Local Heart, Global Soul

December 10, 2018

New Farm, When Urban Gardening Reaches New Heights…

There is a new revolution going on around the world, where people are trying to cut down on the “food miles”  generated by the food we eat. By this it is meant the number of miles/kilometres that are between where there food is produced and where it is consumed. This means things cutting down on food transport wherever possible. This has meant the development of Urban gardens, and The Hague is no different. An old office building has been partly converted to become a place where fresh vegetables are grown and the name of this enterprise is “The New Farm.” Amazingly the farm produces not just tomatoes and peppers but also herbs and fish! I went with friends to take a look two summers ago, and also, of course to buy some local vegetables.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 12, 2012

To The Toughest Graffiti Artists in the World… Respect.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

When disaster strikes and the situation is clearly too big for local specialist teams to handle on their own, it’s nice to have friends in other countries who are willing to come and lend a hand.

They have the necessary specialist training, they swing into action, loading  their gear onto planes and come as quickly as they can.

In the case of Christchurch on February 22nd 2011, USAR (Urban Search and Rescue) teams were needed from abroad.

New Zealand has six USAR  teams and they were already busy working around the clock looking for survivers in buildings that totally or partlally collapsed and checking buildings for people who might be trapped in specific places of damage, but six teams was clearly not going to be enough as the scale of the damage became apparent.

As the news of the earthquake rippled around the world, offers of assistace rippled back and were gratefully accepted, they arrived with urgency from around the globe and set to work.

They left behind the graffitti of their trade, an international shorthand that shows times, dates of inspections and other stuff like squares inside circles that I assume mean things too…

…maybe they put a square when they go into search and circle it afterwards to show they are safely out in case another aftershock hits whilst they are inside?

I’m just guessing because I don’t know… but whatever it is it makes sense to them and that’s what matters.

Japan sent USAR teams to assist in Christchurch too and two of the New Zealand teams had the sad job of returning the favour only two weeks later when a 9 magnitude quake and resulting tsunami hit the south eastern coast of Japan on 11th March 2011.

No doubt they recognised only too well the emotion that must inevitably be there when you have to do this job on home soil.

Considering that the aftershocks keep coming to the tune of about 30-40 a day after a “big one” , this is not a job for the feint-hearted.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

In this line of work USAR teams  must surely see evidence of people and remains of people in building wreckage that must be a human-beings worst nightmere, but finding a survivor must also be one of the most amazing feelings in the world.

They are teams of  unsung heroes who’s work is deeply appreciated, and not applauded nearly enough.

Their graffiti leaves me with mixed feelings…

…sad to see it on one hand at all, but releived on the other that there are dedicated people who transverse the world to assist when someones darkest hour is upon them and  speed is of the essence.

I wish there was no need for their job, but sadly Mother Nature is a living creature of sorts and when she coughs our puny structures tremble and break.

It’s a reality we just have to live with on planet earth. This post is dedicated  to this group of individuals, those who came and helped … and all like them around the world.

To all USAR… Respect…and Bravo

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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