Local Heart, Global Soul

November 22, 2013

A Mystery And A Church That Towers Above Us…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

In this post about the fortified churches I have tried to solve a mystery and failed.

I often try and use my camera to take “notes” as I travel to help me remember the finer details later when I do further research on a place or area, and when I sort out the photographs to make a blog post or for my private family album.

Therefore it was now my habit to photograph the sign board that denoted the name of the village as we arrived so that later I would remember which fortified church was which.

I know where we had come from and where we were headed, but somehow, despite our best efforts, we still managed to take a few wrong turns and our route wasn’t particularly ergonomic.

It didn’t worry me at the time because I assumed I had town “labels”for all of the churches, but it now appears I missed one. I know from the road signs in the photos I took of it roughly where it “should” be, but a search using Google Earth has not turned up the matches I thought it would, and the route map of the fortified churches didn’t either.  It’s possible this one isn’t really a true fortified church… but I photographed it anyway.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

Therefore whilst this  first church has a “mystery” identity, I do at least know where we were following this one: the village of Jeantes.

The Jeantes church was definitely fortified, and a special bonus, the front door was open. I couldn’t find anyone around to ask permission to take photos inside, so only tried a few shots of the interior from the doorway. Without the flash the photos were hopeless, to say it was dimly lit inside was an understatement, so this was a rare occasion when I resorted to using the flash.

The surrounding buildings in the village also boasted some very unique looking architecture:  towers and distinctive roofs as well as the grand looking archways. The Jeantes church was yet another popular with the birds… who lined up on the highest part of the roof line and flew in sorties to and from it. It’s massive square towers are not well depicted in scale in my photographs here either, you really need to stand next to it and be dwarfed by it to really feel how solid the walls are, and how far it towers above you.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

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