Local Heart, Global Soul

April 12, 2017

English: We Shall Fight On The Beaches!… Opps, But Not Ours!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Arriving in the entrance hall of Fort Kijkduin, located close to Den Helder in the Netherlands, visitor attention is immediately caught by a large exhibit.

It depicts the landing battle between the English and (Napoleon’s)French on the beaches here. An information board translates as:

The early morning landing from 27 August 1799.

The English ships produce such heavy fire that the Bataafse army could not prevent the enemy from coming ashore.

Even worse, both of the rifle battalions (green uniforms) had to retreat to the hamlet of Groote Keeten.

Additionally, the second Battalion of the 5th Half Brigade (Blue and white uniforms) was forced to retreat to the Koegras.

The losses from the Bataafse side: approximately 1400 men.
The losses from the English side:approximately 500 men.

As a result of this landing Napoleon ordered the buildings of fortifications in Den Helder, including this fort.”

The little model figures and boats depict the battle, but are safely under a protective cover, away from inquisitive little fingers.This is how, as soon as we get in the door, we find the reason that this fort was built…  and since starting at the beginning is  very good idea, so in we go!


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Den Helder: Fort Kijkduin / The Netherlands

June 17, 2016

Worth Zooming In For….

Yesterday’s post, with the amazing portrait of Napoleon, had of course, many stunning elements of detail. Since I had too many photographs for one blog post yesterday, I put some of the detail photographs into an overflow post today.. enjoy!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Amsterdam: Rijksmuseum

June 16, 2016

One Napoleon A King, Another Napoleon An Emperor…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Of course I should have realised that the large painting in my yesterday’s post probably had the Battle of Waterloo as it’s subject matter.

Further on I find another information panel, plus the main one that I should probably have found earlier when I entered this  Rijksmuseum gallery.

1815: Waterloo and William I
Those born in the Netherlands in 1800 would  have experienced many political upheavals during their lifetime.

In 1806 the French emperor Napoleon transformed the Batavian Republic into the Kingdom of Holland, with his brother Louis Napoleon as king.

In 1810 Napoleon took personal charge of the Netherlands, which he made a department of  France. When the French were driven from the Netherlands in 1813 the House of Orange returned to power.

At the battle of Waterloo in 1815, the northern and southern  Netherlands were combined into a single kingdom, under King William I.  This was not  lasting union, however, for the southern provinces seceded in 1830 and formed the Kingdom of Belgium.
Both Louis Napoleon and William I felt it important for their subjects to identify themselves primarily as Netherlanders, rather than as citizen of , say Amsterdam or Limburg.

Their efforts to create a greater sense of national unity included focusing attention on national history and culture. In 1820 the same standardised units of measurement – the metre, the kilogram and the litre, were introduced throughout the realm.

Portrait of Emperor Napoleon I“, Oil on canvas Paris 1805-1815, from the studio of Francois Pascal Simon, Baron Gerard (1770-1837)
On 02 December 1804 the Corsican-born general Napoleon proclaimed himself Emperor of France. State portrait, such as this painting, were distributed throughout the land. The ermine mantle, staff and throne manifest the power of the Emperor.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 Amsterdam: Rijksmuseum

 

 

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