Local Heart, Global Soul

May 17, 2018

Himeji Castle And A Golden Gate…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I’ve now come to a World landmark in the Te Papa Wellington, New Zealand LEGO exhibition that I know nothing about: Himeji Castle in Japan. I’d like to know more about this beautiful building so did a little bit of research.

Wikipedia tells me: “Himeji Castle is a hilltop Japanese castle complex situated in the city of Himeji, in the Hyōgo Prefecture of Japan. Regarded as the finest surviving example of prototypical Japanese castle architecture, it comprises a network of 83 buildings with advanced defensive systems from the feudal period.

It gained the nickname: Hakuro-jō (“White Heron Castle”) because of its brilliant white exterior and supposed resemblance to a bird taking flight.

Dating from 1333, when Akamatsu Norimura built a fort on top of Himeyama hill.

The fort was dismantled and rebuilt as Himeyama Castle in 1346, and then remodeled into Himeji Castle two centuries later. Himeji Castle was then significantly remodeled in 1581 by Toyotomi Hideyoshi, who added a three-story castle keep.

In 1600, Tokugawa Ieyasu awarded the castle to Ikeda Terumasa for his help in the Battle of Sekigahara, and Ikeda completely rebuilt the castle from 1601 to 1609, expanding it into a large castle complex. The castle complex comprises a network of 83 buildings such as storehouses, gates, corridors, and turrets.

For over 400 years, Himeji Castle has remained intact, even throughout the extensive bombing of Himeji in World War II, and natural disasters such as the 1995 Great Hanshin earthquake.

Himeji Castle is the largest and most visited castle in Japan, and it was registered in 1993 as one of the first UNESCO World Heritage Sites in the country.

The area within the middle moat of the castle complex is a designated Special Historic Site and five structures of the castle are also designated National Treasures.

In order to preserve the castle buildings, it underwent restoration work for several years and reopened to the public on March 27, 2015. The works also removed decades of dirt and grime, restoring the formerly grey roof to its original brilliant white colour.”

It’s interesting to find out about somewhere I have never heard of before… and it’s a very cool LEGO build as well.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Then on the far distant side of the Pacific, we “travel” to the Golden Gate Bridge.

Wikipedia tells us: “The Golden Gate Bridge is a suspension bridge spanning the Golden Gate, the one-mile-wide (1.6 km) strait connecting San Francisco Bay and the Pacific Ocean.

The structure links the American city of San Francisco, California – the northern tip of the San Francisco Peninsula – to Marin County, carrying both U.S. Route 101 and California State Route 1 across the strait.

The bridge is one of the most internationally recognized symbols of San Francisco, California, and the United States.

It has been declared one of the Wonders of the Modern World by the American Society of Civil Engineers.[

The Frommer’s travel guide describes the Bridge as “possibly the most beautiful, certainly the most photographed, bridge in the world.”

At the time of its opening in 1937, it was both the longest and the tallest suspension bridge in the world, with a main span of 4,200 feet (1,280 m) and a total height of 746 feet (227 m).”

One thing is for certain: building bridges in LEGO is a lot harder than it looks.

I’ve tried to build several small bridges at home because I had the bright idea of building elevated LEGO train tracks with his buildings and cars below. Little Mr had previously been running the trains next to the LEGO road plates but we kept having cars on tracks, trains on road. I thought it would be a space saving idea as well. I failed spectacularly on every attempt to build a decent bridge so I have a very special appreciation for the technical difficulties that need to be overcome to make a structure not only stand, look amazing and be instantly recognisable as the world famous landmark it is, as well.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Himeji_Castle
Wikipedia / Himeji Castle / Japan

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_Gate_Bridge
Wikipedia / Golden Gate Bridge / California / USA

Blog at WordPress.com.