Local Heart, Global Soul

May 24, 2016

Your Face Is Set In Stone, Your Hair In A Permanent Wave…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

In the Portrait room there are more than portraits in painted form, there  are also ones carved in marble too.

These busts are of prominent people of the time, and the detail not just in the faces but also in the texture of the hair, hands and cloth around them is nothing short of stunning.

It’s amazing that even the veins on the hands are so intricately carved, and such realism achieved.
Portrait of  Johannes Munter” Carrara marble, Amsterdam 1673, attributed to Bartholomeus Eggers (1637- before 1692)
Bartholomeus Eggers was one of the young sculptors trained by Artus Quellinus in his Amsterdam workshop.

Eggers’ portrait of Mayor Johannes Munter is still strongly influenced by his teacher’s style. However, the sculptor introduced a playful motif: Munter plays with the tassels of his collar with his left hand, subtly subverting the formal character of the bust.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Portrait of Gerard Schaep van Cortenhoeff” Carrara marble, attributed to Bartholomeus Eggers (1637- before 1692)
Gerard Schaep was one of the many conservative Calvinists among the Amsterdam regents. He was held in high esteem for his many years of public service: elected mayor a total of eleven times and served as the Republic’s envoy extraordinary to Denmark and Sweden. This lofty status warranted a monumental bust portrait in marble.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Amsterdam: Rijksmuseum

June 23, 2015

The Curves In Wood And Stone: Happiness For The Soul…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Continuing from yesterday’s post, I’m learning more about the St Peter and St Paul’s church in Kranenburg, Germany.

We didn’t go inside, but Wikipedia (link at bottom of this post) tells us:

“The gradual decline in the number of pilgrims prevented the completion of the original church plan.

A large-scale ambulatory was not built and the tower remained unfinished as a stand stub, increased only at the beginning of the First World War with the current tower.After centuries of neglect, the church was fully renovated at the end of the 19th century.

The war winter of 1944-1945 brought great devastation to the roofs, vaults and walls.
The reconstruction in 1949 and 1970 took bought the church closely back to it’s original condition.

The high altar dates from around 1900. The large upper altar wings however, date back to 1563 and some of the images from the 15th century.
The altar cross is from a 16th century Antwerp altarpiece. During the Second World War, the shrine and the painted wings were destroyed but the altar rosette was able to be reconstructed because most of the images were recovered.

The Maria altar is a work of art from the workshop of Ferdinand Langenberg and dates from the early 20th century.
Many of the sculptures and paintings have been preserved. Particularly noteworthy: an image of St. Christopher from the first half of the 16th century, and an altar table with the representation of Calvary from around 1430.

The western bay of the nave contains a hexagonal font from 1448, richly decorated with tracery.
The church has three bells. The big bell from 1474 was cast by Geert van Wou. De Maria Bell was cast in 1644, the youngest in 1959. Valuable ivory works were sold in the early 20th century and gone to New York and Münster.” As usual I’m interested in the detail of the building, in especially in the doors and larger archways, there is plenty of that.

The carvings on the curved sections are amazing and one wooden door the tracery of vines captivates my arty brain.The careful workings of these flowing images both in wood and stone are so very tactile and irresistible. I get a great sense of satisfaction every time I see things like this… in fact it’s more than just satisfaction, it’s a happiness in my soul.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The Roman Catholic Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul / Petrus en Pauluskerk (Kranenburg)

October 12, 2014

Unexpected Views Of The Stunning Stones…

Filed under: ENGLAND,PHOTOGRAPHY,Salisbury,South Coast,Stonehenge — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , ,
(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Often in life you have  picture in your minds eye about how something will look, it’s not necessarily a mental image based on fact, but rather just an idea that you get planted into your brain for no particular reason and it sits there as “fact” until reality comes along and  either confirms your idea or blows it out of the water.

Such was the later when we took a camper-van along the English south coast last summer.

We had driven through Salisbury and then out into rural countryside and were on a busy highway when all of a sudden we rounded a corner and low and behold, there on the crest of a small rise opposite us were the world famous stones of Stonehenge themselves.

I was even able to zoom in on them as the road curved and we marvelled as the early morning light picked out details, even from far away.

I had always assumed that the world famous monument was somewhere remote, far from things like normal highways, and I also thought that if it was a historical attraction, then surely that would mean it would have some sort of barrier around it.  Yes there are fences, but no massive screens or the barriers that I had imagined.

We had deliberately set out early this morning, Stonehenge is somewhere I have always wanted to visit, but we hate still crowds so my condition of coming here was that we would be here when the gates opened in the morning because even one or two hours later, the place would be invaded by the masses.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Although you get a surprise viewing of Stonehenge from the main highway, the actual entrance to it is further up the road and off a side road, so we followed the signs and were there a short while later.

The parking attendant wanted us to park the camper right at the end of the field, but allowed us to park up right by the main gate when I mentioned that I was on crutches and that a shorter walk would be greatly appreciated.

There is an upper car parking area that’s utterly empty which we would have liked to have used, but it was explained that that’s for tour bus companies and not for private vehicles.

There is already a small crowd by the entrance patiently waiting for the gates to open and we only had to wait a few minutes before we could go in.

Once past the ticket area there are microphone packs that we can use to tell us all about the stones, and then a tunnel takes you onwards so that you leave the entrance area behind and emerge out by the stones  with no real sight of the entrance or parking area. The effect is magical, it heightens the effect of the stones, their size and imposing presence.  So far, even though I am walking slowly, there are only a few people scattered around in front of us, so we can take our time and spend time looking at this amazing piece of architecture.

There is a sign that says: “The great and ancient stone circle at Stonehenge is unique stone circle of Stonehenge is unique: an exceptional survival from a prehistoric culture now lost to us. The monument evolved between 3,000 BC and 1,600 BC and is aligned with the rising and setting of the sun at the solstices, but it exact purpose remains a mystery. To this day Stonehenge endures as a source of inspiration and fascination and, for many, a place of worship and celebration.”

The sign is right, this place is spiritual…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

March 23, 2014

Seeing What’s In, On And Around The Windows… Doors and Walls…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

One of the things that always piques my curiosity when looking at old  buildings is the seemingly “standard” practice of the architects of centuries past to infuse their designs with tiny details that are extra to the overall design of the building.

Sometimes these additions are decorative roof  touches, patterns in the brickwork,  window adornments, stone carved details, tiles or plaques.

I often find that new, modern building are completely devoid of embellishment, they are rarely tactile and for me are the equivalent of a visual desert, compared with the packed rainforest of detail that exists in their centuries old counterparts.

Sometimes the details are stashed away like tiny treasures, waiting to be noticed and enjoyed only by a very observant few, but in general you don’t have to look too hard, there is plenty of “building bling” on show  so you can quickly spot the embellishments that give these buildings  additional character and  charm.

Back in the summer of 2012 I was walking around central Delft with my visiting Singaporean friend “Velvetine”. As usual  since she also loves architectural detail, old historic stuff and photography we have our respective cameras in hand and are kept busy by the sheer abundance of possible shots.  I will admit that a few extra photographs crept into this post: flowers, window ornaments and the like, but they are detail too so hey, why not?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

October 1, 2013

The Detail Of The Outside Draws Attention…

When we came into visit Canterbury Cathedral in Canterbury, Kent, England, I took photographs of the outside in order to gauge the massive size and beautiful shapes of the building. Now before we leave the grounds I’m concentrating on the finer details found in the window shapes and the nooks and crannies of the Cathedral. Let’s take a look around…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

September 28, 2013

Velvetine And I Both Suffer From Pattern Disease…

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

Regular readers of my blog will know that I’m a detail fanatic.

Here in Canterbury Cathedral, in Canterbury, Kent, England there is enough detail to keep me happy for a very long time.

I assumed that it was only me who would ooh and ahhh over patterns in stone, but I’m delighted to find that my good friend Velvetine suffers from this  “detail disease” just as badly as I do. We egg each other on and probably look totally mad to other visitors, but we simply didn’t care, we just revelled in the opportunity to takes a zillion photographs of the things we love looking at. Himself really doesn’t understand this fascination, and to him one bit of stone is  much like any other… he has the attitude “seen one statue, seen ’em all”…. but Velvetine and I know better.

Again, a lot of these photos are for my artistic reference files… they inspire me and I have a long term design idea what I’m busy planning in my head but haven’t quite figured out how I can make work on paper yet.Fear not, I’m almost done with this sort of post… we will be back on the road shortly.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

September 27, 2013

Natural Greenery … Still Beautiful In Grey…

Another page of my last summer’s diary detailing a visit to Canterbury Cathedral, in Canterbury, Kent, England. Although the structure we are in is of course made of stone, there are still natural forms  to be found. They appear as leaves, wreathes and vines and they are everywhere. I’m not talking about real plants however, these too are carved into the stones all around us.  This post is as much for my artistic inspiration archive as it is for my general viewing pleasure… I love the flowing forms, the three dimensional aspects so skilfully achieved and the different styles. Enjoy!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

September 26, 2013

People Fade Into History, But Their Footsteps Remain…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Another page in my last summer’s diary as I tour Canterbury Cathedral in Canterbury, Kent, England with my Singaporean friend “Velvetine”.

She and I are kindred spirits when it comes to appreciating the visual arts. We both adore carved stone or wood, stained glass and ironwork, and appreciate the history of the pieces and the skill of the craftsmen who made them.

In this post we were both photographing different aspects of ironwork we found and some of the motifs in the floor…  a flight of stairs caught our attention because you think of stone being hard and indestructible and yet  it’s no match for nine hundred years of human footfall, wearing  the stone into distinctive patterns.

Negotiating these steps on crutches was one of the hardest parts of the day, but fortunately Velvetine was on hand to help with a steady hand and I wasn’t trying to do these in a hurry.

Ironwork in the form of some decorative gates and railings catch Velvetine’s eye and camera lens, whilst I found some different metalwork to put into the frame.Then there are the patterns in the floor, some of them very old by the look of them…  just goes to show that there is more than enough to see here, from the views high up to the views literally under your feet.

Between these beautiful patterns and the stone staircase it just goes to show: generations of people may have long faded into history, but in some strange way their footprints remain.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

September 25, 2013

The Art of Hiding Something In Plain Sight… The Trick Is Knowing Where To Look.

Filed under: ART,Canterbury Cathedral,ENGLAND,Funny — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , , , ,
(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

It’s considered completely normal for artists to sign their work and many have gone a step further and quietly incorporated their own self portraits into one of the members of a crowd scene, but it’s usually harder to to find a signature on a stonemasons work.

I heard once that often there would be the practice of leaving a signature, or a particular identifying mark or initials in the base of a statue or on the backside of a wall carved piece of stone.

But here in Canterbury Cathedral, in Canterbury Kent, England, one stone mason in 1908 went a step further and left his initials right on the front of the commemorative plaque he had worked on.

Naturally, probably knowing that the person paying the bill for the stone would appreciate this rather less, he decided to be discrete about it and so neatly inscribed his initials “JLL” and the date “1908” in millimetre high letters within the letter “G” of the word “Wynberg” third row up from the bottom. The position of the plaque and available light help hide the evidence too…  and make photographing it difficult. It really blends into the colour of the stone.

The sneaky trick of “hiding something in plain sight” was never more true than here… his initials are literally on the front page, but only visible to those in the know. Second class vandalism or a masterful and cheeky  first class artistic licence? You decide.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

 

 

 

September 23, 2013

I’m Probably Reading Too Much Into It, But I Think The Last One Is Hiding Something…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

In continuation of yesterday’s post, I’m visiting Canterbury Cathedral in Canterbury, Kent, England and busy admiring the beautiful figures carved in stone all around me.

Yesterday’s post was about the mortals in stone, this post reaches a little further and is all about the angels.

The expressions on their faces are all very different, they range from the infant cherubs type to the more adult sort and come in both realistic and very stylised forms.

One poor angel is in desperate need of restoration, and is clearly praying for a new nose and a few extra fingers please.

Some are playful, some are serious, a little group of three appear to be sleeping, and one at the base of a large stone plague is definitely not amused (but probably you’d be rather cheesed off too if you had a plaque resting on you head).

Another group of five, all in a row, hold shields with various emblems on them, but it’s a different one, also with a shield that hangs from a gallery that impresses me the most. This one manages to look not just contented but mischievous and full of character at the same time. This is the kind of angel that you could imagine has a secret catapult hidden behind that shield. Had there been a sudden ping and a pea whistling past my ear once my back was turned I would not have been at all surprised.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

…and is this one really a little angel?….

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

http://www.canterbury-cathedral.org/visit/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canterbury_Cathedral

Next Page »

Blog at WordPress.com.