Local Heart, Global Soul

April 5, 2018

A Few “Pointers” To Find South…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The last information board I’m looking at in the top station of the Christchurch Gondola is all about the Southern Cross.

It’s a bright group of stars that all Kiwi’s learn to identify at a young age, and it’s important enough to be on both the New Zealand and Australian flags.

I was lucky to have a teacher at school who’s hobby was astronomy. I think that every kid who passed through his classes got, like us, extensive lessons on stars, field trips to local observatories and on occasion when some of the big planets were visible, night classes in the park where he would have his astronomy friends and their huge telescopes in the middle of the field, delighting kids and their parents with amazing real-time images of planets that we had only seen in books previous to that.

I not only remember it fondly, I would go so far as to say it was one of the highlights of my time at school.

Since many Kiwi kids of my era grew up “tramping” (the New Zealand term for “hiking”) in their holidays, this teacher was keen that we should all be able to navigate by the stars, so taught us how to find due South. Here at the Gondola there is also a guide to the same… so a lot of memories came flooding back when I saw this. The information board reads:

The Southern Cross. The Southern Cross is a group of stars always visible in the southern hemisphere. It consists of four bright stars in the shape of a cross and a fainter start located just below the cross bar. Although there are a number of start crosses in the night sky, the Southern Cross is the most prominent. It is able to be identified by two very bight starts called “The Pointers” that point towards the top of the cross.
How to find South. While the position of the Southern Cross changes in the night, there are various ways to use the cross to find South.
One of the more accurate methods is to:

(1) Extend a line joining the pointers. Midway along this line extend another line at a right angle to it.

(2) Extend a further line from the long axis of the Southern Cross.

(3) Where the two lines meet drop a vertical line to the horizon. This is South.

The Southern Cross is a national icon, appearing on the New Zealand flag. The Maori believed it was an anchor of a great sky canoe, while other tribes thought it was an opening in the sky that the wind blew through.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

July 29, 2013

Getting Up To Monkey Business at the Grand…

Filed under: ENGLAND,Folkestone,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , , , , ,
(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Another page from my last’s summer’s diary, where we are talking our Singaporean friend (we will call her here by her internet nickname“Velvetinenut” for internet privacy reasons) on some European adventures.

We’ve met up with friends in Folkestone and one of them is showing us the sights. After attempting to see France from the cliff tops here, we now turn our attention to the other massive chunk of man-made scenery behind us, the majestic form of Folkestone’s Grand Hotel. Our host suggests we go inside so that we can get a cold drink, so we get to see the inside of this beautiful building as well.

Velvetine requests a large glass of water and is a little surprised find that they take this very literally, serving her a pint glass full of iced water.

The Grand Hotel sits just a short distance from the former Metropole Hotel and together they make an impressive pair. If you like architectural detail, and character buildings you’d be most happy to stare at these buildings for a very long time.
Maybe it’s just me but I find this views just as enchanting as the grand views of the cliffs on both sides of the channel (that we could have seen this day if only the sea mist would clear)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“When The Grand was built just over 100 years ago, it incorporated many novel features which have since become the norm but it had a rival: the Metropole…

At the time Folkestone was one of the most fashionable and prosperous coastal resorts and The Metropole, which standing immediately next door, had just been constructed. A local builder who had been disappointed not to secure the building contract became determined to build a rival establishment which was better in every way.

The builder, Daniel Baker, was in the forefront of innovative design;  he had already developed the use of cavity wall ties, and went one better with The Grand – waterproof cavity wall insulation.   He used a steel frame – one of the first – to give the large clear spans to the main reception rooms, and – said to be a world first – infilled it with reinforced concrete.   And he used suspended ceilings for improved soundproofing. Not only was he innovative, but also he was able to utilise new techniques to excellent effect. The steel frame allowed his formative use of curtain walling, resulting in the windows covering almost the entire width of the elevations to make the most of the sunny location and the fabulous views and a by-product of the concrete floors was one of the first examples of wall-to-wall carpeting.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The place to be – The building was constructed as gentlemen’s residential chambers, and immediately established a reputation as the place to be and be seen. The King, Edward VII, became a frequent visitor, so much so that the locals would wander along The Leas in front of the building peering into the glasshouse to catch a glimpse of him;  apparently because he and his friends were heavily bearded, it became likened to looking at monkeys in a cage, hence the sobriquet “Monkey House”.

The King came not only with the Queen but also his intimate friend Alice Keppel, an hour-glass blue eyed beauty the epitome of elegance, lively wit and discretion, popularising the expression “monkey business” and his favoured three piece suits are still known as monkey suits in America.

A drink problem – Although the area now known as Keppels was then surrounded by an earth bank to keep out prying eyes, which Mrs Keppel’s great grand-daughter the Duchess of Cornwall might appreciate, this was more to do with the absence of a drinks licence!

When the local landowner, the Earl of Radnor, granted the lease for the building of The Metropole, he accepted a condition that he would not allow another hotel to be built within 600 yards.

Hostilities commenced even before the laying of bricks, and became so acrimonious that Lord Radnor and Daniel Baker fenced off The Leas to prevent Metropole patrons gaining access!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

A solution – To overcome the liquor problem, patrons’ requirements were summoned from the local purveyors by telephone, and a lad would deliver them by bicycle! A subterranean cavern was excavated below Keppels accessed by hidden stairs to secrete customers’ own supplies, incorporating another new invention – refrigeration.

Another solution And to further assist discrete communication, a telephone box – in rustic style – was installed outside on The Leas, said to be yet another world first.
The chef, M Dutru, came from the Savoy, and the manager, Gustav Gelardi, from the Walsingham, both friends of the King. A descendant of the latter’s family, another Gelardi, is now manager of the Lanesborough.

In 1909 the King opened the new ballroom containing the first sprung dance floor in Europe. The first dance he took with the Queen, and the second with Mrs Keppel. A medal was struck to commemorate the event, and the King allowed the royal coat of arms to be used to publicise the establishment.

During the Great War the building was used as a refuge for the Belgian royal family and military hospital; thereafter the Prince of Wales’s patronage, later Edward VIII, assisted its resurgence, although Mrs Simpson stayed a little way away. Ward Lock’s guide described The Leas outside the front door as indisputably the finest marine promenade in the world.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Robert Morley made his stage debut here, as did Michael Caine – not a lot of people know that! Albert Sandler started the Palm Court Orchestra in the Monkey House, but all were driven away from Frontline Folkestone by the fall of France. The building was badly damaged by shelling from the French coast.
In the 50s it was Princess Margaret’s turn, and Agatha Christie, who had been writing Murder on the Orient Express at the time she stayed in one of the suites before the war, still came regularly. But by the 60s rail travel was being supplanted by air to more distant climes for the beau monde, and rent controls were such that the sale of leases of the apartments became the favoured option.

With the ending of rent controls and the vast improvement in communications in the wake of the Channel Tunnel, the apartments are again being let; but whereas they cost two guineas a day in 1903 – probably equivalent to £200 today – some can now be had for a week or more for under £200.

Once again – enjoyment for all To complement this, the unrivalled public rooms have been restored; Keppels, at one time decked out as the Seventies Disco, has had its years of accretions stripped away, and once more exudes its Edwardian ambience as an intimate bar/bistro.
The Palm Court alias the Monkey House has acquired a tented ceiling, a magical array of plants illuminated by over 5000 lights at night, and fine food and service to match, and the adjacent oak paneled Tudor Room has a bar, sumptuous sofas and a collection of massive old oil paintings catalogued as part of the national archive.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 13, 2012

Sad News about the “Press”…the Last Corner(stone) of the Square…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I’ve almost finished my walking tour of Christchurch city centre…

I’ve been here close to two hours now, talking my time,  adsorbing the scenes and getting used to the rawness of the situation around me.

This area has been hard to photograph, we can’t get close, there are  many empty spaces, there is not a great line of sight.

The furthest corner away from us is the north eastern corner, where the beautiful Christchurch Press Newspaper used to stand.

The Christchurch Press is the ‘institution” of Christchurch newspapers, it’s been keeping the inhabitants of Christchurch, Canterbury and the South Island up to date with News since the first issue appeared in 1851.

In 1909 the paper moved into it’s new building in Cathedral Square and from then on as the decades passed, it’s only cemented it’s place as an iconic Christchurch building and a newspaper institution.

I regret never having taken a decent photo of the building because I always admired it, but fortunately other people did, because I found this stunning image on Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Christchurch_Press_Building_-_as_it_once_was.jpg

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Now all that remains is an empty space, the paper itself lives on and I think they are working out of new premesis close to the airport.

One worker lost their life in the Press Building in the September 22nd 2011 quake, so it’s with mixed emotions that I view the old photo, I adore Heritage buildings and would love to save them whenever possible, but never at the cost of anyones life, that’s for me at least, too high a price to pay.

I look around this last corner of the Square… Warner’s Hotel used to be next door and was just as well known as the Press building but as I stand behind fences some distance away it’s now really hard to see what’s gone and what’s there and if it’s there, for how much longer.

I’m delighted to see that the War Memorial appears to have escaped unscathed, this has always been a favourite of mine, and I find myself smiling at the little Police station… it’s been a stock feature of the Square for decades and it’s reassuringly familiar.

From this corner of the Square comes the constant clatter of demolition noises, the fire engine is on hand to spray water and keep the dust down: there are noises of diggers and jackhammers. I made a small video clip but YouTube is being a bit weird about uploading stuff at the moment so I will add that on another day after I’ve summonded some technical assistance.

I’m almost ready to leave the Square… This little piece of “home” will never be the same, …emotions have been more than I expected, but then too, so has the scale of the damage. Just as it’s time to move on in a physical sense it’s time to move on in an emotional one too.

Easier said than done but you need to start somewhere. I wonder what the future holds for this piece of real-estate ? Someone has poked a little bouquet of flowers into the fence… they’ve long since wilted but the sentiment of eerie sadness that they exude is all around us.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The war memorial…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Little Police kiosk…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Little Mr. doesn’t quite get why there needs to be an engine if there is no fire?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Seemingly unscathed artwork (I love it too) on the other side of the Square…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Quake-scaped lamp-post from a different angle…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

BEFORE photos to compare… (white building in centre currently being demolished)…

(photograph © Thanks to Google Street View)

(photograph © Thanks to Google Street View)

(photograph © Thanks to Google Street View)

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