Ganong Chocolate factory and museum in St. Stephen, New Brunswick, Canada. Now it’s time to cross back into the United States again, so we approach the border on the Canadian side…

(photo © kiwidutch)

..and then across the bridge and  approach the American Customs point…

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

We are now back in Maine and our short visit to Canada is over. Wow, what a beautiful country we have just seen a little snippet of.. we have already decided that we would very much like to return to Canada if we can mange it next trip in the future.

The afternoon is wearing on and we have some serious kilometers still to cover until we are back at “Camp” on the lake.

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

The way back is filled with small towns, a few zillion trees and happy chocolate filled children in the back of the van.

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

Eventually darkness falls and we are treated to a beautiful Maine sunset…

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

December 8, 2009

Ganong Chocolate in St Stephens…

Filed under: CANADA,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , , , ,

(photo © kiwidutch)

We are in the Ganong Chocolate factory, doing the tour and learning all about chocolate making.

Don’t these look delectable?

Ha ! Gottcha, the chocolates in this photo aren’t in fact real, they are over-sized toy ones,  each just a little smaller than my computer mouse in size and there are two giant ” tray’s” of these side by side.

A photo above both the “trays”  showing how the real trays are packed, the game here is for two players to race each other and place their over-sized  “chocolates” into the over-sized “trays” to match the photo we are given… first to complete the arrangement correctly wins!  believe me it’s harder than it looks!

Here are some real chocolates, yes the fake ones are very realistic!

I think that the over-sized proportions are necessary, if they were sized realistically, many a child (and adult) would have mistakenly tried to eat them.

(photo © kiwidutch)

The Ganong factory has what is believed to be the oldest operating candy machine in the world. It is a lozenge machine that has produced lozenges since 1889 when it was installed on the third floor of this building. During a factory fire in 1903, two such machines crashed thought the floor and were badly damaged. Factory mechanics were able to salvage enough parts from the two to rebuild one machine, It us still going strong at the new Ganong plant and produces more than three million lozenges each week.

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

And then there are the “Chicken Bones” … err, “Chicken Bones?” for real? No… a sweet one, a candy one!

The original chicken bone was created at least 100 years ago by Baltimore native Frank Sparhawk. The exact year of it’s creation and it’s name are unknown, except that it is shaped like a chicken bone.

The chicken bone has an unsweetened dark chocolate centre, with a hardboiled sugar and cinnamon jacket. Today the chicken bone is still made the same way as it was over a century ago, only the length has changed. The Chicken Bone is the last remaining hard candy to be produced by Ganong.

(photo © kiwidutch)

We of course, stop in the shop to buy some chocolates to take with us…

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

This chocolate tour was a delectable stop indeed, it comes highly recommended by the Kiwidutch family and their friends! So if you are ever passing anywhere close to St Stephen in New Brunswick, Canada,  be sure to allow some time to take a break here in this most delicious of places.

(photo © kiwidutch)

December 7, 2009

St Stephens, and the delectable aroma of Chocolate…

Filed under: CANADA,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , , , ,

(photo © kiwidutch)

The children spy a playground as we travel though some small New Brunswick towns heading south… Sorry kids we are not stopping today, because we have an appointment to keep.
We want to stop somewhere famous in St. Stephens and we need to get there before the place closes for the day.. we will be cutting things a little fine as it is, so no unnecessary stopping until we get there, understand?
What are we aiming to see?

The famous Ganong Chocolate factory of course !

Phew, we arrive about an hour before closing time and the kids eyes light up when they see why we are stopping, their eyes light up even more (I hardly thought it possible but truly it IS) when they hear that in this chocolate factory and on this chocolate tour it’s free-all-you-can-eat chocolate tasting as you go!

(photo © kiwidutch)

The old factory at Ganong became too small for their present operational needs so they moved to a purpose built factory just outside town and so the original factory today houses a museum and shop… the museum gives the story of chocolate making from the cocoa bean until the finished product.

(photo © kiwidutch)

During the tour we learn that chocolate’s popularity increased in Europe during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. In the early 1800’s. Dutch and British experiments led to the creation of the solid chocolate we know today and by mid-century, chocolate manufacturing had taken hold in Europe and was beginning to spread in North America.

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

The Brothers Ganong made their start in 1873 and interestingly, many of the future famous players in the chocolate business, including Droste, Nestle, Lowney, Hershey and Moirs appeared about the same time.

Ganong’s famous hand dippers were women living in St. Stephen and surrounding areas, and the display tells us that ” a hand-dipper usually worked from seven in the morning until six at night, Monday to Saturday, spending much of that time up to her elbows in chocolate.

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

Working hours increased after Labour Day, when Christmas production began, when workers returned to the factory for another three hours in the evening. The mark of an experienced hand-dipper was her ability to put a mark or swirl of chocolate on the top of each chocolate. There was a distinctive swirl for each chocolate, and at one time Ganong made 150 different types of chocolate. ” (Wow, what long hours!)

(photo © kiwidutch)

We are having an excellent time and the kids are beside themselves with that most dreadful of choices ” What kind of chocolate will I try from the sample tray next?”

(photo © kiwidutch)

Since Dutch handmade chocolates are made from the best-on-the-planet-chocolate produced by our neighbour Belgium, it can be hard to find chocolate in other countries that compares in any way favourably to what we have at home. I was disappointed with the Anne of Green Gables chocolate as it was clearly inferior , but WOW the Ganong chocolate is VERY GOOD indeed, and is up there with Europe’s finest.

(photo © kiwidutch)

This is a very welcome surprise because we have tasted the “Hershey” brand of chocolate whilst in America and to be honest I was very worried indeed that this place was going to be a Canadian equivalent of cheap mass produced lower quality chocolate. I needn’t have worried, Ganong is leagues above Hershey!
We looove learning all about chocolate here ! Let’s take a look around…

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

December 6, 2009

Sawmill Creek .. a Bridge under cover.

Filed under: CANADA,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , , ,

(photo © kiwidutch)

We are traveling down the coast  of the Bay of Fundy, and stop at Sawmill Creek Bridge.

It’s a beautiful covered bridge and we wanted to take a closer look…
In October 1869 the Saxby Gale was a powerful storm in which the combined force of wind and high tides destroyed homes and killed people and cattle all along the Bay of Fundy.

In that storm the bridge over Sawmill Creek Fell apart.

Rebuilt as a covered bridge, it was for years,part of the highway.

The current covered bridge was constructed in 1905. When a concrete bridge was planned to replace it in 1975, Albert County Heritage Trust, a newly formed organization persuaded the government not to demolish the covered bridge.

It was the Trust’s first of many projects to save historic structures.

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

… and No, I have no clue why there’s a fine if you don’t walk your horse!

(photo © kiwidutch)

December 5, 2009

Restaurant Review: Broadleaf Guest Ranch and Restaurant

(photo © kiwidutch)

We have spent the morning walking around Hopewell Rocks, and enjoying a glorious day outside. Now it’s lunchtime and we are heading south via the Fundy Coastal Drive.

After a while it’s inevitable that the fresh air and exercise has an effect,  and conversation in the van turns to lunch. We keep a look-out for a diner or family establishment that have been our favourites so far.

This is how we came to stop at The Broadleaf Guest Ranch and Restaurant.

One thing is clear when we arrive: this Farm /Ranch has been very busy to make the most of what it has..  space and beautiful location, it has diversified to be a number of different things in the one place and also appears to serve the local community well, since the far end of the restaurant appeared to be getting ready to cater for a wedding when we  were there.

There is  guest accommodation available and  restaurant, but inside the restaurant there is also a gift/souvineer area, outside there are canoes, a covered wagon, picnic area and  horse riding, so it’s clear that there is a lot going on here at the Ranch.

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

It looks like a great place for an outdoor holiday.

Inside the Restaurant there are big couches by a fireplace that would be especially welcoming in the winter months, a play area with rocking horses and stuffed toys, so the kids can be kept amused until the food arrives.

(photo © kiwidutch)

Once again we are treated to some good home style cooking, and while  it is not haute cuisine, it is honest food at a reasonable price. Good Family fare, crowd pleasing food. The kids tuck in and enjoy their meals.

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

Although this is not the kind of food we would like to have every day, we enjoy ours too.

The sun is shining and while the kids are letting off a little steam running around outside, I take a little walk around to take some photos.

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

December 4, 2009

Hopewell Rocks, having fun with the camera!

(photo © kiwidutch)

We have stopped at the Hopewell Rocks in New Brunswick on our way back to Maine.

The kids are having a wonderful time on the beach, looking at the rock formations, weird pebbles, small rocks piled up artfully,  crabs and a multitude of thing in and around the waters edge.

We all take a heap of photos, and generally get inspired by our surroundings.

The weather is lovely and we are all loving the walking.   Eventually my asthma gets the better of me and  I get a bit wheezy  after walking a bit further than I intended  and Mr. Four’s little legs are starting to suffer from weariness so it’s nice to see that there is a trolley at  the end of the loop walk where the two of us can catch a lift back.

We leave the fitter members of our party to do the full loop, Mr Four and I take the motorized way back to the information centre, where we amuse ourselves in the outdoor playground until the others catch up.

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © elmotoo)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

This is an excellent place to have visited… everyone is very pleased that we stopped here.

December 3, 2009

Hopewell Rocks and some very large “Flower Pots” indeed!

(photo © kiwidutch)

Today we start heading  back to Maine. We want  visit the Hopewell Rocks the way as we have heard that the walks  are lovely and rock formations are well worth seeing.  Some of the rocks are called ” flower pots”,… Flower pots? Humm, sounds interesting … we pack everything into the van and set out…

The flowerpot  rocks we want to see are situated near the very top of the Bay of Fundy, where  the tides there are amongst the biggest in the world.

Imagine 100 billion tons of water moving in and out of a bay twice every 25 hours. Powered by the gravitational pull of the moon and the sun.  The gravitational pull of the sun during the new and full moon phases is stronger then usual and and results in higher than normal or ‘Spring: tides.

When the moon is at right angles to the line between the earth and the sun, the gravitational pull is weaker, resulting in lower then normal or “neap” tides.

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

Why does the tide come in so high? Because the Bay of Fundy is funnel-shaped, wide and deep at one end and shallow at te other, tides are pushed increasingly higher as they move up the bay. By the time they reach “ the rocks” the tides are over four stories high.

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

Although the flowerpot rocks come in a variety of different shapes and sizes, they have all been formed over millions of years by the dynamic movements of the earth and erosion from glaciers, tides, snow, ice and winds.

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

The story of the rocks began approximately 300 million years ago when fast-flowing streams deposited thick layers of and and gravel at Hopewell Cape from the nearby Caledonia Mountains.

(photo © kiwidutch)

Over time the sand and gravel compacted into layers of conglomerate rock and sandstone. Forces within the earth thrust and titled the rock layers, creating large, vertical and horizontal fractures. From this point of the flowerpots began to evolve into their unique shapes.

(photo © kiwidutch)

How long will they stand? As the upper surfaces of the flowerpots become weakened in the spring due to moisture, pieces slide down the cliffs. Larger flowerpot rocks may stand for thousands of years, other hundreds, depending on how much they become unbalanced though erosion.

Geologists say there is enough conglomerate rock to make these amazing pillars for the next 100,000 years!

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

The midges attack us in the forest, but the beach walk is lovely and we have fun looking at odd looking rocks, piles of pebbles and puddles in the rocky  muddy flats… we like Hopewell Rocks!

(photo © elmotoo)

(photo © kiwidutch)

December 2, 2009

Restaurant Review: Sandpiper Restaurant, Port Philip, Nova Scotia.

(photo © kiwidutch)

We are in Port Philip, Nova Scotia,  Canada, and are returning to a restaurant that we saw earlier in the afternoon before we got distracted by the beach.

Last time we saw this place we looked in amazement because there was a long queue of people  lined up out the door, the car park was full to bursting and clearly this place was hot to trot  on the scale of popular local dining.

Now, almost two hours later, we pull in to the carpark to try our luck. Luckily the rush is mostly over and they have a table for us no problem. The kids have worked up an appetite and we sit down in anticipation. This establishment is well known  in the area.

We amuse ourselves with some very novel place-mats that depict clippings of old newspaper stories whilst we wait for our orders to arrive.

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

Our food arrives… once again we have found an excellent family business, the menu is not terribly extensive, but it doesn’t need to be, what these folks  cook, they cook well.

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

Everyone enjoys their main meal and then we approach the subject of dessert.

We ask and apparently the Pie is highly recommended. We ask what flavours and I knew my choice as soon as the words  “Lemon Merange”  were uttered… I think that coconut creme was also mentioned, but I was in such a delirium about the possibilities of Lemon Merange  that I might not have remembered that correctly…

(photo © kiwidutch)

The lemon Merangue was simply delectable…

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

We have had a wonderful meal… replete, happy and tired we end an amazing day.

(photo © kiwidutch)

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