Local Heart, Global Soul

December 29, 2018

I Could Look At This Scene Day After Day, After Day…

Following yesterday’s post in Zeeland’s Bruinisse fishing harbour, I kept attempting to capture the beautiful reflections in the water as daylight started to slip away. Using my camera zoom to the maximum and driving from one point along the waterfront (a very short distance but saving me some walking), different views appear both in the distance and close by. I did get distracted by a metal guardrail that had some beautiful rust patterns on it at one point, and frustrated that I was unable to zoom even more for some of the structures like the mussel nets in the distance. It was a beautiful evening and the scene here is one that I could look at day after day after day.


(photograph © Kiwidutch)

December 28, 2018

Beautiful Scenes Difficult To Capture: And Some To Be Avoided…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Himself and I eventually found the Bruinisse fishing boat harbour, after a small (cough, cough) “tour” of most of the town.

Since we were just essentially sightseeing and having a curious look around, the time did not matter too much.

Spaghetti bolognaise had been promised to the kids for dinner, but as able bodied teenagers they were perfectly able to rustle up something from the groceries we had brought with as an early dinner or snack if their stomachs rumbled.

We both knew that their was a fairly slim chance of that happening, with both of our offspring being apparently allergic to the kitchen despite all urgings and encouragement whilst they were growing up.

The crackers that Himself had packed for his after dinner cheeseboard would in all probability go missing, and when their stomachs rumbled loud enough after those they would phone us and ask why we were taking so long. Of course they could then cook themselves but I would predict chaos, leading to short tempers between the two, a large fight and not just a gigantic mess in the kitchen but also an atmosphere of daggers for the rest of the evening. For Himself’s and my sanities sake, dumping short notice crash-course cooking lessons on our offspring sans parental supervision should be avoided at all costs.

In the meantime Himself and I seem to accidently landed on not only a very photogenic fishing harbour but also one of the best times of day to photograph it since there is no wind.

The sea is calm within the harbour walls and both the land and the sea have many items of interest so I barely know where to start pointing my lens.

The edge of the harbour at this point at least, as been lined with large rocks which have been carefully placed together as to make as few gaps as possible. They have been laid last the waters edge and extend as far as the eye can see. This is a beautiful feature all on it’s own. I’m very interested in the reflections of boats and jetties in the water, but capturing them is more difficult than I thought, especially without a tripod. I might not be doing the scenery justice but in the attempt, I am at least having fun.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

July 25, 2013

At the Harbour Unloading Commences as We Enjoy the View…

Filed under: ENGLAND,Folkestone — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , ,
(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Last summer we scooped up our Singaporean friend “Velvetinenut” after she landed at the Dutch airport of Schipol and within 12 hours had hit the road on the start of a travel adventure.

Luckily for her jet-lag, after a swift trip across the English channel we stayed several nights with friends in Folkestone and the weather has turned from the rain we’ve all had for months to a serious 28C (82F) so even adjusting to the cold hasn’t been an issue.

Today we will be cooking dinner for our hosts, so have been shopping and will be spending some time in the kitchen, but the rest of the day is to be enjoyed too so one of our hosts is talking us to one of his favourite haunts.

We find ourselves in the harbour, where there are plenty of people out enjoying the sunshine and lots of business for local establishments.

Little Mr. , followed by Himself sprints off down the boat ramp to get this fingers and toes wet in the sea, the rest of us stay on the quayside above and enjoy the view of boats and people. Little Mr. is forced to evacuate the boat ramp by the arrival of vehicles coming to meet fishermen coming to bring in their early morning catch, but we have a ringside seat as we lazily watch other people work hard in the hot sun.

The air is filled with seagulls looking for any tasty morsel going free (or if luck have it,  even ones that are not) and during the course of the proceedings a few of them get lucky: although they also had to contend with an onslaught of fellow seagull thieves whilst trying to escape to a quieter spot to eat their ill gotten gains.

The sunlight is sparkling on the water… it’s a stunning day to be enjoying the view…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

July 10, 2013

Bigger Obstacles Than I Imagined, But The Effort Is Worth It In The End…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The swim that I promised Little Mr. in yesterday’s post  apparently involves a short walk to a beach and swimming area that passes by the marina / harbour area of Veere.

Little Mr. was happy to stop and look at the various boats in the harbour, and spent most of the time tell me which one(s)  he really thought we should buy, despite me telling him that some of these cost the same as a decent chunk of our house.

I’m fast learning that the downside of saving hard so that you can travel as much as possible,  is that your kids acquire expensive tastes and wish-lists  having seen everything from massive touring vehicles, places to stay with indoor swimming pools and beautiful gardens to luxury boats.

My standard retort now is “Yes, my sweethearts, when  you work hard and become  rich you will be able to afford to buy all of these for your father and mother and we will be delighted to use them well, until then …wishing for all of us is free”. I’ve found some more history about Veere… to keep you interested as we make our way to the beach…

“The small city of Veere (population approx 1500) is located on the Veerse Meer on the island of Walcheren in Zeeland. The name means “ferry” after Wolfert Van Borsselen established one here in 1281. Veere received city rights in 1355. 

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The “Admiraliteit van Veere” (Admiralty of Veere) was set up as a result of the Ordinance on the Admiralty of 8 January 1488 in an attempt to create a central naval administration in the Burgundian Netherlands. To this was subordinated the Vice-Admiralty of Flanders in Dunkirk.

In 1560 under admiral Philip de Montmorency, Count of Hoorn this admiralty was relocated near Ghent and in 1561 the Habsburg naval forces were also moved to Veere.

Veere was the staple port for Scotland between 1541 and 1799. Flemish architects Antonis Keldermans and Evert Spoorwater designed the Grote Kerk, the fortifications, the Cisterne and the town hall. In the 17th and 18th centuries, Veere was a prosperous trading city.

There were about 750 houses inside the city walls then, compared to about 300 now. As a result of the damming of the Veerse Gat inlet in 1961, the fishing fleet of Veere moved to a new home port at Colijnsplaat on Noord-Beveland. Today, the main business of the town is tourism and the area is visited by 4 million tourists annually. The main attractions are the beaches and marinas. The Storm Surge Barrier on the Oosterschelde is the most popular visitor attraction in Zeeland.

One thing our friend didn’t warn us about was the size of the walls of the fortifications… and the steepness of the staircase we needed to negotiate to get past them. I’m supposed to be walking longer distances like this with my crutches, but actually underestimated the distance and completely underestimated the terrain so my walking stick  had to do. In fact I was rather proud that I managed it, ok, It was no fast journey to be certain but like the tortoise in the  fable I plodded along and eventually finished the race.

My physiotherapist  will be delighted at the achievment:  in fact the only unhappy part of the equation was my foot which hurt like crazy  after my walking tour so I retired to a comfortable chair in the shade  with my foot elevated for the rest of the day.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

It’s possible to take the longer walkways around the old city walls…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

This staircase came as a bit of a shock to me, but the little beach is just on the other side of these low bushes…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Boat traffic of every shape and size enjoying the fabulous weather…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

No small building project…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The little stretch of sand is popular, (and it looks like I’m the only one sitting in the shade of the bushes by the path…) Little Mr. enjoys his swim a lot so the effort to get here was well worth it.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Veere

February 14, 2013

Taking On the Dark Side of the Harbour…

Filed under: AMSTERDAM,PHOTOGRAPHY,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , ,
(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Until I took this particular trip I didn’t know how difficult it would be to take photographs on a moving vessel that occasionally also rocked in the wake of other passing traffic, in fading light and inclement weather.

Indeed at one point rain lashed the windows on one side of the boat whilst I took photos on the sheltered side but then there was the small matter of everything inside the boat being reflected in the windows I was photographing through, effectively superimposing an additional image onto the one I was trying to capture.

I discovered that by putting the camera lens as close to the window as possible (completely touching the glass was good) did manage to eliminate  the worst of the reflection  but sudden movements of the boat on several occasions produced a nasty sound as the lens smacked a little too roughly into the glass so I cringed an held my breath that my camera would still be in working order after the trip. It was, so I’m thankful for small mercies… but the protective lens cover / filter thingy probably will need replacing sooner than later as I’ve been giving it a fair share of abuse in the shape of knock and bumps of late.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Opening the door to eliminate the glass was completely out of the question, even if the rain didn’t get inside, the stiff wind and frigid cold certainly would have raised objections from other guests. Also not to mention that the door opened directly out to the side of the boat, and ego the dark sea we were navigating, so passengers opening to door whilst the boat clipped along at a very decent rate down the harbour would have instantly had the crew freaking out for very valid health and safety reasons.

The obvious solution was to come back in summer, when it would at least be daylight at this early evening hour and there was some chance (albeit slim if last summer was anything to go by) of clear skies and even sunshine.

I did my best and was most interested in the contrast of the many buildings who’s only common denominator was that they are visible from the water.

Centuries old buildings stand next to or in the shadow of ones that look only five minutes old, old factories, heavy industrial, light industrial, residential, the transport hubs of Central Station and the ferries, a catamaran ferry flies past us at breakneck speed, shipping vessels of all ages and shapes are around us… in motion or at rest,  commercial offices, public buildings and marinas too.

So many of them could easily deserve an entire blog post to themselves,  there is history, research and stories to find and tell, but that’s for another day because my work commitments at the moment are especially heavy and my free time is significantly reduced.

Let’s therefore take a tour on the dark side of the harbour… and see what we find…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 12, 2013

Flat as a Pancake… On The Water!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

We’ve kept an eye on the clock, refrained from buying too much tat at the flea market and have now walked back to the place where we need to be for our appointment.

This in practice means we are standing on a dock.

The second surprise we had for the kids was that we would all be going on a boat tour, but one with a difference: this is “de pannenkoekenboot ” (The Pancake Boat) and you get to eat unlimited pancakes whilst you are given a tour of part of the outer waterways of Amsterdam.

This is not an inner city canal trip, but the part of the IJ that incorporates the “havens” (harbours) .

We had originally tried to book the “Family Cruise” which is a two and a half hour cruise starting at 1.30 p.m. but this tour turned out to be full so our next option was the 16:30 sailing and a trip for on hour. Although I was at first disappointed by the fact that we missed our first choice (we only tried to reserve this the day before so left it too late… the moral of the story is that you need to reserve as early as possible if you want to be guaranteed a specific time slot)  it turned out to be a blessing in disguise.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

First with the earlier sailing we would have been very rushed getting here from our tour of Schiphol Airport, and second the weather is way too cold for outside dining (it’s possible on the top deck in good weather) and the top deck is closed.

This means we are eating on the lower deck, and it’s winter, it’s trying hard to rain and light is fading… for today at least a sailing tour of just one hour is more than enough.

In the height of summer with sunshine and more daylight hours, I think the longer two and a half hour tour would be more exciting because you could see things properly from outside.

One all the tours there are unlimited pancakes;  they start with the three most popular which are natural, spek (bacon) and apple pancakes and you get to add some of the various toppings as well if you want.

I went first for the classic Dutch pancake: spek, where the bacon is cooked into the pancake as it cooks and once it’s done you drizzle stroop (syrup) over it and eat! Stroop is unlike any syrup I’ve ever had outside of the Netherlands, it’s not maple syrup or golden syrup, or Caro or molasses, it has a taste all of it’s own. My second pancake was a plain one with peaches on top… yum!

The rest of the group also had spek, or  plain pancakes with icing sugar (powdered sugar), or in the case of the kids, plain pancakes with a scattering of sweets on top. We were one of  the biggest groups on the boat this sailing so we were allocated a long table near the front of the boat, and there was even a handy little seat for our youngest sailor.

We watched as people streamed onto the NDSM Ferries that go from here to the Houthaven  and Central Station (the ferry ride is free) and then at the appointed moment we too were pushing away from the dock and out into the haven. The pancakes are good!… let’s take a look around…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

May 20, 2012

A City of Sails, Maze of Roads, a Bridge and a Big Sigh of Relief for the Tom Tom…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

In part of my retroactive diary tour of New Zealand, we are heading into Auckland…. New Zealand’s biggest city.

We come in close to Pukekohe  near the bottom of  the map (pronounced as “pook-ah-coe-ee“) and are later exit north on the road by the top of the map by Albany. This will necessitate crossing the Auckland Harbour via the Auckland Harbour Bridge, since it’s the short-cut route across the harbour.

The city is actually a merger of Manukau city and Manukau harbour on side, and Auckland city and Auckland harbour on the other.

Only a narrow  band of  land joins the landmass of Northland to the rest of the North Island … and the countries biggest city straddles this strip of land, so needless to say we aren’t looking forward to the traffic jams we think we might be in for.

Luckily after a stop in the city to see a family member, we manage to hit the road  at a less busy time and somehow, miracle of miracles, without any great hassle or stops.

Of course upon reflection that fact that tomorrow is New Year’s Eve, that it’s the summer school holiday period and that many New Zealand businesses close between Christmas and New Year, probably had more to do with the lack of congestion than good timing on our part.

I remember trips to Auckland in my childhood,  a South Island girl overawed by the existence of a motorway system that carried more traffic than I’d ever seen in my life before,  I live of course with motorways now, in The Netherlands but I’m in Europe, so that seems kind of  normal and expected with such a large population to move around, whereas I never got used to motorways in New Zealand and the sum total of one  five kilometres long to the north of Christchurch really doesn’t count.

Auckland’s motorways were today more or less as  I remembered them… but they’ve grown from the toddler sized network of my childhood into a full grown version today, so much so that I thought  several times that we must surely be in Auckland city, long before we actually reached it.

This is one time we are very thankful for the TomTom we picked up from Teddy our favourite rental car owner before setting out for the North Island, during our travels throughout  Auckland the thing is definitely paying it’s way.

The rain is still coming down in fits and starts and the cloud layer is very low, so we can’t even see the top of Auckland’s Sky Tower, … but we still get glimpses of the Auckland, and bridge and the marina’s around it that give it the nickname “the  City of Sails”.

I didn’t notice it at the time, but after putting the photos onto the computer I saw that I’d captured an image of tourists walking over the top span of the Auckland Harbour Bridge… I’d love to be brave enough to do that one day but think that my head for heights (actually great lack of it) is rooted deep in my Dutch genes and since you know I’m accident prone, it’s another activity that I think might be safer to dream about than actually do.

Now that our Auckland appointment is out of the way, we head even further northward, Northland awaits…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Juxtaposition of the roof of a typical  traditional New Zealand villa against a modern skyline… I might get nostalgic for the sight of a brick chimney too, since there are precious few left in Christchurch after the earthquakes.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

September 7, 2011

Old Harbour at Santa Maria…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Since Cape Verde is situated off the West Coast of Africa,  off the coast of Senegal, The Gambia and in the region of Mauritania, Guinea-Bisseau, Guinea and Sierra Leone,  sadly the old harbour at Santa Maria was in centuries past used as a stopping and transfer point during  the slave trade.

Fortunately these days are long gone and it’s now only used  for fishing and swimming… but mostly only swimming at  low tide becuase at high tide the sea surges though the narrow gap and if you are in the water there’s a strong outward suction.

I’m a very rudimentary swimmer and I didn’t feel confident in the water when the tide was high so we didn’t let the kids in here anywhere around high tide, and since the hotel awimming pool was so close by and our kids loved sandcastle building as much as the water,  it wasn’t a problem to not swim here very often.

We saw very very few locals go into the water here but every so often some kids come to fish from the old harbour walls.

Most of  the harbour is in it’s simple, origonal state, but some repairs have been done over the decades.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

April 26, 2011

Everything Neatly Contained!

Filed under: Places and Sights,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , , , , ,

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Decades ago, cargo was stored in the holds of ships,  packed in crates, barrels and loaded mostly by hand using cranes, pulley’s and nets.

Space on board was not ergonomically used and loading and unloading took manpower and time.

Then came the Container… steel boxes of uniform size what had ships specifically designed to carry them.

Containers got bigger, and the ships to carry them got bigger still. Times changed and today container shipping is an international mega-industry.

Rotterdam’s Container Port works around the clock, year round.

The massive cranes are manned, with crane operators up high in cabins on the cranes.

If you look carefully in the last video clip, you will see that the operators cabins can travel the length of the boom, so that they can be both in visual range of the ship at the dock at one end and the container “trucks” at the other.

The ships are not tied up at the dock at all, instead there are several tugs alongside, keeping steady pressure on the side of the ship, and keeping it push up against the dockside the entire time that loading or unloading is taking place.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The reasons for this are twofold: speed and money, ships queue to book a “slot” at the quay, and they pay hundreds of thousands of Euros per hour for their slot. (If I remember correctly I think a figure of Euro 35.000,- per hour was mentioned).

It’s so incredibly expensive that they don’t waste time tying up the ship, they just keep it pushed up against the quay and start unloading or loading immediately.

The “truck” transporters that the crane drivers set to containers onto are driver-less, guided by network of computer electronics and a special grid to follow laid out beneath the tarmac.

The cranes that take and stack the containers are also completely automated and everything is carefully ordered to that the correct containers are stacked not only in the correct place but also in the right order.

There are special sensors in the automated trucks so that if if something goes awry and they hit something, or something hits them, the whole network comes to an emergency stop.

We watch from behind a large fence (I poke the camera lens though the mesh to get the photographs)  and the whole “dance of the machines” is quite mesmerizing.

Later see a truck that hauls containers from one area to another area with a multiple trailer “road train” style, as used in  Australian haulage, except that here it’s only use for within the Container Port.

Once again the camera can not do the scene justice… the line of containers stretches further into the distance than the lens can focus, as do the gigantic cranes on the quay.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

April 25, 2011

It is the Custom, to pay your Taxes….

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

In days of old, well before large international corporations, you used to travel over the border, buy commercial goods for your business and when you returned home you’d have to stop at the Customs House at the border crossing and pay the import duty you owed to the tax-man.

“Belastingdienst/Douane” is the Tax / Customs” building, and of course, as trade has become more International, their offices have grown considerably in size.

A few posts ago I mentioned that Rotterdam has become renowned for some very enterprising and original ideas when it comes to its architecture after the Second World War.

This is one that I really like because they had the  delightful idea of actually incorporating one of the old buildings into the new premises! Priceless!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Next Page »

Blog at WordPress.com.