Local Heart, Global Soul

January 31, 2014

A Very Palatial Art Exhibition…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Another post detailing our travels and adventures during the summer of 2012.

Regular readers will know that as usual we are packing in as many new experiences as we can manage… new places, new sights, cultural and culinary experiences, what’s not to like?

For privacy reasons I never advertise on my blog when I’m away from home…

…and of course sorting the thousands of photographs I take and then doing research for various topics afterwards takes time so I have to confess I currently have at least two years worth of blog material on my hard drive.

I hope you settle into your most comfortable chair and join me for the journey ahead.

Although I try and make the annual sculpture exhibition in the Lange Voorhout every year, it  isn’t  actually the only reason I have bought our visiting friend “Velvetine” to  this address. She doesn’t know it yet, but there is a building at the corner of this “L” shaped street  that is my next surprise destination for her.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I’ve just called this address a “building” but in fact it’s rather more than that: it’s an art gallery that’s housed in a former Palace, one that was once upon a time  the winter palace home to  the Queen Mother Emma of the Netherlands.

The exhibition we have come to see is one that’s on permanent display, and for good reason: this is Lange Voorhour 74,  home of  Maurits Cornelis Escher, also known as M.C. Escher collection, called “Escher in Het Paleis” (Escher in the Palace).

Now it’s time to take a detailed look at more of this work and find out more about the man, and Queen Mother Emma’s former winter Palace that the collection of his works is housed in.

I’ll start with a few of the details of the rooms themselves: naturally since this is now primarily a public art gallery most of the furniture has been removed, but in places they have projected old photographic images onto the walls to show what the room looked like in days gone by.

I previously wrote about wanting to visit this exhibition:  https://kiwidutch.wordpress.com/2011/08/03/new-462/  and Escher also featured on my blog when he was one of the chosen artists who had works displayed as a detailed sandcastle  piece here:  https://kiwidutch.wordpress.com/2011/02/14/new-304/.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

escher outside inside 2l (Small)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

http://www.escherinhetpaleis.nl/

April 1, 2013

Kneuterdijk Palace… of Kings and State…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Whilst Himself and I were courting,  I rented a  room in the very upmarket neighbourhood of the Statenkwartier (ok, if I’m completely honest it was a garret box-room of a room, above the fourth floor under the roof eves, rather cold in winter and boiling hot in summer).

However it was a tiny space of my own and good enough to start off with.

Every working day I would take the tram into the centre of the city and on the way would pass a beautiful building on Kneuterdijk 20–22.

Wikipedia and the Raad van State website tell me:

Kneuterdijk Palace, located in the Hague, was once a Royal Palace of the Kings of the Netherlands.

Built in 1716 in the Louis XIV style, by architect Daniel Marot, it was first home to the Count of Wassenaar-Obdam.  

The palace served as a residence for King William II and his wife princess Anna Paulowna of Russia in the first half of the 19th century, when he was still the crown prince.

Their grandson crown prince William used the palace from 1858 till his death in 1879. In the 1930s the place was occasionally used by Princess Juliana.

After World War II Dutch war criminals were tried in the great hall, some of whom were sentenced to death. Then the Ministry of Finance used the building for many years. Since restoration work was completed in 2001 the palace has been in use by the Netherlands Council of State (Raad van State). 

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Raad van State is a constitutionally established advisory body to the government which consists of members of the royal family and Crown-appointed members generally having political, commercial, diplomatic, or military experience.

The Council of State must be consulted by the cabinet on proposed legislation before a law is submitted to the parliament.

The Council of State is an independent adviser to the government on legislation and administration and general highest administrative court in the country.

When I went to take photos of the building I noticed a plaque on the side of the wall around the corner that translated reads  “King Willem 2nd and his advisers discussed decisively changes to The Netherlands constitution in this house 1847.

It’s a landmark building in The Hague and I’m pleased to now know more about it…

I continue  to admire it’s classical beauty every time I pass it by.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kneuterdijk_Palace

http://www.raadvanstate.nl/over-de-raad-van-state.html

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Blog at WordPress.com.