Local Heart, Global Soul

January 3, 2019

“Leafing” In The Detail…

Filed under: ART,My Reference Library,PHOTOGRAPHY,THE NETHERLANDS,ZIERIKZEE — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Back during the Easter break of 2017, Himself dropped me off in the Zierikzee city centre in the early morning for a look around.

Since getting up and about to get ready was already an effort, the first thing I did was to sit down and have a little rest.

A leaf on the cobbled street caught my attention and I engaged on a mission to try and get as much detail of it as I could. I was not just interested in the leaf, but also the bricks of the street, the tiny plants between them, the leaf litter and the shape and shadows of the gaps between them.

I was also interested in the character of the bricks, the chips, the parts that had been worn smooth, the different colours brought about by different exposures to the weather and the like.

Sadly I discovered that when the bricks were in focus but the leaf was not, the photographs didn’t feel right at all, too unbalanced, and I  saw that it would have been better to have stayed in exactly the same position but removed the leaf, photographing only the texture, shape and character of the bricks.

It was a lesson I only learned once the day was over, but c’est la vie, whilst that part didn’t work out I was extremely happy with my leaf and the amount of detail I managed to get from it.

I have a new lens on the camera and aside of unboxing it and trying it out on the shots I took earlier of the birds at our Bruinisse holiday accommodation, this will be my first big test using it for a day (well, morning) trip out and about.

We have come out very early for two reasons: firstly, since the shops are not yet open it will not be busy on the streets, secondly I get tired very quickly, even with a ton of pain medication I need to make use of the early morning when I have the most energy. For a detail fanatic like me, a chance to try out something like this gives me great pleasure, I will file this is my arty “reference library” of shots to hopefully draw later.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

September 24, 2015

Detail Galore… Where Do I Begin…

In many of my earlier Maastricht posts, I mentioned that this is one of the oldest cities in the Netherlands and that there is detail enough to keep a photographer busy for months. In my next series of posts I’m going to look at more of this detail…  the tiny bits of architectural detail that most people are in too much of a hurry to look at, or have grown up with so many old buildings that they just don’t see the detail any more.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

September 3, 2015

Detail To Keep Me Busy For A Month And More…

The amount of detail around Maastricht literally has to be seen to be believed. I think I could spend a month here and still not exhaust the architectural  beauty of the central city. Here is a photographic post for detail fanatics everywhere to drool over…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 27, 2015

Katharinenkirche: Through The Doors Of Detail…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

When we visited Frankfurt am Main in 2013, we stumbled on the fact the that the Frankfurt Marathon was on during one of the days of our stay only by the fact that we happened to be in the centre of the city at the time it was on.

Yesterday I made a blog post about the Hauptwache (guardhouse), but that’s not the only amazing building in this location because literally just steps away on the opposite side of the … we can find an amazing church: “Katharinenkirche” (St. Catherine’s Church)

Wikipedia  (link at bottom of the post) tells me that: ” Katharinenkirche is the largest Lutheran church in Frankfurt am Main, dedicated to the martyred early Christian saint, Catherine of Alexandria.

It is located in the old city centre near one of the most famous plazas in the city, the Hauptwache (Main Guard).

The current church building, built between 1678 and 1681 replaced the Ss. Catherine’s and Barbara Chapel from the late 14th century.  

With the adoption of the Lutheran Reformation by the Free Imperial City of Frankfurt in 1533 the city unilaterally appropriated all religious buildings within its old city centre.

This status was statutorily fixed in 1830 by the deeds of dotation, which is why St. Catherine’s is one of the city’s dotation churches left for eternal usage by a Lutheran congregation.

The German writer, artist, and politician Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749–1832) was baptized in this church in 1749.

This church is built in the baroque style and stands 54 meters in height. St. Catherine’s was destroyed in 1944 by the Allied bombing of Frankfurt am Main during the Second World War. The city reconstructed its church between 1950 and 1954. “

As with yesterday’s post, it’s hard to get photographs because of the barriers put up for the Frankfurt Marathon, but I do my best…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Catherine%27s_Church,_Frankfurt

 

December 29, 2014

Zooming In On The Blocks…

Filed under: GERMANY,Legoland Germany — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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Regular readers of this blog will know that I’m a lover of detail, fanatical even. So when other people are looking at the general overview of things, I’m zooming in on the detail. I’m sure that many of the smaller children do see a lot of it though because they have a lower line of sight and a completely different perspective than the adults do.  Here’s a photographic post featuring just a tiny fraction of the detail that I captured…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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Our German friend in Frankfurt identified this as: “Rheingau Die Burg Pfalzgrafenstein vom Sauzahn”…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

August 28, 2014

Design, Colour And Texture … Getting Up Close.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The date was October 2012, the place was the tiny village of Kissos, Greece, the reason was because it was the half term school holiday and because our in-laws who have a holiday home on the Pelion peninsular had been telling us for years how amazing this area of Greece was.

So have every other friend and relative who’s visited here before us.

They were not wrong.

This area of Greece is a long long way from towering apartment blocks and streets jam packed with all night clubs and bars, and long may it continue to be so.

This is magical beautiful original Greece, and the magic once again is in the detail.

This is architecture of the sort I adore, there is care, attention and detail that goes far further than the piecing of the structure together so that it stands up.  The doors, the windows, even the grave stones are decorated. You know me by now, I adore detail….  so here it is, the ornamentation, the close-up in all of it’s designs, colours and textures.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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July 12, 2014

The Detail Of The Earth: But I Want To Know MORE…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

If anyone wants to invent something that could be seriously interesting for the flying traveller, then I have an idea that I think would be very popular.

I’d love for someone would make an “App” for airlines where you don’t just get a vague world map and a plane icon that gives you a rough idea that you are “somewhere over India”, but rather one that would be brilliantly and fabulously detailed.

Regular readers will know that I adore detail, but I also have a love of geography, maps both old and new and I would love it if the aircraft window offered me a view of a town in a valley with little highways , dotted villages, rivers and lakes, to know exactly which  town, valley, mountain range or lake we were flying over that that exact moment.

Google Earth and satalite images are nothing new any more, so surely it should be possible to make an system for airlines that would tell the passengers exactly which part of a coast line they were following,  give an actual name  in “real time” to the tiny harbour they are seeing and things like that?

I heard once that there are tourists so geographically challenged that they hop on a flight to some sunny spot without actually knowing where their destination country is on a map, or what countries they may have passed over to get there.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Even the very thought amazes me, in our house whenever we plan a trip somewhere the atlas is poured over, maps looked up, possible side trips explored and local specialities investigated.

To be able to see in detail your exact location as you watch the landscape below pass by would be to me an excellent way for window seat passengers to pass the time, a brilliant teaching tool for children, a way to extend people’s knowledge of the cultures and countries in world we live in and, even, at a stretch, an opportunity to promote tourism.

If a passenger for instance saw a beautiful beach, a historic harbour or pretty village by a lake in the mountains and they knew exactly where it was, who knows, it might inspire them to visit there in person one day and explore the views from ground level.

At the very least an extension of the idea could be that you would get to know the name of the tiny historic harbour you just flew over and maybe also a few interesting facts on the plane’s computer App. about the place, it’s history and people.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Nearing the end of our flight in October 2012, we fly over mountains and lakes that pique my curiosity, my sister-in-law thinks they might be in Bulgaria but she’s not really certain because it’s hard to judge the distances covered during flight time.

Have you ever also looked out the window of a plane, seen something interesting below and wished you knew more?

Or is this wish just one of Kiwidutch’s geeky quirks and probably other people really couldn’t care less?
We are approaching the airport in Volos, Greece.

My sister-in-law warns me that the airstrip is shared by a Greek military base on the other side so photography isn’t encouraged. I’ve already taken some photographs but will post just a few here, the vague ones that won’t get me into any trouble.Volos airport looms closer in the dusty heat, it was definitely a chilly autumn back in The Netherlands, after three and a half hours flying it’s like stepping back into summer again. I’m going to like Greece methinks… a lot.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

charleroi to greece 3x (Small)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

March 23, 2014

Seeing What’s In, On And Around The Windows… Doors and Walls…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

One of the things that always piques my curiosity when looking at old  buildings is the seemingly “standard” practice of the architects of centuries past to infuse their designs with tiny details that are extra to the overall design of the building.

Sometimes these additions are decorative roof  touches, patterns in the brickwork,  window adornments, stone carved details, tiles or plaques.

I often find that new, modern building are completely devoid of embellishment, they are rarely tactile and for me are the equivalent of a visual desert, compared with the packed rainforest of detail that exists in their centuries old counterparts.

Sometimes the details are stashed away like tiny treasures, waiting to be noticed and enjoyed only by a very observant few, but in general you don’t have to look too hard, there is plenty of “building bling” on show  so you can quickly spot the embellishments that give these buildings  additional character and  charm.

Back in the summer of 2012 I was walking around central Delft with my visiting Singaporean friend “Velvetine”. As usual  since she also loves architectural detail, old historic stuff and photography we have our respective cameras in hand and are kept busy by the sheer abundance of possible shots.  I will admit that a few extra photographs crept into this post: flowers, window ornaments and the like, but they are detail too so hey, why not?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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February 9, 2014

Inspiration In Gold As A Parting Gift…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Two days ago I made a post about the amazing  interior decoration of the former winter Palace of Queen regent Emma of the Netherlands,  located on the Lange Voorhout in The Hague.

The M. C. Escher museum has been fabulous and visiting friend “Velvetine” and I have drooled over every room and exhibit… in fact there is so much to see in these complex works of art that I think if I came every week I could still discover new details each time  I looked.

Now, for my final post here in the museum I’m returning to the architectural detail of the rooms that hold these ingenious artworks, the beautiful detail that is so different to, and yet matches and compliments the detail found in M.C. Escher’s works.

Carved marble, wood, ornamental plasterwork and gilding are full of ornate detail and exude craftsmanship of a bygone age and as usual I’m adding these images to my  electronic “inspiration” files so that I can use them to inspire me in future artwork projects of my own.  I love patterns and shapes, I love how the fluid images in nature have been transformed into fluid images in plaster, the acanthus leaf decorations and the perfectly formed marble flowers.

I’m not too mobile at the moment, but if I had been then I would surely be tempted to be here often, very often, and maybe one day in the future  I might be found here with a sketchbook in hand, trying to capture details like the marble blossoms in one the fireplaces… One day when my concentration skills are better and when my foot is less  painful and in better working order. Until then I will look at these photographs and dream.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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January 12, 2014

Half-Timbers And Full Detail…

Filed under: GERMANY,Monschau,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Another blog post detailing our 2012 summer travels with visiting Singaporean friend “Velvetine”.

Recent posts are all from  the historic town of Monschau in Germany and I realised as I went to post some more photographs about the architecture around the central square that I’d forgotten to give you some information about the town.  Wikipedia to the rescue as usual:

Monschau (French: Montjoie, Walloon: Mondjoye) is a small resort town in the Eifel region of western Germany located in the district Aachern, North Rhine-Westphalia.

On the heights above the city is Monschau castle, which dates back to the 13th century — the first mention of Monschau was made in 1198. Beginning in 1433, the castle was used as a seat of the dukes of Jȕlich. In 1543, Emperor Charles V besieged it as part of the Geldern Feud, captured it and plundered the town. However, the castle stayed with Jülich until 1609, when it became part of Palatinate-Neuburg.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

In 1795, the French captured the area and, under the name Montjoie, made it the capital of a canton of the Roer département. . After the area became part of the Kingdon of Prussia in 1815, Monschau became the district capital of the Kreis Montjoie.

During World War I, some people argued that Monschau (or “Montjoie” as it was then still called) should be annexed to Belgium since they believed it historically to be a Walloon area that had been Germanized by the Prussians.

In 1918, William II, German Emperor, changed the name to Monschau.In 1972, the town was enlarged with the previous independent municipalities of Höfen, Imgenbroich, Kalterherberg, Konzen, Mützenich and Rohren. 

There are details everywhere, from the half-timbered patternes in the wood, decorations on the cafe’s, the patterns in the roof tiles, and brightly coloured and often co-ordinated flower boxes that adorn the windows. Preened and ready for the tourist cameras, Monschau knows how to present it’s pretty face to the world.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monschau

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