Local Heart, Global Soul

May 16, 2013

Carving Out Inspiration And Adoration of Nature in The Acanthus And The Golden Mean…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I’m inside Sint-Romboutskathedraal (St. Rumbold’s Cathedral) in the Belgian city of Mechelen.

Just inside the door and to the left is an amazing piece of  exquisitely carved marble.

It stands very low… almost too low from an aesthetic point of view so I suspect that it probably sat upon some sort of low wall when it was originally made.  (or maybe it was made as a seat?)

I’m instantly drawn to the beautiful stonework because I see acanthus leaf and grape vine forms along with angel and cherub figures.

I adore the gentle swirls of the acanthus, they follow the “golden mean” (also called the “golden ratio”) which is a mathematical formula where the parts fit into the sum within a geometric form.

The formula in present everywhere throughout nature: from shells to leaves and is popular in art because of the  proportions aesthetically pleasing and harmonious to the human eye. This is nature at it’s most graceful and intricate, and the effect is of course exactly the same when copied by human hands into art-forms and designs.

At one end four cherubs pile up sheaves of wheat, at the other another four appear to harvest grapes, a man and a woman (King and Queen?)  kneel at the center surrounded by cherubs supporting a crown, there are two larger cherubs at each end: one with something in a basket and the other with what I think is an early form of beehive (formed in circular rings).

Even though this massive piece of five marble sections fit together perfectly and rest on a low plinth, it’s still very low, and for me still walking with one crutch, rather difficult to get down and photograph. Most of these photos are intended for my own simple enjoyment, because I adore the detail, but I also intend to use them at some future moment as inspiration in my artwork.

I can only urge you if ever you are in the vicinity to take a moment to see this in person, my photographs really do not do this stunning piece of carving justice.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Rumbold’s_Cathedral

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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