Local Heart, Global Soul

October 26, 2013

Father And Daughter Lay Side By Side In Resplendent Beauty…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Following my yesterdays post we have arrived at The Church of Our Lady in Bruges, Belgium and are having a look around the Church.

We’ve seen Michelangel’s statue of the Madonna, but that’s not the only beautiful art on display here.

Our attention is drawn to two effigies, one male and one female, and the highly ornate side of the slabs within which they are entombed.

Wikipedia tells me:

In the choir space behind the high altar are the tombs of Charles the Bold, last Valois Duke of Burgundy, and his daughter, the duchess Mary.

The gilded bronze effigies of both father and daughter repose at full length on polished slabs of black stone.

Both are crowned, and Charles is represented in full armour and wearing the decoration of the Order of the Golden Fleece.

All around us we can find beautiful wrought ironwork, gates, the panels, angels, scrolls and flowers.

My Singaporean friend Velveteen and I barely know were to point our camera’s first, it’s a detail fanatic’s delight, and we are both detail fanatics.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph ©Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph ©Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph ©Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph ©Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph ©Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph ©Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph ©Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph ©Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph ©Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph ©Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph ©Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph ©Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph ©Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph ©Velveteen) used with permission

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_of_Our_Lady,_Bruges

August 18, 2013

…Do You Suppose They’d Notice If Their Door Bell Pull Went Missing?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I know, I know,  the detail fanatic in me has resurfaced.

It was going to happen some time or another, after all, the combination of historic stately home, metal and stone work decoration more than hinted that detail would be found lurking somewhere.

As usual for this sort of post it is dual purpose:  I’m using my blog as an archive place to store images that inspire me when I want to draw.

As well as the photos you see here, I do also have backup copies of all my work on a non-public account on Flickr and in two separate external hard disk drives.

The beautiful decorative wrought iron pull for the door bell definitely makes me wonder why on earth we can’t be more creative with this kind of thing these days… I’d love something like this for my door (in miniature somehow, obviously,  as my front door is rather a lot less   absolutely, positively, seriously less grandiose than this one).

Mind you, if this one was going begging I certainly wouldn’t say no either… not that I’d ever consider thieving it, but say there was a fire and everyone else was busy saving the old masters in the portrait gallery,  I could at least do my bit by saving this and keeping it safe for a few hours until the National Trust authorities came to sort out the mess. ( and Yes, I would give it back).. albeit with a parting sigh.

I have a question that maybe  you can help me with:  if decorative wrought iron,wood,  stone, stained glass and the like are considered too “old fashioned” to be put into prominent places in our homes and “modern”public buildings, and IKEA furniture features in an ever-increasing percentage of living rooms in the western world today, why on earth are websites like Pinterest crammed full of images in decorative wrought iron, stone, stained glass etc.  ?

I have a 1930’s house that has all it’s original features and we have a few small IKEA cabinets  (only because it was the only place we could find something the right size to fit the spaces) but nothing in the living area.  Everything else in our home is old, second hand, recycled, upcycled, made in wood by small(er) companies etc. We bought the second hand stuff first because it was all we could afford, we were given several other bits (rescued from the recycling compactor) and much later bought some 60-90 year old pieces that fit well with the features in our home.

Ever clicked on Pinterest and seen pages of IKEA furniture trending as favourites?  No, I don’t think so either. Do people love the “idea” of the “old fashioned” but not actually love it enough to live with it? Seriously, if someone please has an answer to this question, pray tell,  because I don’t understand why so little of this kind of beauty is in evidence in people’s homes today.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Their Front door…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 20, 2012

A Kitchen That Mangles My Heart and Churns My Emotions…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The Kauri Museum in Northland New Zealand is a bit like Dr. Who’s Tardis…  it looks small on the outside but once inside, you keep finding a new bit that extends further and branches off  just around each corner.

Around this corner I discover an entire section devoted to Kauri wood incorporated into kitchen equipment… a topic as a Foodie that is close to my heart.

From butter churns to washing machine mangles, rolling pins to decorative shortbread and butter forms, I’m captivated.

Now there were a few extra non-Kauri items sneaked into the display too… and yes,  those gorgeous cast iron pots and pans had me drooling  just as much as the woodwork items did.

Foodies amongst you will understand the diversion and forgive me for it… the rest of you I will box around the ears with either the Kauri rolling pin or  a cast iron skillet… your choice !

(of course I’m only joking, Family Kiwidutch are not  a hitting family). Once again I find myself sighing wistfully at the beauty of the workmanship of these tactile tools… they were once the hard working workhorses of the “modern” kitchen and how little we appreciate not having to churn our own butter!

(but I bet that butter churn wouldn’t have looked too beautiful to the poor lady of the house who had to labour over it every day… and of course going to the gym was never a necessity for her, since she got more than her fair share of workouts in her house every day just keeping up with the housework).

Let’s take a look around…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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