Local Heart, Global Soul

March 29, 2019

Marveling At Old Masters…

More paintings at the Mauritshuis, these old masters get more amazing the more you look at them. Painting black detail and textures on a black garment? Rubens makes it look easy…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(Above  and Below) Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640) “Portrait of a Man, possibly Peter van Hecke (1591-1645)” painted circa 1630.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640) “Portrait of a Woman, possibly Clara Fourment (1593-1643)” painted circa 1630.

Visitors can loan an audio set to explain many of the paintings…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Amazing painting when seen up close, even the detail inside the back clothing, not to mention the feather…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(Below) Anthony van Dyck (1599-1641) “Portrait of Quintijn Symons (1592- after 1646) painted circa 1634-1635.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

March 19, 2014

My Luxury Is The One The Others Missed…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Regular readers of this blog will know that I like quirky stuff, I like weird and mundane things like the decorations on manhole covers, letter boxes or windows.

I also like bricks, cobbles and patterns found beneath my feet, over my head or anywhere I can stretch to see them.

At first I was hesitant to post this kind of post, after all surely my obsession with manhole cover and drain grates was a unique one and readers would be left scratching their heads and saying “well there is this blogger… most of the time she appears normal  enough but once in a while we have our doubts because she has some rather strange obsessions…”

Oddly enough I am not the only soul on the planet who finds a pattern in a humble street stone fascinating.

There’s the added  aspect too, that three years on crutches has me cautiously watching where I walk to the point of obsession, lest I take a tumble and add yet more physical damage to an already long list.

It should not surprise you that during the summer of 2012 I watched people walk around Delft completely oblivious to a few small but delightful details  beneath their feet.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

These details come in two basic forms:  the first in the area of th  “Oude Kerk ” (Old  Church) is in the form of a small brass domed “button”  placed in the bricks, they all have  a simple graphic of a church on them and they are spaced a short distance apart.

Together they form an outline but less certain is what that outline represents: the site of a previous building? ( I’m sort of guessing not though, since the present church is the larger replacement of a smaller previous one).

My best guess would be that it maybe represents the boundary of the Church property?Maybe it’s a subtle route marker for a tourist walking tour?  …or of course something else completely because I’m plucking ideas from thin air.

The other form of little detail can be found around the central city canal streets where the flea market takes place. Every now and again a street stone has been removed and in it’s place is a small rectangular tile, in blue and white appropriately enough, with words relating to the earth in several languages. Again, I don’t see any of the tourists or locals even noticing them… but of course, unlike me they are also not obsessed with making certain that every step is a safe one. They have the luxury of walking without thinking,  I on the other hand have the luxury of finding detail that they have missed…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

March 10, 2014

Checking Out The Less Wobbly Bits…

Filed under: DELFT,Historical,PHOTOGRAPHY,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The Dutch version of  the Leaning Tower is the “Oude Kerk” (Old Church) in Delft.

It leans almost two metres off centre and has been the subject of many a wary eye of person as they pass by.

So far the seventy-five metre tower has stood without problem since the 1300’s and since the lean stays the same over the centuries it will probably stay in it’s leaning state for many centuries more.

Of course it’s not just the tower that makes the church, the knave and the apse is naturally there too… so this post details the “rest” of this beautiful gothic church.

The church’s website tells us:  “The first stained glass window was installed in the Old Church in 1406, and more were added in the same century.

But the city fire of 1536 and the Delft Thunderclap of 1654 (a gunpowder explosion) unfortunately destroyed them all.

Plain glass replaced the originals, and it was not until the 20th century that new stained glass windows were installed, one by one.

The church now features 27 of them, each telling their own story. This distinctive collection is regarded as the crowning achievement of the renowned glazier Joep Nicolas.

The windows of the Old Church are extremely colourful, featuring ochre yellows, heavenly blues, deep reds and dark greens. Most of them depict Biblical stories, such as the Parable of the Prodigal Son, and the story of baby Moses.

But there are also a number of interesting memorial windows, such as the Liberation window and the Wilhelmina window.”

I haven’t managed to go inside the church to see the windows yet, but can at least admire the architcture. It’s on my “to do” list to come back one day and admire the treasures on the inside,  and that this “church on a lean” will still be it’s usual wobbly self when I return.  For now I am content to concentrate on the outside and to enjoy the intricate combinations of stonework, brick and windows.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

October 18, 2013

Thousands Of Old Buildings, Hundreds Of Beautiful Ones…

Filed under: BELGIUM,Bruges — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

Another page from my last summer’s diary as Family Kiwidutch and visiting Singaporean friend “Velveteen”cram in as many adventures together as possible.

In this diary page I’m going to show you why central Brugge (a.k.a. Bruges) is such a tourist magnet: the entire city centre is brimming with antique olde worlde charm. Of course it’s all very kitch and over the top.

For example there are troupes of horse drawn carriages full of tourists clop,clop, clopping past us on the cobbled streets every few minutes, almost no matter which part of the central city we are in, but when it comes down to it the carriages just all part of the Bruges experience. There are old buildings by the thousands, beautiful ones by the hundreds, so avoiding tripping over tourists who stop suddenly in front of you so that they can take their next photograph is also a hazard to be aware of, but having said that I’ll have to admit  Velveteen and I were “that” tourist  fairly often too!

We were here over several days and were treated to extremes of the weather as we were drenched in the hosing down rain or bathed in brilliant sunshine in turn, so our joint photos show the typical fickleness of a northern European summer too.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

(photograph © Velveteen) used with permission

September 12, 2013

A Nine Hundred Year Old Building Keeps The Renovators Busy…

Filed under: Canterbury Cathedral,ENGLAND,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Canterbury Cathedral is an magnificent building and impossible to do justice to in a single photograph.

When we visited it was being renovated (probably a constant process in a building that’s nine hundred years old) so Velvetine and I did our best to capture it’s glory between the limits of our cameras and the fickleness of the weather.

The Cathedral’s website tells me:

St Augustine, the first Archbishop of Canterbury, arrived on the coast of Kent as a missionary to England in 597 AD. He came from Rome, sent by Pope Gregory the Great. It is said that Gregory had been struck by the beauty of Angle slaves he saw for sale in the city market and despatched Augustine and some monks to convert them to Christianity. 

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Augustine was given a church at Canterbury (St Martin’s, after St Martin of Tours, still standing today) by the local King, Ethelbert whose Queen, Bertha, a French Princess, was already a Christian. 

This building had been a place of worship during the Roman occupation of Britain and is the oldest church in England still in use. 

Augustine had been consecrated a bishop in France and was later made an archbishop by the Pope.

He established his seat within the Roman city walls (the word cathedral is derived from the the Latin word for a chair ‘cathedra’, which is itself taken from the Greek ‘kathedra’ meaning seat.) and built the first cathedral there, becoming the first Archbishop of Canterbury.

Since that time, there has been a community around the Cathedral offering daily prayer to God; this community is arguably the oldest organisation in the English speaking world.

The present Archbishop, The Most Revd Justin Welby, is 105th in the line of succession from Augustine.

Until the 10th century the Cathedral community lived as the household of the Archbishop. During the 10th century, it became a formal community of Benedictine monks, which continued until the monastery was dissolved by King Henry VIII in 1540.

Augustine’s original building lies beneath the floor of the nave– it was extensively rebuilt and enlarged by the Saxons, and the Cathedral was rebuilt completely by the Normans in 1070 following a major fire.

There have been many additions to the building over the last nine hundred years, but parts of the quire and some of the windows and their stained glass date from the 12th century.

By 1077, Archbishop Lanfranc had rebuilt it as a Norman church, described as “nearly perfect”. A staircase and parts of the North Wall – in the area of the North West transept also called the Martyrdom – remain from that building.

http://canterbury-cathedral.org/conservation/history/

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

August 21, 2013

We Even Managed to Keep Our Itching Fingers OFF!!!

Filed under: Audley End House,ENGLAND,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Last summer we scooped up our visiting Singaporean friend “Velvetine” and took her on a condensed tour of as many places as we could squeeze  during her three week stay.

We reckoned she could catch up on sleep on the fourteen hour flight home, so whilst she was with us we laughed and explored new places galore.

We had been recommended a visit to Audley End House,  located close to the town of Saffron Walden, and have be delighting in our visit.

“Velvetine” and I, as keen Foodies have been very well behaved in the Audley House kitchen, keeping our fingers on the shutter buttons of our camera’s and managing to refrain from running them over every delicious item of kitchen equipment we are drooling over.

Naturally there were many items to zoom in on,  and the detail fanatic enjoyed every new discovery. There were things like wooden pork pie mallets, where the pastry is shaped and built up around the tubular base,  There were the things I assumed were tiny copper omelette pans hanging from hooks by the jelly moulds, but I realised later that these weren’t omelette pans, they were the lids to some of the pots on the shelves above.

There were little pie and biscuit (cookie) moulds and an old fashioned wooden sieve, the basket of the sieve was in two halves with the soft thin mesh sieve rolled and fastened between the two halves… there was a heavy duty cast iron grinder for coffee, spices or maybe meat… so many things to catch a culinary eye.

In stark contrast with many a modern day kitchen, the lack of plastic here is noticeable… wood, copper, cast iron, porcelain and metal were king of this kitchen in it’s day. Personally I’m a woman who could care less for shoes and handbags,  but I could drool over kitchen equipment like this all day long!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The sieve…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(The eggs are plastic!)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Wooden mallets for making pastry pies…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Any clues what two wooden triangle forms are for? My guess would be for cutting croissant dough?…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Not the omelette pan I first thought it was…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The apples were not plastic…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Pastry brush and… a docker maybe?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

May 30, 2013

Er…I’ve Temporarily Run Out of Funds, So my Building Will Get Finished in 400 Years….

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

During my recent trips to Mechelen, one in fine weather and one in foul,  I still tried to investigate as much of the city centre as I could even in the rain.

Opposite the main entrance of the Cathedral (on the side away from the Square) I find several beautiful buildings that caught my eye and later, on the trip in fine weather  in a little side street

I found a stunning wooden door, massive in size and character.

At one end of the Grote Markt square there are a group of buildings, the largest of which of course is the Cathedral, at the other end there is a beautiful building that upon enquiry turns out to be the Stadhuis (City Council / City Hall).

I searched for some more information about this striking Hall of Mechelen and found some interesting information on Wikipedia (in the Dutch language only) so I’ve translated the most interesting bits into English.

“The town hall of Mechelen started out as Old Hall with Belfry and is located on the east side of the Main Market Mechelen and consists of the Palace of the Grand Council, the belfry and the Cloth Hall. Since 1914 the complex has been used as a city hall.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Palace of the Grand Council was built in 1526 by Rombout II Keldermans to accommodate the Great Council of Malines.

Financial problems prevented work progressing past the ground level and the building was left unfinished for nearly 400 years.

Between 1900-1911, led by architects Van Boxmeer and Langrock the building was completed according to the original 16th-century plans and it therefore decorated in neo-Gothic style.

The belfry is on the list of the UNESCO World Heritage Site along with the other Belfries of Belgium and France.

It’s in the Gothic style from the 14th century but also contains several baroque elements from the 17th century.
The central tower section was never fully completed as planned. A later addition to the building was demolished in 1526 to the north so that there was enough space to construct the Palace of the Grand Council building. The Cloth Hall was built built in the 14th century and was used to trade in textile products. In 1342 it was extensively damaged by during a fire and later drastically remodeled.”

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stadhuis_van_Mechelen (Dutch language only)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

September 30, 2012

Attending the Funeral of a Building I loved…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

My New Zealand Driving Licence is about to expire so  we came to Sydenham to the Automobile Association to renew it.

Unfortunately I need a copy of our city council rate payments, or bank statement etc as proof that I am still eligible for my licence and since we own property in Christchurch providing the required documents aren’t a problem, if only we had remembered to bring said documentation with us.

On the first occasion we didn’t have time to go back to the north side of the city to retrieve the paperwork because we  had a lunch appointment to go to in Hoon Hay,  but I noticed the Old Sydenham Post Office in a very sorry state and quickly snapped a few photographs as we went by.

I’m devastated to see it so broken and damaged, and  hope that the bracing I’m seeing means that a repair might be possible,but when I look at the photographs on the computer that evening, I notice that the roof tiles have all been removed… and get an ominous feeling that that’s not a good sign.

The Old Sydenham Post Office is a  well known and loved landmark,  a beautiful historic building from about 1911 that was turned into a restaurant in 1993. I do know that at the very beginning of the building’s life that there was a clock tower on the Colombo & Brougham Street corner of the building but that was removed I think in the 1940’s.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Later, whilst running errands we pass the building again and the awful feeling I had is confirmed, it’s in the process of being demolished.

After our visit to the Sydenham Bakery just down the road I get Himself to pull over so that I can take photos of the demolition process. It’s a sad moment, but unlike many of the heritage buildings in the city I at least get the chance to catch a glimpse of the building’s former glory and say a quiet goodbye.

When I’m next in Christchurch again so many of these beautiful historical remnants will already be long gone, replaced with new builds or still just gaps in the urban landscape, with only the ghostly images of their existence  imprinted in the memories of those who knew them well.

I can only liken this experience to attending a funeral… gone is the moment when the individual can be saved, all you can do now is to morn the passing,  remember the beauty and the good times and say the necessary goodbyes in your heart.

I picked up a small piece of rubble that was within finger’s reach inside the wire safety fence and put it in my pocket. It’s now residing in a little jar at home in the Netherlands … a little non-descript  lump to most, but with a strange sentimental value to me, a tiny connection to the past I once knew.

I’m lucky to be here today, it’s clear from the speed of the work that everything will be gone very soon and I almost missed it. There are quite a lot of photos, but this is a once chance photographic opportunity only,  the place is quite literally disappearing by the minute.

The building might be soon gone but I can only hope that the memory will live on and that a new heritage might be built that later generations can also fall in love with and treasure.  Old Sydenham Post Office… R.I.P.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

July 14, 2012

Did I Hear that You Spotted Some Heavy Machinery?

Filed under: Kids and Family,LIFE,NEW ZEALAND,PHOTOGRAPHY,Travel — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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This photo post today started out exclusively for Little Mr.

Whilst on the road we’ve been subjected a few times to the sound of a six year old boy’s excited screams of delight , excitement and delirium whenever heavy machinery is spotted (the experience is ear shattering, believe me). The bigger the heavy machinery, the higher and more prolonged the volume emitted from said child. If any future hearing test reveals impairment I could in all likelihood have (amongst others)  these machines to blame.

If I get really deaf in my later years and Little Mr. gets sick of yelling at me to put my hearing aids in, I’ll be able to pull up this post,  turn the tables, telling him that his childhood scarred me for life and by the way I need him to do a few chores for me please. (Hmmm …Wonder what my chances of pulling that one off are LOL?!)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 10, 2012

The Old Post Office, Regent Theatre …and the Clarendon Façade Doesn’t get a Third Chance…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Today’s post takes us into Christchurch’s Catherdral Square itself… the barriers are in the centre of the central open space of the Square as work is being done on a multitude of buildings close by.

To my amazment the Old Post Ofice building is still standing!

It hasn’t been a Post Office for years now… more recently it became a visitors centre and Starbucks and I have no idea if it is still structurally sound, or repairable if it has sustained damage, …but it’s a relief to see it here at all at this point.

A little further along the Regent Theatre building is now a sad vacant space… CERA have posted a few “then and now” posters on the fences, not for every building we can see, but for a few.

I remember well going to the “pictures” at the Regent during my years in Christchurch and the building too was a beauty inside and out that was much admired and will be sadly missed.

Further down this end of Worcester street that bends around the square and goes towards Oxford Terrace there are several other buildings that I’d like to know more about.

As a kid, I knew the building that’s now called the “Rydges Hotel” by it’s ‘old days” former name of “Noah’s Hotel” ..it sits on the northern side of the Oxford/Worcester corner. I have no idea what shape it’s in now.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

On the Oxford/Worcester south side corner stands the Clarendon Tower.

It’s a stange building because it was formerly the Clarendon Hotel, a grand three storey stone building that dated from around 1903.

Then, very contrivertically in the 1980’s they decided to make a tower block out of it and were going to knock down the hotel completely, but in the end they kept the origonal facade and them “grew” another 15 or so stories of modern building out of the top of it.

It was, and still is, the most bizzare juxtaposition of buildings I have ever seen and not quite a marriage made in heaven.

Yes, I was in the “camp” that said, “better some of it saved to live on in this bizzre fashion than all of it lost completely”,  but I still thought  “What were they thinking?” every time I passed it.

Wiki has more detail about it’s history and photos, here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clarendon_Tower .

Since the rest of Worcester Street and Oxford Terrace are still cordoned off, I can only see the “town side” of the Clarendon and not the facade that can be more clearly seen from Oxford Terrace. The tower looks forelorn with it’s plywood panels covering  the broken windows.

I can’t see but am also wondering about the (Robert Falcon) Scott memorial statue (of South Pole fame) that sat on the grass on the river side opposite the Clarendon Tower, apparently it toppled in the February quake and was damaged…

…it’s a very special statue because it’s strikingly white in colour instead of the oft prefered bronze and because it was carved to an amazingly professional standard by none other than Scott’s widow, in memory of her husband and his efforts to reach the Pole.

Once again I’ve tried to use Google Street View to give you an idea of what these places were like before. The CERA  information leaflets were flapping around in the wind, so a passing walker volunteers to hold it whilst I take photos. (Thank you Lady, that was sweet of you)… or in Kiwi slang … “Sweet !!”.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Thanks to Google Street View)

(photograph © Thanks to Google Street View)

(photograph © Thanks to Google Street View)

(photograph © Thanks to Google Street View)

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