Local Heart, Global Soul

March 18, 2019

Pigs Might Not Fly But Apparently Dogs Did…

Family Kiwidutch see this building often, some good friends live nearby and it’s just a short distance from my physiotherapists practice. The other side of it used to have a large sign similar to the one on the door, for “Tekkel Air” (Tekkel means: Dachshund,  a.k.a. Sausage Dog, Airline) and this was a Travel  Agency.  Recently I think that the building changed owners, all of the signs have been removed and it’s now just another period building amongst many in the area. The pictures of the little dog and the fact that there seemed to be an airline named after a Dachshund also made me smile. I don’t even know if such an airline ever existed… maybe like this building it was wonderful in it’s time but has now been painted out into obscurity.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

December 30, 2010

Kid Cooking made Easy… “Pigs in Blankets”

Filed under: FOOD — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , , , , , ,

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Kiwi Daughter: currently aged nine years of age, often expresses interest in cooking.

I’d like to think that it’s all due to the Maternal Influence in this household… that she has seen my passion for food, my deep love of cooking, of entertaining and feeding people.

Sadly more critical inspection reveals that the most likely cause of her motivation consists of her attempting over indulgence of her rampant sweet tooth, since about 95% of her chosen recipes involve chocolate or icing as an ingredient… or even more preferably, if she can manage it…. both.

Because of this I have been trying hard to show her that cooking savory items can also be satisfying and since she has recently discovered that she likes puff pastry, she asked if she could make something for lunch that included pastry.

I am not able to stand on two feet at the moment and the combination of crutches, an oven, a nine year old helper and a minuscule galley kitchen meant that I needed to think of something easy, whereby Himself could take care of the oven and assist in the easiest preparation possible.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Thus the brainwave… smoked sasuages wrapped in pastry, a.k.a. “pigs in blankets”.

Dutch pastry of the commercial variety comes in small frozen packages of ten little square sheets, approximately 10 cm square (about 4 inches square).

Here in The Netherlands we do have soft sasuages in cans, called ” knackworstjes“. They come in regular length and in mini form and I think that the mini sized ones translate to the little sasuages that are called “cocktail franks” in North America.
Our version of these have soft side and no real skins and would quickly go mushy in the oven, so I used a different sort of knackworst that has a firmer skin and just sliced them into thirds to make them the right length.

All Kiwi Daughter needed next were a few sheets of pre-prepared puff pastry.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Ingredients:
Frankfurters
Several sheets Puff pastry
Milk (optional)
Mustard (optional)
Ketchup (optional)

Method:
Preheat your oven to 225 C (440 F)
Take a thawed sheet of ready rolled puff pastry and roll up your Frankfurter pieces.
Use a small dab of water to seal the join of the pastry, and place the pieces join side down onto a baking tray.
Brush with milk ( if you want a more golden coloured pastry).
Bake for about 12- 15 minutes or until the pastry, puffs up, is cooked and golden in colour.
Serve with mustard or ketchup if you wish.

Et Viola!, Himself was the Master Controller of the Oven and hot trays, Kiwi Daughter did the cutting of the sasuages and the rolling up of the pastry, she achieved a simple tasty lunch with minimum effort and adult input and she’s pleased as punch with the results.

hmmm… I foresee a looming addition to puff pastry, so dear Daughter, no you can’t have these every day this week, there are other savoury school-holiday lunch recipes at our disposal too… we will cover many of them in due course.

Meantime, my Compliments to my budding chef and her sous-chef helper: Himself… by the time my foot is mended I might have a fight on my hands to wrestle back my kitchen LOL!

November 18, 2010

Do YOU Drool Over it’s Taste or it’s Photogenic Qualities?

Filed under: PORTUGAL — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The Portuguese are famous for their Chorizo sasuages. Himself loves Chorizo, but I prefer lean meat so find them a bit too fatty for my liking.

I like Chorizo, and any sausage similar once in a while but not too often.

Wikipedia gives a good description of Chorizo: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chorizo

“Chorizo: Galician: chourizo, Portuguese: chouriço, Catalan: xoriço (“ʃuˈɾisu”)  is a term encompassing several types of pork sasuage originating from the Iberian Peninsula.

Chorizo can be a fresh sausage, in which case it must be cooked before eating. In Europe it is more frequently a fermented cured smoked sausage, in which case it is usually sliced and eaten without cooking.

Spanish chorizo and Portuguese chouriço get their distinctive smokiness and deep red color from dried smoked red peppers (pimentón/pimentão or colorau).

Due to culinary tradition, and the expense of imported Spanish smoked paprika, Mexican chorizo (and chorizo throughout Latin America) is usually made with chile peppers, which are used abundantly in Mexican cuisine.

In Latin America, vinegar also tends to be used instead of the white wine usually used in Spain. In Spain and Portugal the sausages are usually encased in intestines, in a traditional method that has been used since Roman times.

In Latin America, however, they are usually encased in artificial casings, have a smooth commercial appearance, and artificial colorings are often used.

Chorizo can be eaten as is (sliced or in a sandwich), barbecued, fried or simmered in apple cider or other strong alcoholic beverage such asaguardiente. It also can be used as a partial replacement for ground beef or pork.”

At the medieval market there are stalls with all sorts of Chorizo sasuage  for sale… Himself is drooling at the thought of their taste, I’m drooling more at their photogenic qualities…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Each to his/her own… drool on…

December 9, 2009

Ingredient Confusion: Chipolata Cake? …you are kidding, aren’t you?

Filed under: FOOD,PHOTOGRAPHY,Recipe Confusion — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , , , , ,

(photo © kiwidutch)

When I’m sitting with my New Zealand family and someone mentions that they need to remember to bring chipolata’s to a BBQ pot-luck or meal, then it’s taken as fact that they will be bringing sasuages, to be more specific:  long slender sasuages that BBQ or fry up rather nicely and are very popular with adults and children alike.

No problem right? “Chipolata’s” originated in Italy and their name  cames from the Italian word “cipolla’  for “onion”, (one of the main ingredients that the original Chipolata’s contained.)

These sausages are well known all over the world so how on earth can there be any confusion at all?
Hummm.. all I have to do to produce  ingredient confusion here, is to tell people that I’m bringing Chipolata Cake or Chipolata Pudding to the family feast.

Ugh… a cake or pudding with sasuages in it? surely not! That doesn’t even begin to sound appetizing in any way shape or form.

(photo © kiwidutch)

Luckily one section of my family would not have batted an eyelid…  Why? because they know that fortunately there is a tastier explanation.
They know that the Chipolata Pudding and Chipolata Cake available in The Netherlands has absolutely nothing to do with sausages!
 
So, Chipolata Cake.. I kid you not !
 
In the Netherlands,  Chipolata Cake is a layered sponge with fruit and cream, topped with icing and available at many a Birthday Party.
It’s quite an old fashioned Dutch cake and comes in various shapes and sizes around the country, sometimes round, sometimes rectangular, it appears that some Bakeries have their own specialty decoration, ( but the inside layers and filling remain the same)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

Chipolata  Pudding is a very old and traditional pudding, again with fruit (raisins) and a creamy foamy texture.
Me. I like the cake and am not too fussed on the pudding, Himself on the other hand, likes the pudding better than the cake.

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

(photo © kiwidutch)

I have a copy of the recipe courtesy of a Baker’s Forum ( in the Dutch language only) and I’ve  “parked” the recipe here so that I can find it back if I want to make this later when I’m in New Zealand.  If anyone else would like to make it in the meantime, and needs it in english, please just post a comment and I’ll make a translation.

Chipolata Taart

Voor een lekkere chipolatavulling ga je uit van een stevige banketbakkersroom:
1/4 liter melk
2 eidooiers
50 gram suiker
25 gram bloem.
vannillesmaak.
De bloem met een klein deel van de melk,suiker,vanille en eidooiers roeren tot een glad papje en dit zachtjes en roerend gaar koken in de rest van de melk.
Laat deze room goed afkoelen en stuif er wat poedersuiker over(dit voorkomt een vel) deze bb room, liefst een dag tevoren maken.

Klop een 1/4 ltr.slagroom met 35gr.suiker luchtig en spatel deze door de even losgeroerde bb room en een scheut marasquinkikeur.

En spatel er dan stukjes in marasquin gedrenkte bitterkoekjes en wat rozijnen ook geweld in likeur.

Voor de kleur kun je er nog wat in stukjes gehakte geconfijte/gekleurde kersen(bigarreaux)door doen en wat gehakte sinassnippers.

Chipolata Cake

The basis for a nice chipolata filling is a stiff pastry custard (Confectioner’s custard /Crème pâtissière, or French pastry cream)
1/4 litre of milk
2 egg yolks
50 grams of sugar
25 grams of flour
vanilla essence
To make the Confectioner’s custard: Stir the flour with a little bit of the milk, sugar, vanilla and egg yolks until it is smooth and boil this while stirring on a low element while adding the rest of the milk.(stir constantly!)
Let the custard cool down and add a little bit of icing sugar (this prevents skin on the custard). It is recommended to make this pastry cream one day in advance.

Lightly beat 1/4 litre of cream together with 35 grams of sugar and mix it with the whipped custard and a dash of marasquin liquor. (“Liqueur de Marasquin” in French is Maraschino Liqueur, a dry liqueur. / but Marasquin cherry liqueur”, in English, is a sweet liqueur with a pronounced cherry taste made from cherry pits.)

Next ladle the pieces of bitter macaroons (bitterkoekjes = A bitter biscuit is a biscuit consisting of a mixture of ground bitter almonds, crystal sugar and protein.) drenched in marasquin and some raisins soaked in liquor.

Top cake with a thin layer of marzipan .

For a nice colour you could add some pieces of candied/coloured cherries (bigarreaux) and some cut orange peel.

(photo © kiwidutch)

So, next time someone mentions “Chipolata Cake” or Chipolata Pudding” .. or if you make one yourself, let yourself into a lovely Dutch secret and surprise people  who might find  that “sasuage” pudding might not be what they assumed  after all!

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