Local Heart, Global Soul

February 20, 2017

A Battery That Depicts A Nation At War…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

My next post from Texel’s Air Force and War museum is all about the remains and former parts of the defensive batteries that were built around the region during World War II.

There are two main information boards that go with a series of quite amazing models, made by a “B. van Leersum” they show all of the defenses as they would have been in 1940.

If I am totally honest I am curious about the models but less knowledgeable about the technical details that go with them, so I have written up the information that went with the display, and will leave my dear readers to hopefully make better sense of it than I did.

The North Battery
This was called by the Germans the “Marine Battery Eierland”, “Nordbatterie” or “Batterie Texl-Nord”   and was located near Marker Pole No. 28. 

The battery was operational as early as 1940 and was used to fire on the channel between Texel and Vlieland. The weaponry consisted of three 15cm cannon, originating from the former Dutch coast battery of Den Hoorn.

On the outer dunes, three open firing positions were built for it. Later on in the war this battery formed part of the Atlantic Wall.  Four more advanced 10.5 cm cannon and concrete bunkers were also installed together with a command post bunker with aiming equipment.

In the dunes behind these bunkers there were a number of smaller bunkers, among others for ammunition storage and to house soldiers etc.
After the war the bunkers suffered from coastal erosion and some even fell onto the beach. They were a risk for coastal sea defenses, so they were demolished,  and therefore why there is not much left today.
This model shows the situation of 1944 with the three foundations of the 15 cm weapons, the four cannon bunkers with the 10.5cm cannon and the command post bunkers.’

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

” Coast Battery Den Hoorn
This Dutch battery of  3 x 15L35  was constructed 1938-39 in the dunes near the village of Den Hoorn but was part of the “position of Den Helder” which formed a defense around Den Helder to protect the strategically important navy post and the Texel channel.

This battery consisted of the following constructions: Command Post, three firing positions which were also used as ammunition storage, an ammunition lift, a waiting room for soldiers, staff accommodation, three measuring posts and a workroom.
This battery was made for indirect firing so that the cannon did not have to be positioned on the outer dunes. From the command post and the three measuring posts, the distance and the direction of the target were defined.

This information was passed on to the workroom  where with the help of a type of mechanical computer, the data was transformed into aiming information for the soldiers manning the cannon.

German occupiers repositioned the cannon as early as 1940 to the north battery, the command bunker was still used for observation. The command post on the Loodsmansduin, the  three firing positions in the nature reserve de Bollenkamer  and the southern measuring post near  beach post number 8 in the inner dunes are still present.

This model shows the parts of the battery that are mentioned.”

The Second World War was very far away from my family in New Zealand, and yet uncomfortably close for my Dutch family members. Looking at things like this helps me to try and make sense of the things that they went through, what occupation of their country was like and how the experiences of those times shaped and changed a nation.  It’s a sobering time in Dutch history, a catastrophic time in world history … where the battery didn’t just apply to these structures being built, but also to the battery that the country was taking.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 19, 2017

Georgian Knights Of Old And Tales Of Chivalry…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

One of the next exhibits that we see in the Air Force and War Museum on Texel is an unexpected but beautiful set of Georgian artifacts.

The information next to it tells us:
“Beginning May 1999 the head of the Georgian Orthodox church,  Ilja II, visited Texel.

On 3rd May he paid a visit to the museum to view the exhibit devoted to the “Georgian uprising”.

As a gift he brought with him an oil painting and a special book. The painting  shows the “old Tbilisi”, the capital of Georgia, and the book describes part of the Georgian church history.

The gold plaque in the center of the exhibition depicts a knight in a panther skin, and another information board tells us that this is part of one of Georgia’s Epic Stories :

“In the epic story Rustaveli talks about matters such as love, chivalry, courage and friendship.

Although the epic story is written in Georian, the heroes come from other countries: Arabia, India and China.

The knight in the Panther Skin tells the story of the arabian  nobelman Avtandil who is sent by his lover and also the ruler of arabia Tinatin, to find the mysterious knight in the panther skin.

After searching for three years Avtandil finds the knight who happens to be the indian prince Tariel and they become friends.

Tariel tells Avtandil that his lover Nestan-Daredjan is kept prisoner by devils / evil spirits in a fort. There is a passionate quest to find Daredjan and to free her.

At the end of the story there is a double wedding: the Royal wedding of Tariel and Nestan-Darejan, and that of Avtandil and Queen Tinatin.”

This is an unexpected find about the Georgian country and culture and tells us something interesting and fun that I would otherwise have had very little chance of coming across since Georgia is not in the mainstream media very much. The detail fanatic in me is also delighted by the gold-work in the picture… and added to this, who doesn’t enjoy a good story?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 18, 2017

A Mine Of Unexpected Information…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Himself and I, visiting the Air Force and War Museum on Texel back in the Easter of 2016, learned more and more about the regions wartime history with every step around the museum.

Several display boards filled with photographs tell us all about the deportation of younger men, in order to work under the occupying forces.

The text reads: “Beginning in November 1944, every male on Texel between the ages of 17 and 40 had to report to the former “zeevaartschool” (marine academy). On the 11th November, 806 men left the island in two groups.

The first group had to walk from Den Helder, via Hyppolytushoef, via the Afsluitdijk to Witmarsum, where they could sleep before walking to Leeuwarden.

The second group went by the ferry boat “Mars diep” to Harlingen and then also walked to Leeuwarden. Both groups had to deal with storm, cold, rain and snow.

At the Leeuwarden train station both groups were put onto a train to Assen. Here, they were housed in different buildings, including the Meester de Visserschool and the Agricultural school and at the “Port Natal” estate.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The men had to work for the German “Organisation Todt” in strengthening the so-called “Westwall”. This was one of the many lines of defense raised by the Germans as a response to the advancing allies.

Eventually all men returned safely back to the island.”
There are so many exhibits here that it would be impossible to give you a close up of all the photographs or a English text of them all… needless to say we both learned a massive amount and could not recommend a visit highly enough to anyone interested in history and local events.

We also learned to our complete surprise: “British-Indian troops arrived on Texel in the Spring of 1943 as Second Battalion of the 950e Infantry Regiment (II./ind.I.R.950).

They were taken prisoner in North Africa and later joined the German army.  The Battalion was used on Texel in coastal defense (the “Atlantic Wall”).

Because the Germans had doubts about the effectiveness of the Indian troops during the Dutch winter, they were replaced in the autumn by part of the  803 North-Caucasian Infantry Battalion.

The Sikhs in the regiment were allowed to wear a turban, as can be seen in some of the photos. The used it to keep their hair bound up, as they were not allowed to cut it off due to their religion.” Details like this are not generally known outside of local war records. We continue to discover so many new things…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 17, 2017

A Relaxed Posting, If Only There Hadn’t Been A War On…

Himself and I are at Texel’s Air Force and War Museum. The island was of course subject to the German occupation during World War II along with the rest of the country. That said, little fighting was seen here so it was a rather relaxed posting for the occupying forces, something reflected in these photographs. This part of the exhibition covers some of the time during the second world war, it’s a very different view when compared to other exhibitions I have seen, for instance of bombed out areas of  Rotterdam and parts of The Hague. It’s also a very different view to what my father experienced as a child living in The Hague. Let’s take a look…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 16, 2017

A Room Full Of Radio’s And The Electronics Of Their Day…

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY,TEXEL,Texel: Air Force And War Museum,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: ,
(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The Airforce and War Museum on Texel is a place that makes a good impression on the visitor as soon as they walk in the door.

Himself had the same feeling as I did on this, he knew instantly that he was going to enjoy himself here too.

One of the first rooms close to the entrance contains a lot of radios, gramophones and record players.

The sign on one of the radios says  “Dit is de eerste T.V die op Texel  geplaatste is door de f.a. Jan Achter in 1953” which translates as ” This is the first T.V. to be installed on Texel in 1953 via the firm Jan Achter “.

Radio’s were confiscated by the occupying German forces during World War Two, of course some were hidden by the local population in order to aid the resistance, a perilous action since punishments could range up to the death penalty if the hidden sets were discovered. The gramophones and record players in the room are all vintage models, many from earlier in the twentieth century. It’s a curious insight into not only the technology of the day but also into what was once the height of “modern entertainment” and how far technology has progressed in such a short time. Himself still has a substantial record collection, and of course a record player on which to play his records, I have to admit that the gramophones are my favourites, I love their old style charm.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 15, 2017

A Not So Flying Visit To The Air Force And War Museum…

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY,Texel: Air Force And War Museum,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: ,
(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Back on Good Friday last year, Family Kiwidutch were on the island of Texel.

After dropping friends and kids at the Ecomare nature museum, we make our way to the Airforce and War Museum.

There is an old helicopter standing on the grass  by the main road, which is the thing that first caught our attention to the existence of this place.

Little Mr saw it first and was very excited, but the idea of touring an entire museum didn’t quite captivate him quite as much, also none of the other kids were interested in coming here, so maybe the prospect of being the odd one out of the (kid) group also influenced his choice.

When you arrive you drive into a car park shared by other businesses so the main entrance is not instantly identifiable, but a helpful sign on the side of the large building tells us that the main entrance is actually around the back, accessible via a short drive way. It also backs on to the local airfield, a nice, and rather fitting, coincidence.

Before we go inside I take photographs of the large propeller outside, also the double Daimler Benz DB-601A engines that the accompanying sign tells us once sat in and powered a Messerschmitt Me Bf-110C. Inside to the right is a small cafe area, even the coin operated toddler ride is in the form of a little plane. It only takes a minute inside to tell us that this place is going to be fun…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 14, 2017

The Kids Choose Seals And Sea Creatures Over Our Plans…

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY,TEXEL,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: ,
(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

On Good Friday of the Easter Weekend 2016, family Kiwidutch woke up in our accommodation on the island of Texel to a cool but beautiful day.

The temperature was due to rise substantially during the morning so we were very lucky with the weather.

We have one friend and her daughter staying with us and our other friends are in separate accommodation.

Himself and I have an idea of a museum we would really like to see today, but realise that it’s not something that the kids will necessarily find interesting.

There is a place close by called Ecomare, which we read is a nature museum, seal sanctuary, sea aquarium and a bird sanctuary.

All of the kids vote to go to Ecomare rather than to the museum, so we dropped off the friends staying with us and the others followed in their vehicle.

Himself and I are delighted to have a little bit of time to ourselves, no being rushed on by kids, bored on the sidelines. We wave off everyone else and turn the car around to spend some time somewhere very different…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 13, 2017

There Seems To Be Very Little House And Rather A Lot Of Roof…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Back in 2016, Family Kiwidutch started their Easter long weekend on the island of Texel.

One unusual thing that we quickly realised was unusual to us, was the shape of the houses.

To put it bluntly, there appeared to be very little house and an awful lot of roof.

In some instances, as we travelled around during the weekend and I took photographs from the passenger seat of the car, it was like we were looking at some sort of structure in the distance that was like a roof placed on the ground.

When we got closer we would start to see the house appear underneath, but the buildings still look rather strange.

Some of these houses were farm houses attached to their barn in the traditional style of centuries past, other barns were in duplicate style of the houses but separate from them.

Perhaps the exposed landscape on the island necessitates this style of building,  it is certainly very different to the house styles we have seen in all the other parts of the Netherlands we have ben to so far.  I find myself wondering how the upper space of these houses is used, in most instances there seems to be just one small window, but that said the room up there can’t be large, so maybe one window is enough. On the upside, from high up in the roof space, the view from these windows must be rather special.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 12, 2017

Getting Settled And Sorted In Our Respective Accommodations…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Last year,  on the Thursday before Easter, we find ourselves in the island of Texel and in the process of looking for our accommodation.

The place we will be staying is a rented house in a holiday park called “De Krim”.

The place that we have rented is a small, two story house: there is one downstairs bedroom with a double bed for Himself so I take photographs of the downstairs area, inside and out.

However, because of my foot injury I don’t want to have to go upstairs so Little Mr commandeers my camera and takes the honours.

Due to us arriving later in the day, and the variation in the weather during the our stay, these photographs were taken over the entire weekend.

The house is compact but plenty big enough for our needs.

The house that our friends hired is smaller, it’s actually more a static caravan. The area of their place is less than half the size of our accommodation, but they will be over at our place quite a bit, or out and about, so the size of the sleeping area is less important.

Their baby and almost four year old are more impressed with the playground for tots, so everyone is happy there.  Little Mr is pleased with the garden space at the back of our place, he and Himself had a kick-a-round with a football we have bought with us.  The house has plenty of space for everyone, perfect!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Little Mr.)

(photograph © Little Mr.)

(photograph © Little Mr.)

(photograph © Little Mr.)

(photograph © Kiwidutch.)

(photograph © Kiwidutch.)

(photograph © Little Mr.)

(photograph © Little Mr.)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 11, 2017

A First Glimpse As We Look For Our Accommodation…

Arriving on the Dutch island of Texel just before the 2016 Easter weekend, we check out the map: our accomodation is near the far end of the island.  Texel is flatter than I imagined: flat paddocks in the centre of a dune /dyke rimmed perimiter that keep the waves of the North Sea at bay.  It’s interesting to get a first glimpse, there will be better chances to see the island in detail during the weekend of course, but for now we are intent on finding our accomodation and settling in.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Next Page »

Blog at WordPress.com.