Local Heart, Global Soul

June 21, 2018

Another Trip, This Time Southwards And Home…

The time has come to leave Wainuiomata behind us. I have had a rest, Himself took our hosts and their extended family members on what turned out to be a six hour car ride to see the hill with the longest place name in the world. The name is: ‘Taumata­whakatangihanga­koauau­o­tamatea­turi­pukakapiki­maunga­horo­nuku­pokai­whenua­kitanatahu” and I have a link to that post from our last visit below. It was a tiring day for our friend with cancer but he hadn’t actually felt up to any substantial outing for months and months so he was equally excited about enjoying a day out and tired upon their return. Little Mr and I decided to stay home and have a “chill” day, I needed a rest after several busy days and walking in the Petone Settlers museum the day before. I also knew we needed to leave shortly for the trip back to Christchurch and I would have my fill of car journeys. Now we say some misty eyed goodbyes and head back over the hill towards Wellington for the last time this trip. At least the rain has passed by and it’s a glorious day.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

https://kiwidutch.wordpress.com/2012/03/20/new-649/
Truly a Mouthful for The Guinness Book of Records…

June 20, 2018

Bridging The Christmas Lights…

Filed under: NEW ZEALAND,PHOTOGRAPHY,Wellington & Region — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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One thing I like to see is technology being used for decorative uses. Spotted during our Christmas 2017 trip to New Zealand when we went north to visit friends in Wainuiomata, travelling back from the center of Wellington. This area in Petone where you branch off the motorway leading to the Hutt valley, these bridge lights have a central panel in them that can be turned into red, blue and green Christmas lights. It certainly brightened up the night.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 19, 2018

A Hidden Trail…

Another familiar sight directly before entering Wainuiomata is a footbridge over the main road. This is located near the brow of the hill before the road drops down into the valley. Between Christmas and New Year of 2017, after several days of rain, Kiwi Daughter suggested to Himself that they make a long walk from here to get some fresh air and exercise. Close to the foot bridge is an area where you can park, so they parked the car there and took a small trail that runs parallel to the road but is cut off from it by a screen of bushes and trees.  After a decent walk down they looped back to the car and then came home again. It’s a reminder that New Zealand holds a myriad of trails, long and short in even the most built up of places.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

View heading in towards Wainuiomata…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

View from the other direction…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The parking area…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

View from the top, looking over Petone and the Hutt Valley…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Zoomed in shot of the hill taken from Wellington… (across the harbour)…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 18, 2018

Receiving A Very Large Dish…

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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Whenever we are visiting New Zealand we try to visit our friends in Wellington, especially now that one of our friends has cancer. Even if we are tired after a long drive to Picton, a three and a half hour ferry crossing and then the drive up the Hutt Valley, we know that we have almost reached Wainuiomata when we see a familiar landmark. It’s a very large satellite dish and it sits near the edge of Petone just before we head up the hill to Wainuiomata. I have no clue if it has a specific purpose and with technology ever changing I have no idea how long it will remain here, for us at least it’s always a welcome sight, especially on that first journey.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 17, 2018

Little Houses On The Hillside…

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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The overriding images that I have of Wellington boil down to two things: the iconic form of the Beehive (Parliament building) and of houses dotted around the hills. Here are a small selection:

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 16, 2018

Arty Waves And Windy Views…

There is more to the Petone Settlers Museum but I could of course not cover every item. Himself and I left the building and investigated the waterfront directly outside. I wanted to get some “arty” wave photographs, so this is a photographic post of a lovely (and on this day, very windy) part of Petone and its portion of Wellington Harbour.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 15, 2018

Not Quite A Certificate Of Truth…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I mentioned a few posts ago that the Centennial celebrations that took place in New Zealand in 1940 were heavily balanced in favour of Pākehā (white) settlers who had more or less comfortable lives, land, jobs and social mobility.

Maori on the other hand, had less access to higher education, social, economic, and financial opportunities so the sweeping statements that generalized the ideal that everything was rosy in paradise was far from the truth, Ugly truths were swept under the carpet and a bright smile was exhibited for the outside world.

There is no point in pretending that all was wonderful in New Zealand in the 1940’s but it’s also an ideal that was the product of its time, and I hope that we have come a long, long way from that situation in 2018.

Purely from an artistic point of view I was attracted to this document, a “New Zealand Centennial Exhibition, Certificate of Attendance November 1939.” which was on display at the Petone Settlers Museum when Himself and I visited just after Christmas in 2017.

I like the mixture of western and Māori motifs and the central figure that reminds me a little bit of the female figure from the Colombia Pictures Film company logo.

In 1940 New Zealand was of course still heavily bonded with “Mother England” so the cape-like flags that fall either side of the figure feature even a fraction more of the Union Jack than they do of the New Zealand flag.

The illustration is very much of its time, but it is the inclusion of the Māori and very “New Zealand” motifs around the border and illustrated within the central panel of the certificate that I like the most.

I’m also struck that it’s a very “official” looking document for something seemingly as mundane as an entry ticket, especially when I read the accompanying information: “The jewel in the centennial crown was the New Zealand Centennial Exhibition. Running from 8 November 1939 to 4 May 1940, it sprawled over 55 acres of land in Rongotai, Wellington. 2.5 million visitors came to the event, at a time when New Zealand’s population was only 1.6 million people.

Obviously with 55 acres the physical size of the exhibition meant that it could not be covered completely in one day, so many people probably did half one day and the other half in subsequent days, helping to tot up such massive admission numbers.

With rumblings of war in Europe, the mood of patriotism was probably very high at the time as well as many New Zealand young men prepared to fight for “Queen and Country”. Who knows, many of those young men may well have come to Wellington to join ships sailing for Europe and visited the centennial Exhibition before departure. It’s an interesting piece of art, which if you think deeper about it represented in fact many lies told at the time to both Māori and Pākehā, many of which sacrificed their lives for “Mother England” within a very short time of this Exhibition.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petone_Settlers_Museum
Wikipedia / Petone Settlers Museum / History / New Zealand

June 14, 2018

Flying The Flag… Or ?

Filed under: NEW ZEALAND,Petone: Settlers Museum,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

New Zealanders recently had a referendum concerning a possible change to the national flag. Thousands of public and commercial entries were whittled down to roughly forty and from that a panel selected several for official consideration. I personally thought that all of the “selected” offerings were completely hideous and during our Christmas 2017 / New Year 2018 visit to New Zealand, discovered that everyone I know thought exactly the same.

The referendum was mainly about the issue of the union jack remaining on a flag that no longer has the previously strong ties to Britain.
The biggest obstacle that I can make out is that even people with staunch republican leanings view Queen Elizabeth (as a person) with a strong measure of respect, even if they are not at all in agreement with having a monarchy.

The feeling seems to be that a change of flag would be welcomed, but only after the Queen passes away. The timing was wrong and everyone wanted a better selection of flags to replace the current one so the referendum to change it was a mega-costly exercise that was pretty much doomed to fail from the outset.

I knew from my school history classes that the current flag was not the first one New Zealand had had, but was too disinterested at the time to take note of which had been it’s predecessor.

During our visit to the Petone Settlers Museum, in the area outside Wellington, I found out what that predecessor had been, and why.

The Information board tells me: “United Tribes of New Zealand Flag”, “This flag was known as the Flag of the United Tribes of New Zealand. In 1834, a group of northern Māori chiefs chose this flag and declared it the national flag of New Zealand.

At that time New Zealand was not yet a British colony and New Zealand built ships could not sail under a British flag.

Without a flag to represent a nation, trading ships and their valuable cargos would be seized, and Sydney (Australia) an important trading port, would not let ships in without a flag. The solution was this flag, and it became known as New Zealand’s first national flag.

Following the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi on 6 February 1840, the Union Jack replaced the Flag of the United Tribes of New Zealand as the official flag.

The New Zealand Company continued to fly the United Tribes’ flag until an army was dispatched to lower the flag and hoist the Union jack in its place in June 1840. The flag here is a reproduction based on a sketch chosen by a gathering of Maori chiefs at Waitangi on 20 March 1834.

The New Zealand Company created an incorrect version of this flag with six-pointed stars instead of eight-pointed stars and flew out on the “Tory” on the voyage to New Zealand from England; it was probably based on an incomplete description published in the New South Wales Gazette in 1835. There were also some mistakenly made with white borders (instead of black) and roughly drawn stars.”

Hmm, it seems we have a history of messing up our national flag, let’s hope that we get it right one day.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petone_Settlers_Museum
Wikipedia / Petone Settlers Museum / History / New Zealand

June 13, 2018

The New Zealand Company…

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Himself and I are continuing our visit of the Petone Settlers Museum (just after Christmas 2017) Now we come around to some local history where we learn: “The arrival of the New Zealand Company.

William and Edward Gibbon Wakefield were English brothers and land speculators.

Without having seen New Zealand they declared it the country of the future.

They aimed to establish a “new model English society” while making a tidy profit.

The New Zealand Company was eager to acquire New Zealand land before the British Government made it a colony.

Of the 18,000 British migrants who came to New Zealand between 1840 and 1852, 14,000 were New Zealand Company settlers.

‘The Tory’. A sailor named Roger Carter made this model of the “Tory”. In 1839, the “Tory” sailed into Port Nicholson with it’s crew and 35 passengers, including William Wakefield. The “Tory” was “a very fine and fast 382 ton” three-masted barque, armed with eight guns. It was captained by Edmund Chaffers from the British Royal Navy and was regarded as a particularly trim craft, with fine lines and exceptional sailing qualities. One interesting feature was its figurehead, a large reproduction of the Duke of Wellington.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

101 Blankets for a harbour.

August 1838. The New Zealand Land Company is formed by the Wakefield Brothers along with other members of the English gentry (renamed New Zealand Company in December 1839).

12 May 1839 William Wakefield leaves for New Zealand on board the “Tory”.

20 September 1939 Wakefield arrives at Pito-one (Petone) beach.

23 September 1839 Te Atiawa chiefs board the “Tory” to inspect items offered in exchange for land.

27 September 1839 16 chiefs and their sons sign the Port Nicolson (Wellington Harbour) deed of purchase, selling the land to the New Zealand Company.

29 April 1940 Treaty of Waitangi is signed by 39 chiefs at Port Nicholson.

21 May 1840 Lieutenant-Governor William Hobson proclaims British sovereignty over New Zealand.

January 1841 Lawyer William Spain appointed Land Claims Commissioner to investigate the Port Nicholson land purchase.

May 1842 Hearing begins into the Port Nicholson land purchase.

12 September 1843 Report by William Spain declares that most of Port Nicholson was not validly purchased by the New Zealand Company.

“I ask you Pākehā (white people)… Did [the Queen] say to you “go to New Zealand and fraudulently take away the land of the natives”? You say no, then why do you encroach upon land that has not been fairly purchased? (Wiremu Tako Ngatata, 1843, Evidence given during the Port Nicholson land purchase hearing.)

Colonel Wakefield agrees to pay £1,500 compensation to Māori for 67,000 acres of the Port Nicholson block. The New Zealand Company wanted to purchase land as cheaply as possible from Māori and sell it on to “gentleman settlers”.

Edward Wakefield also believed that colonisation would solve poverty and crime in Britain and that, here in New Zealand, he would create a “better England”.

The New Zealand Company believed they had purchased all the land between Wellington’s south coast and the Tararua Ranges, the islands in the harbour and part of inland Porirua – approximately 160,000 acres.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

What did te Atiawa want? “We want to live in peace and have white people come amongst us.

We want our children to have protectors in Europeans… we will sell our land and harbour and live with white men.

(Te Puni, chief Pito-one Pa, 1839)- Te Puni and te Wharepouri, two chiefs prominent in signing the deal were looking for safety for their people.

What did Te Atiawa think that they has sold? “I thought that there would be perhaps nine or ten Pākehā … but I see that each ship holds two hundred and I believe more [are] coming” (Chief te Wharepouri, 1840)

Māori believed that they would retain use of their villages, cultivation and burial grounds, as well as one tenth of the overall land.

As well, Māori had a different understanding of land ownership than the English. Did all of Te Atiawa agree? “What will you say when you have parted with all of the land? What will you say when many white people come here and drive you all away into the mountains?” (Puakawa, chief of Waiwhetu Pa, 1939) The debate lasted for an entire day, but finally every chief signed the sale agreement.’

Many (often smaller, and certainly more peaceful) Māori tribes were being decimated in civil warfare after the introduction of the gun, all that had been wanted here in Petone was protection from these new Māori wars and this is why they signed their land away. It’s without doubt that even with the intervention of the Land Claims Commissioner, New Zealand Māori did not get a fair deal because they simply did not understand the terms of the sale, the intended use of the land or the implications for their families. In todays terms it would be understood that a “deal” where the balance of power was so uneven should not be valid but these were times when indigenous peoples around the world were scarcely given a thought, and in fact the New Zealand deals were seen as enlightened because the ‘natives” were paid and not herded onto reservations as happened elsewhere in the world. This is why large scale repatriations have been made since the 1980’s and the country is learning to move on without this thorn in its side.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petone_Settlers_Museum
Wikipedia / Petone Settlers Museum / History / New Zealand

June 12, 2018

Connecting People, Times And Places…

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Following yesterday’s post from the Petone Settler’s Museum that detailed the revival of Maori language, here there is also a section about the Maori culture in the region. I learn:

“Memories of us. This is a community display where Petone-ites invite each other to share their nearest and dearest objects for a month. Whatever your age, some objects hold more meaning than others because they are personal, connecting to people, times and places.

Social history museums are concerned with two things: objects and their people. Our collections tend to be a portal to the distant past.

What are the objects that remind you of who you once were, where you’ve been and what you’ve done? What are the objects of today that people of tomorrow will understand us by? What should we be collecting from now? Please share your thoughts with us.”

“Carved Pou representing Te Puni. This carving honours Chief Te Puni. It was carved by Jock McEwen and several prisoners from Rimutaka Prison as part of a carving class at the former Petone Technical institute in 1986.

It was subsequently gifted to the Petone Borough. “Te Atiawa o runga te rangi, te toki te tangatanga i te ra” (Te Atiawa are like an axe whose fastenings cannon be loosened by the sun” – Whakataukī / Proverb).

At the time of the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, the iwi (tribes) living in Wellington Harbour area came from the Taranaki region of the North Island. The collective name given to these iwi is “Taranaki Whānui ki Te Upoko o Te Ika (Taranaki Whānui).

Their occupation of the land gives them rights and duties of mana whenua ~ guardians of the harbour and surrounding land. Te Atiawa, one of the iwi of Taranaki Whānui, has a special connection to Petone. we pay tribute to their history and acknowledge them as custodians. This section introduces two significant chiefs of Te Atiawa: Honiana Te Puni-kokopu (known as Te Puni) and his cousin, Te Wharepouri.”

There is a lot more information about land settlement, disputes between tribes and white settlers, iwi movements around the region and finally settlement in Petone. It’s probably a little too long for a blog post but when visiting in person it is extremely informative. This is the kind of thing that really teaches me something and helps me to connect to the threads of Māori culture that are part of the living history of all New Zealanders.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Carved Pou representing Te Puni…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petone_Settlers_Museum
Wikipedia / Petone Settlers Museum / History / New Zealand

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