Local Heart, Global Soul

October 16, 2018

Reefton Lights Up The Southern Hemisphere…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Family Kiwidutch went on a road trip in January 2018, making a side trip away from their favourite haunt in Hanmer Springs.

We have left Maruia Springs and our mornings tea (well, breakfast for the kids) and head onwards until we come to a fork in the highway.

The map tells us that branching to the north on State Highway 65 would eventually bring us out in Nelson, (yellow line on the map below) another New Zealand gem all on it’s own, but for future trip.

Staying on State Highway 7 will bring us to Greymouth, via Reefton (red line). Shortly after Reefton the road branches again, keeping west brings us out in Greymouth, whereas branching to the north-west would bring you to Westport (blue line) Ergo the Kilometre distance marker to each being exactly the same.

We are heading to Greymouth, so following the red line. I am informed by Wikipedia that: “In 1888 Reefton became the first town in New Zealand and the Southern Hemisphere to receive electricity,the work of Walter Prince, and its streets were lit by commercial electricity generated by the Reefton Power Station.

Rich veins of gold found in a quartz reef near the town led to its name, and also its former name of Quartzopolis. (Kiwi’s note: “Quartzopolis” sounds like the name of the villains lair in a comic strip or movie).

Intrigued by a name I have never heard of I did a quick search and found this http://www.ipenz.org.nz/heritage/itemdetail.cfm?itemid=2096 “Engineering Heritage of New Zealand”: “In 1886, following a demonstration of electric lighting in four of the hotels in Reefton by self styled “electrician”, Walter Prince, it was decided to form a company to build a power station to provide electricity for the lighting the town.

The Reefton Power Station was completed a few years later and on 4 August 1888 it became the first public power supply in New Zealand.”
Gold was first discovered near the town in 1866, although the major discovery was made in 1870. Soon after, the town briefly boasted a population of several thousand. This later dwindled to less than a thousand. Other industries in the town are coal mining, forestry, tourism and angling.

The town as it is today looks lively, and very much geared up for the passing tourist trade, taking advantage of the winding roads, vastly different driving conditions than most northern hemisphere tourists are used to and thus the need for a break from driving, restrooms and refreshments. This is a country town with plenty of guts and life, staying relevant and making the most of it’s location. I could live In Reefton very happily indeed.

Hanmer to Greymouth, Map made via Google Earth.

Opps… I forgot to add the map until some hours after this posted, apologies. (I’d made the post several weeks before, and the map at the last minute because I thought it would help to visualise how the route we took looked on a map.) Then of course I forgot to actually add the map to the blog post. Duh… I’ll blame my pain medications but realistically I just have moments of stupid and this apparently was one of them!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

July 1, 2016

If You Can’t Take The Highway, Then Take The Byways…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I mentioned in earlier posts that during our stay last summer in Germany, the weather turned nasty and provided us with a large helping of rain.

After the first full day of heavy rain the kids were going stir crazy without internet in our accommodation, so in the evening Himself and I went to Reception, logged on and found that local weather was for the same or worse the next day but was forecasted as considerably better just a little way further south.

Therefore a car journey the following day sounded like an excellent plan, and we kicked the kids out of bed early and hit the road.

No sooner had we left the hilly area we were in when the rain stopped and everyone’s mood rose with anticipation of getting to go something nice outdoors today.

Traffic however also stopped shortly afterwards and Little Mr became excited when hearing approaching sirens. Just in front of us we could see an on-ramp onto the motorway, first came a police car, then a fire engine, then more police cars, an ambulance and then another fire engine. We could not see what was going on ahead of us but if became clear that it was something serious and the road wasn’t going to be cleared any time soon. Our stroke of good luck was that we were right next to an “Ausfahrt” (Exit) and after some consideration we decided to leave via that.

We were just exiting when yet another fire engine came speeding down the On ramp. Whatever was going on down there, this traffic was going to be waiting  a while for good people in the Emergency services to do their work and this was an excellent moment for us to leave them in peace to do it. We therefore leave the highways and proceed south on the byways.

We see a strange looking tower that turns out to be the most unusual electricity pylon I have ever seen in my life. We also take a few stops to combat the car sickness that Little Mr’s guest suffers from severely, breaks that Kiwi Daughter and I also appreciate for the same reason. These little roads give a different perspective of the countryside, you never know what you will find.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

January 1, 2015

Some People Are Really Live Wires…

Filed under: Funny,GERMANY,Ichenhausen,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , ,

The next unusual sight we see around the area of Legoland Germany was found in a field close to the road we were travelling on. There was a row of electricity pylons and for the first time ever we have seen men working on the wires. I know that some linesmen work when the lines are still live, but I’m not certain if that is the case on pylons that carry this kind of serious voltage. Either way it looks like dangerous work and even if you have the courage to work with this level of electricity, you also have to have a very good head for heights. Hmm… that rules me out for the first bit and Himself out on the second, so our admiration for the people who do this work sours.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

August 30, 2010

It’s bold! it’s bright! it’s Electric!

Filed under: THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , ,

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

We are  leaving Katwijk and have a small drive along  the beach.

Most of the spots we stopped at involved more walking to get to the sand than my Mother in Law wanted, so we don’t end up stopping anywhere.

Still, this little number caught our attention and we stopped so that I could add some photos to my collection of decorated Electricity Substations.

To see the rest of the collection please see here:

https://kiwidutch.wordpress.com/2010/08/19/new-85/ and

https://kiwidutch.wordpress.com/?s=substation and

https://kiwidutch.wordpress.com/2010/02/14/new-post-25/

https://kiwidutch.wordpress.com/2010/01/13/electricity-substations-works-of-art/ and here…

https://kiwidutch.wordpress.com/2010/07/22/new-54/

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

August 19, 2010

An Electricity Substation that lights up your day…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I’m adding again to my collection of decorated electricity substations  that are situated in various parts of the Hague.

The ones I have found so far are in the following links:

https://kiwidutch.wordpress.com/?s=substation and

https://kiwidutch.wordpress.com/2010/02/14/new-post-25/

https://kiwidutch.wordpress.com/2010/01/13/electricity-substations-works-of-art/ and here…

https://kiwidutch.wordpress.com/2010/07/22/new-54/

This next substation is located behind the petrol station at the junction where  the Valkenboslaan , the Loosduinseweg and the  Valkenboskade  in Den Haag (The Hague), The Netherlands.

I took these photos earlier in the year, in February when winter was still in force.

The box actually faces the water of the Valkenboskade (canal) so I could only therefore photograph three of the four sides.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The images are intense and dramatic… I’m still making up my mind if I actually like this one or not.

What I do like, is that sunshine or rain, this substation simply blazes colour and surely must put a smile on the dourest of faces.

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