Local Heart, Global Soul

November 30, 2015

The Sands Of Time Tick Back Some 70 Years…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The next section of the Garderen Sand Sculpture exhibition deals with historic events, and there are various informational boards in the Dutch language, the first being:

Liberation 70 years. After nearly five years of occupation by the Germans, the American offensive nicknamed “Operation Market Garden” began on 12th September 1944.

The offensive would go on to liberate North-Braband, Limburg and a part of Gelderland, but stalled at Arnhem.

The Dutch that has not yet been liberated were hit hard by the following “hunger winter” which was a particularly hard winter in the most pressing of times. The second offensive began on 8th February 1945 and was called “Operation Veritable” (also known as the Battle of the Reichswald), an attrition eventually won by the Allies. On 5th May 1945 the Germans capitulated and with the war and oppression over, people broke out in mass celebration.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

This was followed by: “The Lady of Putten. In retaliation for an ambush  of a car carrying two German officers and two corporals by the organised Putten resistance movement, the Germans captured the population of Putten and set one hundred houses on fire during an action that saw six men and a woman shot dead.

Men and women were separated and almost the entire male population of 601 men were transported to the Neuengamme forced labour concentration camp. By the end of the war only 48 men returned.

On 1st October, 1949 , Queen Juliana unveiled a monument that includes a memorial park and a statue  depicting a grieving woman in traditional dress holding a handkerchief in her hand, that has become known as “The Lady of Putten”. The statue is located so that looks toward the Oude Kerk in Putten, from where the men were deported.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Sand Sculpture Garderen / Zandsculpturen Garderen

September 14, 2014

A Short Stop That Is A Tasty Treat…

Filed under: Argalasti,GREECE,PELION PENINSULAR,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Anyone who is a serious foodie will understand my fascination with the beautiful shapes, colours and textures of fresh fruit and veggies.

Back in October 2012  we visited Greece, and on the day we were leaving, our in-laws said that we would be stopping in Argalasti  to visit the local market before we left.

It’s a market that sells clothes and household goods under large shade covers, but all around the perimeter are stalls selling fruit, vegetables and locally made goods like soap, jams, chutneys , soups and pickles.

The temperatures are still very warm, around 26 C but it’s a welcome stop along the way as we stretch our legs and get some fresh air and explore the market.

As usual with thing like fresh peppers grown far away from glasshouses, they not only looked beautiful, they also smelled amazing too.

We are flying back with Ryanair,  an airline that’s tough on excess baggage so selecting a few things to squish into our suitcases has to be dome with care. Luckily our in-laws have spare baggage space because they bought renovation tools from the Netherlands that they are leaving at their holiday home in Platania, on the Pelion peninsular so we can treat ourselves to some home made preserves and locally grown and dried herbs like oregano.  I could of course have browsed for ages but all too soon we are back in our respective cars and winding our way towards Volos.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

March 16, 2014

Nosing Through The Tat And The Treasures…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

There is nothing more relaxing and satisfying than slowly browsing or  rummaging around the myriad of stalls that make up a bric-a-brac or flea market.

In the summer outdoor market along the canals of the inner central city of the Dutch city of Delft, there are many typically Dutch items to be found so visiting Singaporean friend “Velvetine” could get a few history and cultural lessons from me as we browsed the stalls.

This is Delft so naturally there are painted tiles and plates, most of these are of the transfer printed type but if you are very very lucky you might find a  hand painted example for sale too.

My experience is that because this market is well known and attracts many visiting tourists, the prices are often at the higher end of you you could expect to be paying: there are better bargains to be had at lesser known, smaller places, but these places take time to get to and usually have a smaller selection so it’s a case of being lucky and being in the right place at the right time. Sadly there is another aspect to these little out of the way places too, it’s an annoying fact that even though I was born Dutch, speak Dutch and am as good at driving a hard bargain as any of my fellow Dutch,  I was not born here and English is my first language so I of course speak Dutch with an accent.

If I go to bargain in a pokey little out-of-the way second hand shop, my accent will give me away as a foreigner and the price of the piece adjusted upwards during the bargaining process accordingly. As a result, when hunting down some old  antique wardrobes some years ago, I “scouted” the places that had the pieces we required and when I found the ones I wanted, got Himself, a born and bred Dutchman to come back later and do the bargaining.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Markets like the ones at Delft are aimed mostly at the tourist customer,  you will have to weigh up the fact that you are probably not getting a genuine bargain, but on the other hand it’s still cheaper than  internet shopping and paying postage. In the end if you love the piece you are buying then that also counts for a lot, if you walk away with a piece that will give you pleasure for years to come, or which is a rare addition to a collection you already have then maybe price becomes less relevant.

Most important to remember of all,  is that no matter what price the vendor gives you, some bargaining is acceptable so learn to pull a few faces of pain and a friendly grin when being given the first price and at least ask for a cheeky discount, and than offer a figure somewhere half way between the vendors original price and your cheeky offer. Often this “compromise” will be met with a shrug, a smile and an “OK then… just for you…”  so you can at least get some discount. The adage “the early bird gets the worm” is also true at markets like this:  the good stuff often disappears quickly so if you know that you want to look around this kind of market, get up early and be one of the first customers as the vendors are unpacking.

It’s a risk getting a bargain at the end of the day but I’ve managed it a few times, for example once for a large old wooden deed box for which I convinced a vendor that if he gave me a decent discount he would not have the hassle of trying to get back into his tiny van, storing and lugging around to the next market. If you use charm, are friendly and twist their arms you might get lucky, on that particular day I pitched a very cheeky low offer after at least five minutes of chat and to my surprise it was accepted.

You never know what might turn up at places like these, the looking  around, some friendly banter with the vendors is half the fun and that’s the whole point of enjoying a stroll whilst nosing through the tat and the treasures.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

January 11, 2014

You Too Can Have Christmas In August!

Filed under: Funny,GERMANY,Monschau,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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This retrospective blog post finds us in the German town of Monschau, and whilst I learned that it was one of many German towns famous for it’s annual December Christmas Markets, I had no idea that some of the “Christmas” shops are open all year around. I didn’t go inside, firstly becuase I didn’t want the kids to start begging me for a ton of stuff that we either didn’t want, didn’t need or have any space to take home and secondly because it was so crowded inside I descided not to try and go for a peek there on cruches.  From the doorway it looked like the place was packed rather tight with merchandise and what ever space was over was taken up by browsing (or maybe buying) tourists.  So… here’s something totally unexpected:  Complete with Santa on a chair outside: all things “Christmas” in the heat of August!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

December 27, 2013

The Second Market Is Quite Literally Buzzing…

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

We are about to leave Vianden Castle in Vianden, Luxembourg.

Downstairs in one of the lower galleries (or Great Halls, or whatever they all it) is another market, this time of hand-made jewellery, medieval costumes, wood and leather work, local and regional produce.

Some of the vendors were packing up and I was fast reaching maximum pain tolerance after all this walking around the castle this afternoon, so I’ll be honest and admit that I only photographed some of the stalls closest to us.

One of these was a source of fascination to all of us because a lady selling honey and honey related products also had a section of a hive in a box with a clear perspex side wall and there were live bees inside it.

I’m severly allergic to both bees and wasps and so usually the only bee-line I ever make is in the opposite direction of the little beasts, so this provided an excellent opportunity for me to actually see some hive activity up close.

Behind the clear screen the little worker bees were in constant busy motion, and whilst in the low light their movement was hard to photograph, it was amazing to see how intricate and organised the work seemed to be.

After a good chat with the honey lady, we were then attracted to a stall that sold medieval costumes. As I mentioned in an earlier post we bought a simple knight’s tunic for Little Mr. which he was so delighted with that he immediately put it on and in his imagination was instantly transformed into a full blown knight.

He would have slept in it that night too but I was the mean Mama who said “No… let’s save it to wear again tomorrow instead” which once he got over his indignation of not being able to sleep in it, ended up being the next best thing.

He wore it for days afterwards, and at home, and eventually for a special event at school too.

Velvetine fell in love with a medieval gown, it had huge quirky medieval sleeves, but the reality of finding somewhere suitable to wear such a heavy garment in tropical Singapore plus the space such a big dress would take in her suitcase meant that we took photographs, dreamed about it but reluctantly left it behind. Soon we had to leave the castle behind too… so we slowly make our way back into to town of Vianden.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

December 24, 2013

Eyeing Up The Beautiful Brews…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The 2013  Medieval Festival taking place in Vianden Castle in Luxembourg is in full swing.

Family Kiwidutch and visiting Singaporean friend “Velvetine” have arrived late to the party, but there is still time to take a look around and join in.In an inner courtyard there is an outdoor market taking place and naturally we stop at a few stalls that catch our eye.

I’m not drinking alcohol because of my  pain medication but even just the beautiful bottles containing the wines and liquors on this stall are appealing to the eye.

The vendors were friendly and chatty which was good because we had plenty of questions and Velvetine and Himself even managed several taste tests of some of the more unusual brews before deciding on a few purchases.

Velvetine loved the little toy hedgehogs at one stall, Little Mr coveted bows and arrows from another (“No”!) but gains a medieval knights vest that he can reuse at an upcoming school play. It was late afternoon and some of the stall owners were already packing up so we could have seen far more if we had been lucky enough to have arrived earlier. Still, you can’t have everything when you stumble upon things without planning.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

October 21, 2013

The Weather Is Glorious, But Kiwi Daughter Is Thunderous…

Filed under: BELGIUM,Bruges,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

This page of my diary finds me in Bruges, Belgium and is a journal of our travels last summer.

We now walk for lunch and a well earned rest  to the Bruges  market square and Gementehuis  (City Hall). Again the area is thronged with tourists, horses and carriages plod by  regularly, but we are pleased to be here on a market day, so browse the stall under the deep shade canopies.

We find some steps to sit on in the shade with a bag of fresh cherries and strawberries and sit people watching as we eat.

Himself and Little Mr  went off earlier to do some other things and to catch an extra dip in the pool, Kiwi Daughter isn’t in a good mood after opting to stay with Velvetine and I at The Chocolate Line shop and then later wishing she’d opted for the pool option instead.

She’s got her nose out of joint that we won’t now take time out to walk to the other side of the central city to deliver her back to the hotel, and I’m annoyed because I want her to realise that once you make a decision you should live with the consequences and not expect everyone else to change their plans to accommodate your  change of heart. I also want her to accept that then turning on a tantrum and trying to ruin my day definitely isn’t the way to get me to change my mind either. Velveteen tries to talk sense to her and also fails, we try phoning Himself but he’s not at all pleased at the prospect of  dragging Little Mr away from his swim just to please Kiwi Daughter so he declines to come to us (and fair enough too, I totally agree with him).

It’s a physical impossibility for me to manage a back-and-forth to the hotel and back so Kiwi  Daughter will just have to suck it up on this occasion. She’s not doing that particularly well so this day is turning out to be not such an easy one. As a consequence the photos we took around the Bruges market square and Gementehuis  were a bit rushed. We were distracted and a little too tired and hungry. A rest was certainly in order and after some stern words, a few tears (mine and hers) and a good sit down, she and I calmed down and got ready to go where Velvetine and I wanted to go next.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

July 20, 2013

Belgium: Finding a Wall of Chickens but No Waffles…

Filed under: Belgian Cuisine,BELGIUM,Lochristi,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Welcome to my retrospective posts about our Summer adventures.

It’s August 2012 and we’ve just bundled our rather jet-lagged friend  “Velvetinenut”  into our rented van and whisked her to over the border to Belgium… after an hour or two dozing in the back with pillows she’s refreshed and rearing to go and since we made an early start kids everyone is now whineing  expressing wishes for food.

We turn off the motorway and take a few smaller roads but apparently not much is open in Belgium villages on a hot sleepy August morning.

We enjoy the scenery and several villages later find ourselves in the slightly larger town of Lochristi.

In deep contrast to the small villages around it, Lochristi  is a hive of activity and the main reason is soon apparent as we progress down the main street to find market stalls set up on the footpaths.

Himself drops us off so we can browse whilst he finds a parking spot and my kids find themselves dragged past the stalls of  cheap plastic toys by the two fanatical foodie friends who are making a bee-line for the food trailers instead.  (yeah kids, sorry it’s a tough life).

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

There’s a particularly interesting cheese stall and when I ask about local speciality cheeses, I’m surprised at just how many there are.

There’s a good queue of locals (always a good sign) which we join and of course we end up buying a few more cheeses than we intended but they turn out to be fabulous, so worth it.

There”s an amazing rotisserie trailer where an entire side is filled with gently rotating roasting chickens, at the bottom there are golden roasted potatoes that look scrumptious  but we didn’t end up getting any because the queue here by the counter was about ten deep.

I only got a great photo of the rotisserie because it was throwing out a small wall of heat and since the day was already heading for 30C  (86 F)  people were wisely queueing on the “cool” side to the left of the counter. Velvetine said that since Belgium is famous for it’s waffles, and we are here in Belgium she would love to try a waffle if she can.

I ask directions to possible places we might get a waffle and we visit several cafés with no luck, but they are friendly and helpful and write down the name of a place further down the street that they think might have some for us to try. The search for a bona fide fresh Belgium Waffle is on…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Velvetinenut) posted with permission

(photograph © Velvetinenut) posted with permission

(photograph © Velvetinenut) posted with permission

(photograph © Velvetinenut) posted with permission

(photograph © Velvetinenut) posted with permission

(photograph © Velvetinenut) posted with permission

(photograph © Velvetinenut) posted with permission

(photograph © Velvetinenut) posted with permission

(photograph © Velvetinenut) posted with permission

(photograph © Velvetinenut) posted with permission

(photograph © Velvetinenut) posted with permission

February 18, 2013

Society Took the Farm, and Farmed it Out…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

This is another post in my series about historical Den Haag (The Hague). Every city grows and changes over time, but some specific areas grow and change more than others.

When the Haags Gemeentearchief  (the Hague City Council Archive) put up billboards around the city  to celebrate their 125th Anniversary a few years ago and Himself and I made it my mission to try and photograph them all.

The Gemeente (Council) placed the billboards as close as possible to where the photos had been originally taken and they made a page on their website (Dutch language only) that showed where their physical locations were etc.

Sadly both the website and the billboards were removed afterwards and so I was delighted that we managed to photograph almost every one of them with not just the “old” views that were already displayed on the billboards, but also my own photos of the areas surrounding the billboards as they look today.

This particular photograph is captioned: “Uitzicht van Monnickendamplein 17 ” (View from Monnickendamplein 17) and shows the market garden / glass houses that apparently this area was well known for as they were in 1939.

Himself told me that he seemed to remember a few open spaces that featured gardening still in the district when he was a kid, but those have long since been built on, as various apartment blocks dating from the 1970’s and 1980’s will attest.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I tried to find some historical facts from the Hague city Archive, but since this area mostly consisted of glass houses (as opposed to old established buildings) there was no information to be found.

Granted I spent hours looking and not days, but at least I tried.

This is  one of the billboards where, if someone who lived the area in 1939 could step directly into 2013, they would get the shock of their lives.

So much has changed, and the food, instead of coming from a market garden or greenhouse a block away, now comes from supermarkets like the Albert Hein (AH) on the other side of the road.

The land of course rose acutely in value as new houses were needed, farmland and it’s earnings could not compete with the return value of residential land,  (market forces and all that)   … it’s fate was sealed.

Society took the farm, and farmed it out to way beyond the city limits.  How little our food used to travel, and how much further it has to now. They call this progress… but I’m not so very certain that it really is.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 10, 2013

Bric-a-Brac on an Industrial Scale (…or at Least on an Industrial Site)

Filed under: AMSTERDAM,PHOTOGRAPHY,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

We’ve finished looking around Schipol and headed to Amsterdam for our next appointment.

We’ve arrived too early though and thought it would be OK  because surely we could just have a cup of coffee before our appointment but no… the place we want to go to is closed until the appointed time so now we are standing outside in a freezing wind on an industrial estate in a city we are not particularly familiar with, wondering what to do with ourselves for an hour and a quarter.

We are right next to a ferry dock that could take us over the water to Amsterdam’s Central Station, and our first idea was to just go for a jaunt to kill the time but then we discover that the ferry sailings are only every half hour and since our next appointment involves a boat, we are somewhat worried that  if we missed the connection back that we would miss our appointment.

Then we notice that people coming to catch the ferry are all streaming in in one direction and that many of them are carrying bags, bric-a-brac and various items that vary between antique and junk.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Clearly there’s some sort of market going on close by so we decide to investigate. We following the crowds and discover a flea market literally just around the corner. Several massive old industrial buildings are being used to house most of it it, although there are a few hardy souls with stalls set up outside in the cold.

The first building is labelled on each wall respectively in both English and Dutch “Netherlands Shipbuilding Company” and it all looks interesting (and we have nothing better to do for the next hour than stand in the cold) so we decide to gamble on getting our money’s worth of entertainment, pay the entrance fee and go inside.

There are rows and  rows of stalls, lots of clothes,  and everything from new hand made jewellery to antiques of various quality. There are treasures and tat, books, old toys and even someone selling vintage wooden crates (doing a roaring trade too if all the people we saw carting them out were anything to go by).

We all walk at various speeds and have different interests so we split up and agree to meet by the entrance at a set time.   Yes, I bought something… but more about that in a future post, it was mostly just fun to look around at all the weird and wonderful things on offer.

I actually find the architecture of the building as interesting as the stuff on the stalls. In the Netherlands you need to licence from the city council to sell items like this on very day of the year except Queen’s Day so we don’t see flea markets very often. I asked one vendor about this place and apparently it’s on one weekend every month, so it’s sheer luck that it’s on whilst we were here. Let’s look around…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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