Local Heart, Global Soul

June 24, 2015

Oooh, These Gargoyles Are Pulling Some Very Funny Faces…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Himself and I are in Kranenburg, situated just over the German border close to the Dutch city of Nijmegen, where I have some time to kill between hospital appointments.

Our attention was first drawn to an old mill tower, and closer inspection revealed a late Gothic style church just around the corner.

Of course, being a detail fanatic I had to stop and take a look. The Roman Catholic church is called “St Petrus und Pauluskirche” (The Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul) and I’m delighted to find a wealth of stone carving and architectural detail.

After a while I managed to tear my eyes away from doorways and windows and looked further up, discovering some wonderful stonework near the roof and surprising myself when I saw gargoyles.

These were clearly not 15th century gargoyles because they didn’t fit at all with the Gothic style of the rest of the building, in fact I’d hazard a guess that the linear style suggests maybe a Deco influence.

What’s even more surprising is the quirky nature of the  gargoyles, they are cheeky and very stylised and really rather appealing. I can see a strange mixture of dog and bat in one of the figures, and a pig… one that might be a wolf but with wings, and several other stylised ones. Then there are several others that are completely different…. one a nude female figure holding back her long hair and a naked horned male figure holding onto his long flowing beard in his hands. Other stylised forms are leafy things of much older origin, and some sort of figure or forms even in the wrought iron door handles. There are also a small stone balcony and other decorative stonework such as balustrades and finials.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

The Roman Catholic Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul / Petrus en Pauluskerk (Kranenburg)

April 17, 2014

Zooming In, You Never Know What You Might See…

Once a detail fanatic, always a detail fanatic… blogger or no blogger back in the Spring of 2009 I still filled my camera with close ups and as much detail as I could manage. This trip to Paris was no different, here is a photographic post on the stunning detail of Sacré-Cœur…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Gargoyle? No, just a cheeky imp…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

August 6, 2013

Spouting Off About Gargoyles and Architectural Detail…

Filed under: Ely: Cathedral,ENGLAND,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , , ,
(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Regular readers of my blog will know I’m a detail fanatic. I love nothing better than architectural detail in stone, tile, brick,  glass, wood or iron work.

Born in New Zealand’s South Island where amazing scenery abounds but buildings over a century old are few, I am fascinated by old buildings,  the more ancient the better.

Here  around England’s Ely Cathedral are a number of ancient buildings, all of which sport wonderful architectural detail.  I hardly know where to point the camera first.

On the upper two stories of one building are figures of a man and a woman, each holding a heraldic type shield… from a noble family? Royalty? or region? I don’t know, but the mere fact that carved figures, that took time, skill and money to make, make up just a small fraction of the ornamentation of this building is amazing.

For instance: Instead of making a  a plain stone drain pipe, a decorative gargoyle has been made to spout the rain water away from the building… not just functional but ornamental and beautiful as well.  Do we really need patterns in the bricks to make a building structurally sound? No… but making it aesthetically pleasing was obviously deemed just as important and they did it anyway. These buildings have not just the style of their age but also the character and humour of it too. Architects of today are truly missing a lesson on how to make people stop and stare in wonder at their work, not just in their lifetime but for centuries afterwards.  Let’s take a detailed look…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ely_Cathedral

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