Local Heart, Global Soul

February 19, 2018

Spiraling Around The Helix…

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY,SINGAPORE — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Leaving Singapore’s “Gardens by the Bay”, Family Kiwidutch exit the Marina Bay Sands Hotel and make our way to the Helix bridge.

It’s the pedestrian bridge next to the  Bayfront and Benjamin Shares road bridges and appears to be well used.

I saw the bridge from the Observation deck of the Marina Bay Sands in this post:“Gardens, Floating? Bridges? Not Necessarily In That Order…”  but getting up close to this beautiful spiral bridge is necessary in order to appreciate it’s amazing design.

I was not the only tourist taking photographs from all points of the  Helix bridge, the views across the Marina Bay area towards the CBD, the Merlion and the Float Marina area, are all well deserving of being recorded. Wikipedia tells me:

The Helix Bridge was opened on 18 July 2010 and completed the walkway around Marina Bay.

Canopies (made of fritted-glass and perforated steel mesh) are incorporated along parts of the inner spiral to provide shade for pedestrians. The bridge has four viewing platforms sited at strategic locations which provide stunning views of the Singapore skyline and events taking place within Marina Bay.At night, the bridge will be illuminated by a series of lights that highlight the double-helix structure, thereby creating a special visual experience for the visitors.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Pairs of coloured letters c and g, as well as a and t on the bridge which are lit up at night in red and green represent Cytosine, Guanine, Adenine, and Thymine, the four bases of DNA.

The intentional left handed DNA-like design, which is the opposite of normal DNA on earth, earned it a place in The Left Handed DNA Hall of Fame in 2010.

It won the ‘World’s Best Transport Building’ award at the World Architecture Festival Awards in the same year.

From the outset, the project posed several challenges. There was a desire for the plan view of the bridge to be curved in an arc, such that it joins the foreshore promenades on either side seamlessly.

Furthermore, it was desirable to create a lightweight structure, in contrast to the adjacent 6-lane vehicle bridge which is rather heavy in appearance.Due to the tropical climate, the brief also required the bridge to provide shade and shelter against direct sunshine and heavy rainfall. The combination of these factors, together with the desire to create a landmark structure, led to a novel and unique design.The resulting bridge comprises two delicate helix structures that act together as a tubular truss to resist the design loads. The helix tubes only touch each other in one position, under the bridge deck.

The two spiraling members are held apart by a series of light struts and rods, as well as stiffening rings, to form a rigid structure.The 280 m bridge is made up of three 65 m spans and two 45 m end spans.If the steel were stretched out straight from end to end, it would measure 2.25 km in length. The major and minor helices, which spiral in opposite directions, have an overall diameter of 10.8 m and 9.4 m respectively, about 3 stories high.

Over the river, the bridge is supported by unusually light tapered stainless steel columns, which are filled with concrete. The columns form inverted tripod shapes which support the bridge above each of the pilecaps. The bridge weighs around 1700 tonnes in total.The final pieces of the design are a series of ovular-shaped cantilevered viewing ‘pods’, each with capacity for about 100 people, that extend out on the bay side to create ‘ring-side’ viewing for water events. Hundred of workers have contributed to the completion of the bridge.”

And from a visit four years previous:
“Helix Bridge … DNA and Child’s Play…”

Wikipedia / Helix Bridge / Singapore

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 1, 2018

Gardens, Floating? Bridges? Not Necessarily In That Order…

Filed under: Marina Bay Sands Hotel,PHOTOGRAPHY,SINGAPORE — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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From the Observation deck of Singapore’s Marina Bay Sands, Family Kiwidutch have a really good overview of some of the most famous landmarks in Singapore. The “pictures” on the information boards help to put names to the buildings we can see as well as giving snippets of information to visitors in a multitude of languages. Working our way around the observation deck, I can see and identify sights that might otherwise have gone unnoticed, such as the “Bay East Garden

The Bay East Garden is 32 hectares (79 acres) in size and has a two kilometre promenade frontage that embellishes the Marina Reservoir. It is designed as a series of large tropical leaf-shaped gardens, each with it’s own specific landscaping design, character and theme. Five water inlets are aligned with the prevailing wind direction, maximising and extending the shoreline while allowing wind and water to penetrate the site to help cool areas of activity around them.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Although “Float@MarinaBay” is labelled on one of the Marina Bay Sands Hotel observation deck information board as No.3 and another further along as No.7, the information given for each is exactly the same. The board reads:

The Float@MarinaBay”, Made entirely of steel, the Float@MarinaBay can support up to 1,070 tonnes in weight, with a seating capacity of 30,000 people. It serves as a venue for events on the waters of Marina bay, including sports, concerts, exhibitions and performances such as The National Day Parade. This stadium is also part of the Marina Bay Street  Circuit Turns 17 and 18.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Helix Bridge”. “The Helix Bridge is a pedestrian bridge that links Marina Centre and Marina South. Officially opened on 24 April 2010, the bridge has four viewing platforms providing stunning views of the Singapore skyline and events taking place within Marina Bay. At night the bridge is illuminated with lights that highlight it’s double helix structure, including lighted alphabets “c” (Cytosine), “g” (Guanine, “a” (Adenine) and “t” (Thymine) on the ground, representing the four bases of DNA.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Esplanade”, “The Esplanade boasts the largest performing stage in Singapore. Known affectionately as the “Durian” (a beloved tropical fruit) due to the ridged roof architecture, it’s theatre is built in the style of a traditional European opera house, and it’s concert hall is one of only six in the world with such state-of-the-art acoustics.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Esplanade Bridge”. The Esplanade Bridge is a 260 metre-long, concrete-arched road bridge that spans across the mouth of the Singapore River in Singapore. The bridge was built to provide fast vehicular access between Marina Centre and the financial district of Shenton Way. Construction of the bridge began in early 1994 and was completed in March 1997.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

January 24, 2012

Helix Bridge … DNA and Child’s Play…

Filed under: Landmarks,PHOTOGRAPHY,SINGAPORE,Travel — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

My next photographic “target” on Singapore’s Duck  Tour sits right next to the ArtScience Museum and Gallery of  the day before yeaterday’s post.

If you have been a reader of my blog for any length of time, then you will know how much I appreciate old stuff, especially old stuff made in stone, wood, wrought iron, hand blown or leaded glass.

I love “antique”, I adore “quirky” and I appreciate craftsmanship and detail in many different mediums.
That said, sometimes a little bit of “modern” can catch my eye and turn my head as well. This is one of those times.

This bridge is known as the “Helix Bridge” and so logically enough, it was no surprise to find out from our Duck Tour guide that the design is based on the double helix format of DNA strands.

Wikipedia tells me that:

“Canopies (made of fritted-glass and perforated steel mesh) are incorporated along parts of the inner spiral to provide shade for pedestrians.

The bridge has four viewing platforms sited at strategic locations which provide stunning views of the Singapoe skyline and events taking place within Marina Bay. At night the bridge is illuminated by a series of lights that highlight the double-helix structure.

Pairs of coloured letters “c” and “g” as well as “a” and “t” on the bridge light up at night in red and green to represent cytosine, guanine, adenine and thymine, the four bases of DNA. “

I just like the simplicity and cleaness of the structure… it’s pleasing and harmonous in it’s purity of line, and I find the grace of the interwoven curves mesmerising.     …And I knew I liked it even more when I found this little snippet of information on Wikipedia: “the bridge also functions as a gallery where children’s paintings and drawings are exhibited for public viewing.”

So, beautiful indeed, on so many levels.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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