Local Heart, Global Soul

August 29, 2018

Ngāi Tahu And Their Little Known Conversion…

There are quite a few information boards in Christchurch’s Cathedral Square and they make very informative reading. even though I grew up in Christchurch and know a lot about the city and it’s history, there is still so much to discover, so much to learn. One of these boards informs me:

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Ngāi Tahu in the Anglican City”. “Christchurch Cathedral and Cathedral Square are iconic symbols of Ōtautahi / Christchurch and important reminders of its Church of England roots. Few people realise that the first Anglican church in greater Christchurch was a Ngāi Tahu “whare karakia” (church) and that several early Anglican churches in the Province were built by and for Ngāi Tahu communities.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(Above)“Ngai Tahu were early converts to the Anglican faith in Ōtautahi in a period when politics and religion were integrally tied. Hakopa Te Ata o Tū (3rd from left) and Pita Te Hori (3rd from right) were Ngāi Tahu Rangatira, members of the Anglican Church and key players in the early relationships between Ngāi Tahu and the leaders of the burgeoning colonial city.”

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“Holy Trinity Church at Wairewa Pa, Little River was the realisation of a dream for Irai Tihau who did much to secure its construction. Builot in 1870, the church stood on a small spur above the pa. Holy Trinity Church was destroyed by fire in 1969“

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“When the foundation stone for the Te Whare Tipene / St Stephen’s, Tuahiwi was laid by Sir George Grey, Governor of New Zealand in 1867, Ngāi Tahu took the opportunity to express their concerns over land sales to the crown. While many Ngāi Tahu remained committed to the Church through the turbulent colonial period, others became disillusioned, regarding it as complicit in the injustices wrought by the government in the loss of their lands and resources.”

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“The original raupō and slab whare karakai (church) built at Puari in Koukourārata / Port Levy in 1844 was the first Anglican church in what was to become the Canterbury province. It was replaced in 1864 by the more substantial wooden building pictured here. A memorial marks the site today.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Ngāi Tahu” is pronounced “nigh-tar-hu” means the ‘people of Tahu’, linking back to ancestor Tahu Pōtiki. Within the iwi (tribes) there are five primary hapū (groups) being Kāti Kurī, Ngāti Irakehu, Kāti Huirapa, Ngāi Tūāhuriri and Ngāi Te Ruahikihiki.

August 7, 2018

The Restoration Of The Trinity…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I did a great deal of my growing up in Christchurch New Zealand. As anyone in any place, rural or city will know, you become familiar with some buildings not just because you personally use them, but because they are landmarks. They are just “there”.

In my early 20’s I had a flat in one part of the central city and a job on the other side of the central city.
I preferred walking to cycling so would take various walking routes to work, one of which this part of Manchester Street and thus often walked past what was always known to me as the “Trinity Church”. I vaguely knew it was no longer a church, but in my mind, and I think in the minds of many others it still was and we always referred to it as such.

As soon as the News spread of the devastating Christchurch earthquakes I know that historic buildings like these would be hit hard. Fortunately, although the damage is significant, this beautiful building is being restored to it’s former glory.
There have had to be some concessions however: for instance: in place of layers of heavy stone blocks to make the tower, there is now a thin veneer of stone, a lighter and safer alternative to make the building future quake proof. There is an information panel on the plastic sheeting screening and separating the site from the public footpath and street area.

The first half reads:

Former Trinity Congregational Church. Architect: Benjamin Woolfield Mountfort (1825-1898). Opened: 17 January 1875. The site cost £ 500 and the building £ 5000. The church is to be restored and a replica tower constructed where the original was destroyed. The basis of the style is early French Gothic, a revival of church architecture of the late 12th and 13th centuries. It was an innovative and challenging design and the first New Zealand example of the style in stone.

Of particular interest is the combination of timber and stone in the interior of the church. In 1974 the church was threatened with demolition but saved as a community theatre until it changed hands again in 1993.
The church then became a popular wedding blessing venue followed by the Octagon restaurant until the building was badly damaged by the Canterbury earthquakes of 2010-2011. Once again it was threatened with demolition until Christchurch Heritage Limited purchased the building in 2013. Heritage Status: Category 1 – Heritage New Zealand, Group 1 – Christchurch City Council District Plan. “

For some reason my computer is refusing to let me rotate quite a few photographs so warning: this post may involve a little head turning. My apologies. The text on the right hand side of the sheet just gives an ownership list of the building, I haven’t typed that out separately. Once again I am seeing buildings in a particular stage of their lives. By the time we next visit, it will probably be complete, or at least nearing completion and it will be interesting to see what function the building will have. For me, with old bricks or thin veneer, this will always be: Trinity Church.

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February 27, 2015

Katharinenkirche: Through The Doors Of Detail…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

When we visited Frankfurt am Main in 2013, we stumbled on the fact the that the Frankfurt Marathon was on during one of the days of our stay only by the fact that we happened to be in the centre of the city at the time it was on.

Yesterday I made a blog post about the Hauptwache (guardhouse), but that’s not the only amazing building in this location because literally just steps away on the opposite side of the … we can find an amazing church: “Katharinenkirche” (St. Catherine’s Church)

Wikipedia  (link at bottom of the post) tells me that: ” Katharinenkirche is the largest Lutheran church in Frankfurt am Main, dedicated to the martyred early Christian saint, Catherine of Alexandria.

It is located in the old city centre near one of the most famous plazas in the city, the Hauptwache (Main Guard).

The current church building, built between 1678 and 1681 replaced the Ss. Catherine’s and Barbara Chapel from the late 14th century.  

With the adoption of the Lutheran Reformation by the Free Imperial City of Frankfurt in 1533 the city unilaterally appropriated all religious buildings within its old city centre.

This status was statutorily fixed in 1830 by the deeds of dotation, which is why St. Catherine’s is one of the city’s dotation churches left for eternal usage by a Lutheran congregation.

The German writer, artist, and politician Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749–1832) was baptized in this church in 1749.

This church is built in the baroque style and stands 54 meters in height. St. Catherine’s was destroyed in 1944 by the Allied bombing of Frankfurt am Main during the Second World War. The city reconstructed its church between 1950 and 1954. “

As with yesterday’s post, it’s hard to get photographs because of the barriers put up for the Frankfurt Marathon, but I do my best…

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Catherine%27s_Church,_Frankfurt

 

September 4, 2014

Fresh Air Stops: Serious And Stunning Detractions…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Looking  around you when you are are on  the road often brings you the reward of stunning views, quirky discoveries and the case of the winding roads in Greece, nice stops for a breath of fresh air next to beautiful places as relief from motion sickness.

We visited the Pelion peninsular in Greece in October of 2012 and in some places the leaves on trees were already turning russet colours.

One of our fresh-air stops was by a little shrine by the roadside high up a hill,  at first I thought they were demonstrations of Catholic faith but then I noticed that whilst most of these have either the figure of Jesus or the Virgin Mary inside the little box, this one seems to be specific to the man who’s photograph is on the side.

I suspect that  he was the victim of a road accident here and that is the memorial to him in the spot where he lost his life. I’m now wondering if the other markers with the Virgin Mary’s are also markers of road fatalities? I know that in New Zealand they used to mark fatality spots with white crosses, but removed them when eventually it was found that drivers got distracted by the sight of them, especially when there were a lot in on one corner and they were often the cause of more accidents. Instead, roads signs were added saying things like “dangerous curve ahead”.

Another of our fresh-air stops took in the views of a beautiful little church just off the main road and during the rest of our time on the road we also passed rows of beehives, and magnificent views both along the coast and towards other islands across the sea. Once again sometimes the roads were ridiculously narrow,  so when we were getting closer to our holiday home in Platania, we made sure that we took advantage of another stop that had come highly recommended…

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August 29, 2014

Stepping Into Old And New, There’s More Here Than Meets The Eye…

Filed under: GREECE,Kissos - Church,PELION PENINSULAR,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I’m stepping inside the church in the village of Kissos, on the Pelion peninsular in Greece.

Even though it was the last week of October back in 2012, the day was sunny and very warm. On the outside of the building down each of the long sides runs a very deep veranda, formed by a low roof.

The main effect of this is that the inside of the church is cool, dark and almost gloomy in places. Small windows let in strong light in areas, but in general, once stepping inside I was forced to pause and let my eyes adjust to the dimness of the light.

The church is packed with detail, you almost don’t know where to look first,  but two things catch your attention first: the extensive renovation under way evidenced by the scaffolding and internal bracing within the church that allow viewpoints from certain angles but not from others, and the strange mixture of very old and very new, best evidenced by the brilliantly coloured modern stained glass in the doors though which I entered, and the icons that would be seen close by, probably newer than they first appeared but with ancient influences.

Once my eyes adjust to the gloom, I start to become aware that there is far far more to this place than first meets the eye…

 

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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August 3, 2014

Stopping At Church For A Breather: Milina Without The Rain…

Filed under: Agia Kiriaki,GREECE,PELION PENINSULAR,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Now that we’ve navigated the narrow streets of Agia Kiriaki we are more than ready to get back to Platania.

But the winding road we had to contend with on the way to the end of the Pelion Peninsular also had to be contended with on the way back, so by the time we got  to Milina I was desperate for a stop.

The first time we passed through here it was raining  rather hard but now the rain has passed so it’s a good place to take a breather.

If you’ve never suffered from motion sickness you will find it difficult to understand the relief that stopping moving brings, the chance to get some fresh air and feel like you are on terra firma again.

A good ten minute break does wonders, and if you can take your mind off feeling seedy then all the better. I usually do this my focusing on talking  few photographs and since this church at Milina was rather photogenic it became the focus of my attention. On the ground at the front of  the church I found a pebble mosaic of a double headed eagle and crown,  Byzantine empire symbols still used by the Greek Orthodox Church. I could have gotten a better photograph if I could have climbed onto the  wall next to it, but on crutches that was both a physical impossibility and a dumb idea so common sense prevailed and I did my best from ground level.

The church has two towers at the front and a tiled dome in the centre with white stone and red brick pattern detailing that sets off the grey stonework perfectly.  After taking photographs of it, I cross the street and stand at the waters edge, the sun is starting to set and way above us on top of the hill another village is bathed in the last rays of the late afternoon light. All too soon it’s time to hit the road again… back to Platania and a good rest. After my longer than anticipated walk to the monastery earlier I won’t be doing much for the next days.

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May 21, 2014

Zooming In … To Church…

Following yesterday’s post about St. Nicolas Church in La Roche-en-Ardenne, Belgium, I am again obsessed by detail. Here’s a photographic post that’s all about the close-ups…

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May 20, 2014

This One Has Aged Well, Or Has It?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

La Roche-en-Ardenne in Belgium has a castle on a hill in the centre of the town, it’s an imposing landmark and as soon as you negotiate the steep path upwards you quickly get an amazing view out above the town.

I was here on my own during the summer of 2012, whilst Himself and the kids were out on the river canoeing with a friend and his daughter.

Below me, on one side of the castle is a large church and my elevated position gives me an excellent view of this amazing building.

Some research on the web (link below)  tells me that this is:

St Nicholas’ Church,  Located close to the mediaeval castle, the church was built in the early years of the twentieth century in the Neo-Gothic style, to reflect the Church Triumphant during the Catholic Revival.Today, the church hosts concerts, exhibitions and other cultural events and holds a collection of artefacts linked to local history.” Ok, so the church isn’t as old as it looks, but it’s still imposing… Let’s take a look…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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http://www.belgiumtheplaceto.be/roche_religious_heritage.php

March 13, 2014

Not A Cathedral, But If It Was Up To Me I’d Make It One…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

What do you do when a friend travels halfway around the world to visit you in The Netherlands?

Well, if you are Family Kiwidutch, you bundle her in to a hired van less than twelve hours after she arrives and take her on a whistle-stop tour of as many European countries and experiences as you can squeeze in.

We zoomed through Belgium and France so that we could take the channel tunnel to England, then back to Belgium where we showed her the fabulous town of Bruges, then followed beneath the Belgium border in France to document a few of the more than sixty amazing fortified churches.

They are not well known but deserve to be.

Once we reached the area beneath Luxembourg we turned left and headed north for pretty much the entire length of the country, taking in several castles and the sights along the way, followed by a strange day of not knowing if we were in Belgium or Germany because the national border zigzagged more than the road we were on.

Following a childhood memory from Himself we went with delight into Monschau and after lunch and a soaking we literally and metaphorically found we had bitten off more than we could chew and high-tailed it out of there because it was rather too touristic for comfort.

Instead we invaded the unassuming German town of Aldenhoven where our lodgings took us back  several decades and the next morning  when we crossed back into the Netherlands  we finally got around to showing Velvetine our “own back yard” (That’s metaphorical of course because we live in an apartment and don’t actually own a back yard).

Between seeing Escher, the Hagues annual summer sculpture exhibition, a commercial seeding exporter and Zaans Schans we are now in Delft… and as usual there is plenty to see. (We keep telling Velvetine that she can catch up on sleep on the fourteen hour plane journey back to Singapore).

I mentioned in yesterday’s post that whenever I think of Delft that the image of the Stadhuis (City Hall)  in it’s main square immediately springs to mind, but the Stadhuis has competition when it comes to being the most imposing building on the Square. The two buildings face one another at opposite ends like opposing giants, and when I saw the opposition for the first time I thought it was a Cathedral.

But Cathedral it is not: this is “Niewe Kerk” (New Church) with is the Protestant church in the centre of Delft most famous for being the second highest tower in the Netherlands (only the Domtoren in Utrecht is higher) and for being the last resting place for the House of Orange-Nassau’s: the Dutch royal family, starting with William the Silent in 1584 and more recently Queen Juliana and later her husband Prince Bernhard in 2004.

It’s possible to climb to the top of the tower but my crutches and I decided that that would be one adventure too far  for good sense  so you will have to make do with photographs of the entrance door and the tower as a whole from afar. It might be NieuweKerk but I still  think it should be a Cathedral.

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March 10, 2014

Checking Out The Less Wobbly Bits…

Filed under: DELFT,Historical,PHOTOGRAPHY,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The Dutch version of  the Leaning Tower is the “Oude Kerk” (Old Church) in Delft.

It leans almost two metres off centre and has been the subject of many a wary eye of person as they pass by.

So far the seventy-five metre tower has stood without problem since the 1300’s and since the lean stays the same over the centuries it will probably stay in it’s leaning state for many centuries more.

Of course it’s not just the tower that makes the church, the knave and the apse is naturally there too… so this post details the “rest” of this beautiful gothic church.

The church’s website tells us:  “The first stained glass window was installed in the Old Church in 1406, and more were added in the same century.

But the city fire of 1536 and the Delft Thunderclap of 1654 (a gunpowder explosion) unfortunately destroyed them all.

Plain glass replaced the originals, and it was not until the 20th century that new stained glass windows were installed, one by one.

The church now features 27 of them, each telling their own story. This distinctive collection is regarded as the crowning achievement of the renowned glazier Joep Nicolas.

The windows of the Old Church are extremely colourful, featuring ochre yellows, heavenly blues, deep reds and dark greens. Most of them depict Biblical stories, such as the Parable of the Prodigal Son, and the story of baby Moses.

But there are also a number of interesting memorial windows, such as the Liberation window and the Wilhelmina window.”

I haven’t managed to go inside the church to see the windows yet, but can at least admire the architcture. It’s on my “to do” list to come back one day and admire the treasures on the inside,  and that this “church on a lean” will still be it’s usual wobbly self when I return.  For now I am content to concentrate on the outside and to enjoy the intricate combinations of stonework, brick and windows.

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