Local Heart, Global Soul

October 3, 2019

Rude Information?

Peeling carrots recently, I came across this little gem. I will leave it to you to decide how to look at it… is this carrot giving me Information? Or representing something more rude? Or a combination of them both…. Rude Information!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

September 29, 2018

Hopefully Back To Former Glory…

Filed under: Uncategorized — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Turning around 180 degrees from the Scott statue in Christchurch, my eyes come to rest on another impressive historic building, and one of the cities oldest. Wikipedia tells me:

Now known as “Our City”, or “Our City O-Tautahi”, registered with the istoric Places Trust, and located at 159 Oxford Terrace, this Heritage New Zealand building in the Queen Anne Style, was built to be the Municipal Chambers but since 1877 has had several changes of use.

From 1887–1924 it was used by Christchurch City Council as their civic offices, providing room for meetings of the council and for housing staff, before they moved to the Civic.

It was then used for many decades by the Canterbury Region Chamber of commerce and served as the main tourist information. These days it is an exhibition and events centre.

The Christchurch Municipal Council first met in 1862. Later that year, it became the Christchurch City Council. The council used Christchurch’s first public building, the Christchurch Land Office, as their meeting venue and for housing council employees.

The Land Office was built in 1851 on Oxford Terrace on the banks of the Avon River, just north of where the Worcester Street bridge crossed the river. The building had various public uses. It was built on Reserve 10, which was a section of land reserved for public buildings.

In 1879, the council administration had run out of room in the Land Office, and a competition for new civic offices and Town Hall was announced. After all the competition entries proved too expensive, the project was abandoned.

Another competition was called for in 1885, this time for just civic offices (i.e. for a council meeting venue and for staff), and on the same site as the Land Office. Controversy erupted when the competition was won by Samuel Hurst Seager,  who was young and relatively inexperienced, and his design in the Queen_Anne style, an architectural type unfamiliar to New Zealand.

The building was completed on 24 March 1887 and council met for the first time in their new premises on 4 April 1887. The south façade of the building has two terracotta sculptures by George Frampton that represent ‘Industry’ and ‘Concord’

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

In 1919, Council concluded that their premises were once again too cramped and started looking for an alternative.

A bill was put to Parliament, seeking permission to extend the building to the north of Reserve 10 on land designated for public gardens or promenades, Instead, Council purchased the burned out shell of the northern half of the Agricultural and Industrial Hall in 1920.

Construction started in 1922, and the new offices, now known as the Civic, opened on 1 September 1924 .

In 2010, council moved into their fifth civic office; to date, the Queen Anne design is the only purpose built civic offices in Christchurch.

Parliament passed a Christchurch Municipal Offices Leasing Act in 1922, which allowed council to lease the building that was situated on Reserve 10.

The Canterbury Chamber of Commerce took the lease and held it until 1987. Part of the building was subleased to the Canterbury Promotion Council, later known as Christchurch and Canterbury Marketing, and they were in the building until October 2000. Part of their function was to provide the main tourist information centre for Christchurch.

On 2 April 1985, the building was registered by the New Zealand Historic Places Trust (now called Heritage New Zealand) as a Category I historic place, and is a feature of the city.”The building was taken over again by the council and opened as an exhibition, event and meeting space for the community in July 2002, branded as Our City O-Tautahi.Damaged in the 2010 Canterbury earthquake and closed with heavy bracing installed around the building. The building is insured for NZ$5.8m, but repair options are in excess of that. One of the options has been estimated at NZ$10.5m

I knew this building when it was a tourist Information site and love the architecture. I realise that restoring it will be quite an undertaking, but hope that one day soon it can be bought back to it’s former glory.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Wikipedia / “Our City” / Heritage Building / Cr. Worcester St & Oxford Terrace / Christchurch / New Zealand
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Our_City,_Christchurch

December 17, 2013

The Mersch Tourist Information Office Certainly Stands Out From The Crowd…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Family Kiwidutch and Singaporean friend “Velveteen” spent the summer of 2012 together squeezing in as many new places and adventures as possible.

In this diary post we have arrived in the town of Mersch and stop by a tall tower that also happens to be the local Tourist Information office.

Situated in a large open square, the kids take the opportunity to run around and let off some steam, whilst Himself checks out the Information Office, Velveteen and I get busy with our camera’s…

We start first with the tower itself: it’s made in four sections decreasing in size as it reaches the top, and is capped by a beautiful onion shaped dome.

There is some ornamental stonework but in general ornamentation is  minimal.

Then as we move around the tower so that we can photograph it better in the strong sunshine, something curious  a short distance away grabs our attention that we decide is too quirky not to investigate…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Down the street is a church…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

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