Local Heart, Global Soul

January 9, 2018

A “Moster Mill”, A Misleading Name Of Sorts…

Filed under: Historical,Monster,PHOTOGRAPHY,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Seriously, you’d think I could have organised my WordPress Schedule better: I’ve made two posts with tomorrows date (again)… sincere apologies for my incompetence. Pain medication messes with your brain. … or in my case.. What brain???

Early in February 2017 Family Kiwidutch had some visitors from the United Kingdom, two ladies we know who are Kiribati nationals and friends of others from Kiribati we have already good contact with.

After extended times at home catching up, cooking and eating far more than we should have, from the moment they arrived on the Friday afternoon, until Saturday evening, we decided to go out for a small tour on the Sunday.

Since they are only over for the weekend we couldn’t go far, do drove up the coast, passing through the small village of Monster.

The name “Monster” comes from the name of a Monastery that was located here centuries ago and there is a windmill of the same age there.

Our family passed by this “molen” (mill) many times before but usually it’s closed, so when we saw that it was open to the public we found a parking spot and decided to take a closer look.

The mill is called “de Vier Winden” (the Four Winds) and according to a brochure I found inside (Dutch language only) there has been a mill on this spot since 1311. This latest edition is fairly recent: a rebuilding that took place in 1882 after a fire razed the previous one to the ground in 1881. Mill fires seem to have been a common occurrence since there was so much wood in the inner construction. The name of the mill is spelt out in the bricks around the base, and our visitors are enthusiastic to see inside…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The weather gets decidedly stormy and the volunteers who look after the mill stop the sails from turning with special brakes and anchor them into a “resting” position so that the sails and machinery do not get damaged.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 20, 2015

Clues In The Mill Walls, If Only I Hadn’t Missed Them…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Following yesterday’s post, Himself and I have a few hours between out Nijmegen hospital appointments and decided to get some fresh air and sunshine.

It was late October 2014 and the days before had been rainy and gray, so having the opportunity to enjoy some sunshine was too good to pass up.

I’m not a natural city slicker and despite being largely brought up in cities, nor is Himself.

We both love the peace and quiet of country life and if there had been suitable work  and the cards had fallen differently then our living arrangement and lifestyle might have been very different.

Like most people we are tied to where the work is, and now that I am less mobile and tied to multiple hospital appointments it’s probably better that things worked out the way they did. I didn’t at first catch the name of the village we have arrived at, it didn’t matter, we just saw a little lane leading to an interesting looking tower and drove down to take a closer look.

Closer inspection shows that this is the remains of an old molen (mill), the kind used to grind grain for flour and it’s location on the edge of the village is perfect, not too far for the baker or locals to come and collect their flour, and also there seems to be some sort of fortification here too.

But first the tower itself has my complete and utter attention. Detail… enough to drool over. Worked into the brickwork is a windmill motif… and around the tower there are various letters. I can make out “G” in upper case and “S and d ” in lower case, and then what could either be “50” or “SO” under the window towards the door.

Annoyingly I only initially saw two letters and assumed that they were the initials of the family who built the mill, it was only later when I looked at photographs on the computer that I realise that there were more letters (or numbers) under the windows… and that I hasn’t photographed all of the windows to get them all. The little triangular windows look like eyes looking down on us, the zig-zag brickwork below the roof section is beautiful and the style and pattern of the  roof is a pattern lovers dream. I love how they have recycled one of the millstones into a large door step too…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

March 31, 2015

A Lightening Strike Look Into The Past…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Today’s post is another billboard from a series that the Gemeente Den Haag (The Hague City Council) placed around the city as part of their celebration of one hundred years anniversary of the Gemeente archive department.

This one is situated on the outer edge of the Hague, so as might be expected the “before” photograph taken in 1916 is very rural.

These days it’s a new-ish subdivision where the modern houses have been built around a few of the older homes and farms in the area.

The text on the billboard reads “Tomatenlaan hoek Oosteinde, molen van de Wippolder, circa 1910. De molen brandde in 1916 af als gevolg van blikseminslag. Verzameling Vereniging De HollandscheMolen, Amsterdam” …

…which translates as ” Tomatenlaan corner Oosteinde, (wind) mill from the Wippolder, around 1910. The mill burnt down in 1916 after being struck by lightening. From the collection of the foundation of Dutch (wind) mills,  Amsterdam.”

The gemeente website section that featured the billboards (which has since been removed for some reason) only had images of the photographs on the billboards but not of the present day.

Himself and I decided to visit each billboard and capture the present day views, this is therefore the “old” and “new” alongside one another so that you can see how much, or how little things have changed.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The view in the opposite direction…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

 

March 2, 2014

History And The Changing Times Have Dying Occupations Over a Barrel…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

It gives me great sadness when I discover the death of an occupation. A craft, a set of specialised skills, a trade that was often passed down from Father to Son, gone, leaving behind a long history of hard work forged in fire and with wood.

Such is the case of cooperage at Zaans Schans. Coopers make wooden barrels, barrels that were used in days gone by for the transport and storage of all sorts of goods both locally and worldwide.

Whilst barrels rolled well on stone quays and streets in the centuries before and just after the Industrial Revolution, their round forms did not make for the the most ergonomic shape when filling ships holds and the invention of the shipping container was the one of the many contributors to the death knells of the cooperage industry.

In the case of  Zaans Schans I find a little building that houses the full workings of a cooperage intact. From the information boards I learn:

In the building you see the interior from the barrels and cooperage trade SR Tiemstra Oostzanerwerf & Sons. On the death of the last cooper, Jaap Tiemstra in 1999, he left behind a completely intact cooperage. It’s intriguing to see not just how the craft of the cooper  was put together, but to also catch a breath of the spirit of the cooper in the interior.

Cooperage Tiemstra was established in 1919 by Jaaps’  father Simon Tiemstra. Jaap ran the company together with his brother until 1987. This coopery was a so-called “wet coopery” which means that they made containers for wet goods such as herring, beer and other liquors. After the nineteen fifties demand fell considerably for wooden barrels.

It’s not just the making of barrels that have become a dying trade. so too slowly but surely have the canalside saw-mills once littered the banks of Dutch canals.

Powered by the wind energy of the wind mills above the wood milling buildings these mills were one of the main reasons for centuries of Dutch supremacy at sea, sailing ships could be quickly built and repaired both in times of war and peace because the wind automated much of the milling process that other nations were still carrying out by hand.

The Dutch rather literally made the wind into their economic power-house and the wood produced was used in the building all matter of things , not least  ships, barges and barrels.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Some information referring to an antique photograph tells me: ” Schuitenmakerij Brouwer:  This work shed originally belonged to the ship-maker company Widow K. Brouwer located at the Rustenburg in Zaandam.

In 1964 the shed was to have been demolished in favour of the building if the new headquarters of Albert Heijn Supermarkets.

In 1967 the  shed was rebuilt at  Zaanse Schans. The original shipyard was founded in 1857 by Klaas Brouwer.

After Worlds War I the company specialised in the construction of barges.

At that time  there were still a great number of wind-sawmills, and timber merchants established in the Westzijderveld.

Almost all the timber shipped in at the harbour of Zaandam was bought to the processors and merchants by  hundreds of barges. Of course, as evidenced by one of my blog posts a few days ago,  barge traffic is still very big business on Dutch waterways,  especially for raw materials , so the industry itself didn’t disappear but it  is true that it is no longer visible in it’s old state either: The many hundreds of old wooden barges have been replaced with fewer but far larger vessels, steel giants that transport tonnages that their old wooden forbearers could only have dreamt about.

Keep Up, Change or Die… the mantra of trade and industry throughout the ages. Sometimes we inevitably hold ourselves over a barrel.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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