Local Heart, Global Soul

October 6, 2019

Not Sure If I Would Ever Drink To That…

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY,Quirky Design — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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Earlier this year Himself and I had dinner with one of Himself’s colleagues, an Armenian lady and her sons. The two boys are adults and help out in her business. so after telephone conversations, texts and emails, it’s nice for them all to put faces to the voices. The Armenian lady bought out a bottle of wine. It wasn’t the wine that was particularly interesting here but rather the label on the bottle. The wine is from Georgia, Armenia’s northern neighbour.  An the unexpected portrait on the front of the bottle?: Stalin!

I always assumed that Stalin was Russian, but in fact he was from Georgia. Although responsible for some of the greatest mass murders of all time, Stalin is still revered by a small percentage of people and his home town lives on the hype of the man (which keeps the local museum open etc.).  Thanks to Hmself for that infomation! Stalin did however murder thousands of Georgians as well as Russians, so there is no love lost for their most notorious countryman in many a Georgian household. Here, this wine celebrates him, but I have to say that it’s weird to see Stalin’s image on a bottle, for me it’s compromible with finding Hitler’s image on a wine bottle… downright creepy.

No, we didn’t open it, this is a special bottlle in the collection of our hostess. There is a little bit of text on the label in English, which reads:” KINDZARAULI”, “Kindzmarauli”  half-sweet, red wine. It is made from Saperavi sort grapes cultivated in  Kvareli district, Kakheti region. The wine has dark red colour and pleasant aroma, It has been produced since 1942.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

October 22, 2015

The Japanese Wine Berry: Sorry No Wine, But A Beautiful Berry…

Filed under: FOOD,PHOTOGRAPHY,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

As a foodie you learn something new all the time. This summer I discovered a fruit that was totally new to me: it’s called the Japanese Wine-berry.

Early in the season the plant produced strange looking clusters with bud-like protrusions sprouting out all around it. I’d never seen anything like it and didn’t have a clue what to expect this to turn in to.

Late in the summer I went back and saw how this had changed: each of the bud-like pieces now sported what looks like a mini-raspberry. Like raspberries they can be easily removed from their place, as long as care is taken not to squash the fruit in the process.

The taste is somewhat similar to that of a raspberry but definitely not as sweet, in fact there is a faint hint of tartness about it, so it would be a prefect garnish or ingredient in a dessert that might otherwise be too sweet.

Himself isn’t a fan of sour things so I assumed he would probably say that these were not nearly sweet enough for him, but he surprised me, saying that he loved them. The tartness isn’t overpowering, it’s just there as a a sort of reduced sweetness. Needless to  say it’s hard to describe a new flavour in words.   They are easy to pick because the fruit tends to be more on the outside of the bush, but that said my container didn’t fill up very fast because they were so small in size. (approximately half the size of a raspberry) but it’s also possible that since I visited later in the season that the bigger ones had already been picked. I’d intended to make a pot of jam but the slow picking required more time and effort than I could put into standing so I revised the plan and left with about a cup and a half’s worth of berries which Himself and I shared in the sunshine.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

January 25, 2015

The Bottle That Couldn’t Face It’s Unmasking And Bottled It…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

At this stage of my archive posts, Family Kiwidutch are back at our accommodation  in  the Autenrieder Brauereigasthof hotel  located in Ichenhausen, and enjoying a slow “catch up morning”  where I rest up with every pillow in the family room under my foot to relieve my foot pain and Himself and the kids make good use of the hotel swimming pool.

They still want to go to Legoland again today but I will see if I end up going with them or not.

Himself had a drama by the car and is not in the best of moods, here is the tale of the sad saga: Himself likes very dark beers and nice wines (not together obviously) and loves nothing better than hunting down a locally made wine from each country we visit if that is at all possible.

Having spotted a little shop in Vaduz, the capital of Liechtenstein that looked like it sold bottled goods, he made a speedy detour and after a conversation in German came back triumphant with what he thought was an actual Liechtenstein wine (even though vineyards were not anywhere in evidence).

Mind you, in a tiny country a vineyard would be correspondingly tiny so seeing rows of vines is neither here nor there.

The downside was that the bottle had cost him Euro 25,–  an amount he would not usually consider paying for a general run of the mill dinner wine that only he would be drinking. (My strong pain medications ruling out any alcohol consumption in the last four and a half years).

He was so delighted that he had discovered a real “Liechtenstein wine” that he bit the bullet and paid up… bringing the bottle back to the car with a huge smile on his face.

Once back at our hotel, getting our stuff out of the car he looked closer at the bottle and gave an annoyed mutter about his expensive purchase: even if the label really made it look like it was a Liechtenstein wine, the fine print right at the bottom actually revealed it to be Austrian, so clearly not the rare find he thought had scored.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

He was annoyed that the shopkeeper hadn’t pointed out that it wasn’t really  a Liechtenstein wine when he must have known (but Himself did admit that there is a small possibility this might  also have been the fault of cross-purpose communication his part).   That said, Himself’s German is more than passable and so personally I’m inclined to think that the seller in this case took advantage of a tourist customer in a hurry to get rid of a more expensive stock.

In a fit of pique and to save on carrying unnecessary luggage back and forth to our room, Himself left the offending full bottle of wine in the boot of the car where he tried hard to put it out of mind whilst he simmered down over it’s price tag.

He was in the back seat making space in our seven seater for the baggage a few days later, and with the boot open, and some of the extra seats folded down, pushed a large box of Lego over to fit in a suitcase, to be greeted by the sickening sound of breaking glass which then reminded him of where the Liechtenstein (a.k.a. Austrian) wine had been stashed.

He exited the car and went around to the rear where a red puddle of wine was on the concrete pavement along with a lot of broken glass. He managed to clear up the glass but of course the wine was well and truly lost and he came back to our room with a woeful tale of the accident and mutterings about Murphy’s Law that it had to be that expensive bottle that fell out of the boot of the car.

We (after he had simmered down) made jokes along the lines of “that wine knew it was less loved because it wasn’t a real Liechtenstein wine after all, so may have jumped rather than been pushed” or “maybe it knew that it’s taste wasn’t up to it’s Euro 25,– price tag so it did all it could not to have added insult to injury”.

It was a sore point for a while as he tried not to let the whole incident get him down but in the end he chalked it up to one of life’s experiences that you have to live and learn from.

The rest of the day went well, and I didn’t say a word when Himself opted for a beer instead of wine with that night’s dinner…

April 12, 2014

Not Water From Wine, But Renewal From Wine Warehouses…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Big cities all over the world are regularly faced with the dilemma of how to upgrade  former industrial areas.

In European cities that have grown substantially over the centuries, industries that were once on the outskirts of the city  now find themselves in prime residential and commercial  areas as the city and it’s population expands.

Inevitably the encroachment means that land prices rise and industrial use is not longer as profitable, transportation of industrial sized goods become difficult in now more densely populated areas and the industries start searching for cheaper land out of town where transport is easier and land prices are cheaper.

This eventually leaves old historical inner city areas run down or derelict and local councils have to decide between demolition or incorporating the old buildings into the regeneration project.

In the Bercy Village area in Paris, France there were long rows of wine warehouses that presented just such a problem  but luckily the solution found was to turn this into an artisan shopping area. The renovated warehouses now house cafés, restaurants and a large variety of shops, I will admit that it is rather touristy, but listening to the languages spoken as I walked past the outside tables of the eateries, it seems to be a popular place with locals too.

I like that some of the original features such as the railway line in the street have been kept, even if they have been filled in and are just symbolic.

The metro station is close by so I passed this every day at various times of day but took the photographs early on a Sunday morning when things were quiet and I could walk and take photos without the jostle and bustle of the crowds. I did try and take photos at other times but it was so busy the views were obscured.

On the Saturday I shopped there buying a long rainbow coloured ribbon on a stick (like the ones rhythmic gymnasts use)  for Kiwi Daughter to play with in the park and a wind-up torch for LittleMr. who was busy at home trying to waste as many batteries as possible with his obsession with torches at the time. Himself  scored some handmade chocolates and a bottle of the very alcoholic type.

The metro station is on the other side of the wine warehouses but instead of getting the business park and office worker commuters to walk around the long row of warehouses, one of the warehouse buildings was left empty, exits made in the back and is now a covered passageway that short-cuts though the line of buildings without changing the style, line or character of the buildings very much at all. It’s the kind of sympathetic solution to solve a practical problem whilst still keeping the history that I love. Ingenious!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

December 24, 2013

Eyeing Up The Beautiful Brews…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The 2013  Medieval Festival taking place in Vianden Castle in Luxembourg is in full swing.

Family Kiwidutch and visiting Singaporean friend “Velvetine” have arrived late to the party, but there is still time to take a look around and join in.In an inner courtyard there is an outdoor market taking place and naturally we stop at a few stalls that catch our eye.

I’m not drinking alcohol because of my  pain medication but even just the beautiful bottles containing the wines and liquors on this stall are appealing to the eye.

The vendors were friendly and chatty which was good because we had plenty of questions and Velvetine and Himself even managed several taste tests of some of the more unusual brews before deciding on a few purchases.

Velvetine loved the little toy hedgehogs at one stall, Little Mr coveted bows and arrows from another (“No”!) but gains a medieval knights vest that he can reuse at an upcoming school play. It was late afternoon and some of the stall owners were already packing up so we could have seen far more if we had been lucky enough to have arrived earlier. Still, you can’t have everything when you stumble upon things without planning.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

October 2, 2011

Dutch Wine… a Genuine Surprise on Many Levels.

Filed under: FOOD,LIFE,Reviews,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Oh Yes, yet another post inspired by my tens of thousands of archive photos. The silver lining on my current situation of limited mobility is that I have been able to use some of my recovery time sitting sorting out a lot of various photographs and in doing so I have rediscovered many a photo that I had simply forgotten about.

I especially wanted to post the photos of these bottles so that I could have an handy on-line reference and memory jogger for when we intended to visit this area of the Netherlands again, and  to spread the news of a “find” that very pleasantly surprised us whilst out on a day trip.

Himself  wanted to revisit one of the places he lived in as a child. His father had been a minister of the Church and was posted in various areas of the Netherlands during his working life so Himself and the rest of his siblings were  frequently (and oft reluctantly) uprooted from their childhood haunts as the family moved around.

One of Himself’s favourite homes had been in Zeeland, and so early one frosty winter’s Saturday morning a few years back we bundled the kids into the car and set out for a day trip to the island of Zuid Beverland in Zeeland.

After doing some touristy sightseeing, we stopped off at a little cafe place for lunch and I spotted a shelf that sported some locally made products. The  pots of chutney, jams and honey, along with a little selection of cheeses didn’t hold any surprises at all,  good solid general local fare.

But on the shelf was something that did surprise me…   …a local wine! (at this point this was the first and only Dutch wine I had ever seen,  In my ignorance I didn’t even think that the Dutch made wine at all!)

It also drew out the curiosity of Himself, so we bought a few bottles out of interest to see it would be like. Each bottle  cost +- Euro 6,–

As far as I can see, they used the same label for the main part of the bottles and switched around the top ( neck) label because that one denotes the variety of grape inside. Both are whites… (um, I wonder if many people actually notice that a grape of a red variety is illustrated on bottles of white wine? )

The first bottle is : Zuid Beveland Johanniter white.   The wine is soft and sweet, but not overpoweringly so  therefore even though I prefer red wine, I liked this white very much indeed.

Himself’s opinion: not a very outspoken wine, but for a Dutch wine it’s rather good and if we were in the area again I’d have no problem to buy it again.

The second bottle : Zuid Beverland Phoenix white.  We opened this one later and were delighted to find it to be just as good as the Johanniter bottle.

These wines have opened our eyes to the fact that there might be more of these interesting Dutch wines available  in the Netherlands. We have already decided that if we are in the Zuid Beverland again, we will come back to buy some more of these to stock up at home because they certainly didn’t  disappoint.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

September 10, 2011

Now THERE are Bottles You Wouldn’t Want to try and Finish in One Go!

Filed under: CAPE VERDE,LIFE,PHOTOGRAPHY,Travel — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

This is the  last post in my 2007 retro tour of the island of Sal in Cape Verde.

We would love to go back one day, but we share the problem of all but a seriously wealthy few: our travel list of places we want to see is too long and our travel savings pot too small, so  let’s see what the future brings on that score.

There are some shops that you pass when you travel and they grab your attention immediately with the presence of something out of the ordinary: this shop in Santa Maria was one of those.

Firstly, I had  heard of the word “grog” but in my due to my alcoholic ignorance, I assumed it was somehow either a made-up name for use in pirate stories and movies or a nickname for some other well known drink, say … gin or whisky.

I was partly correct,  the term “grog” is used in both New Zealand and Australia as a description of any strong alcohol, but  more accurately grog has it’s roots as a mixture of beer and rum  (Thank-you Wiki:    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grog)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I have to confess to being rather taken aback when we passed the open doorway of this small shop and saw on the counter close by, four  seriously large bottles of local Grog.

I estimate that each would  easily hold fifteen litres each (4 gallons) and it appears that it’s possible to buy grog from these bottles not only by a smaller bottle amount but also by the individual tipple.

The shop was tiny, but there were a selection of bottles on shelves and most appeared to be local grog brews, and most of the shop stock was made somewhere in one of the various Cape Verde islands.

We were surprised to see a few bottles of Cape Verdian wine as well as grog, so we bought one bottle of each to pack into our suitcases and take back to the Netherlands to sample at leisure.

The wine we enjoyed a few months later, it was definitely drinkable but nothing outstanding.

Himself  was the sole member of our household who partook of the grog, but he did share with some of our  friends who like that kind of thing and to all accounts it wasn’t bad at all!

Between them it certainly it didn’t take many weeks for the level of the bottle to drop well below the halfway point.

Cape Verde is a fabulous place, and I’d totally recomend it as a travel destination.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

April 2, 2011

“Acts One Two Three”… The Essence of Life, Fermented for a Lifetime.

Filed under: Blogging & Writing,LIFE — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

This post is a direct response to Invisible Mikey’s post here: http://invisiblemikey.wordpress.com/2011/03/23/act-three/#comment-2580 a well worthwhile and thought provoking read.

You know when something touches you deep inside, when thoughts whirl and you feel the urge to write a Column instead of a Comment.

It would be rude of me to take over Mikey’s blog with a comment so long, so here are the final pressings of thoughts that came to me from Mikey’s post. The principles that Mikey outlines are very true and for me they have a close  analogy to the making of wine.

So here goes:

Acts 1-3… Kiwidutch style: Essence of Life, Fermented for a Lifetime

Act One: First the  vine is planted and the vine grows,  only years later will the vine bear fruit.  The grapes produced will vary in colour, sweetness, size, and beauty.

Some before harvest will fall prey to winged predators, some will break off  the vine in high winds  or succome to  unexpected frosts, some will simply never form correctly and are never destined to ripen.

Who gets what is never fair and never equal.  It’s a lottery that sees some taken moments before their prime and some not even getting a chance to start life at all. Nature works that way, and expects each of us to make the best of whatever lot we have been given.

Problem is, at this infant stage we don’t know that yet.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Act Two: In the wine process is the pressing of the grapes, some of us got more squished in childhood and young adulthood than others. Some of us decided then and there, that we were pulp and live our lives accordingly, no goals, no expectations.

Some spend all their days lamenting the “not fair‘s”,  “if only’s” and the “might have been’s“.

What they don’t realise is that even the grape skins and pulp, whilst maybe never destined to be called “wine” still have the potential to become Grappa, Oruj, Tresterschnaps  or Pisco after their slow start.

In fact, just like these Liquors produced from less valued beginnings, these people often turn out to have greater hidden inner fortitude and strength.

Out of the pressings of childhood can some the sweet juice of Character that will determine what we are in the future… in our young lives we add the yeast of adventure and sometimes a young wine, too tightly capped, explodes the bottle.

Some of us in Act Two start with the advantage of stating out as sweet juice,  but let negativity invade  our life, we chose to stop at the hurdle in front of  us instead of  confronting it, and getting the guts to made the hard climb up and over life’s obstacles in our path.

Often we will blame others or situations for our inaction, or bad decisions looking for any excuses to relieve our  guilt of not going further in the process.

If this inaction continues for a long period of time, it eventually  inhibits the process so much that the cloudiness of this new wine is destined never to clear with age but usually turns to vinegar and these people turn out very bitter indeed.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Act Three: As wines we all start off as crushed together bits of nurture and environment  and started our independent lives with a less than clear start.

The ones who accept that life of all wines starts out murky, confused, indecisive and  ill defined,  learn that Life is less a few simple steps = result, but rather a process that slowly converts the youthful sugars of  character into the alcohol of wisdom, experience and knowledge .. so the bouquet of their life is the making of something beautiful.

This not only takes time but also patience, and as any home wine-maker knows, no wine can ever become drinkable unless the sediments are ‘racked off” periodically during the long fermentation and transformation process from cloudy beginnings to clear end product.

This ‘racking off” involves getting rid of old sediments, a letting go of old baggage as it were. Sometimes this happens slowly, but oft it is instead a major turning point in our lives that hastens the process of renewed maturity: marriage, children, responsibilities,  a sudden change in lifestyle, or a profound loss.

The racking off process is in itself a massive upheaval, emotional, physical, and sometimes entails great pain, but truly on the other side, after a time to settle and recover, a new clarity emerges that enables us to rejuvenate the process of turning more sugar of character  into  alcohol of  wisdom.

Some wish not to take part in the “racking off” process… they stay in their immature and cloudy state, wallowing in the dregs  of their life that they have should long  parted company from..

How we mature from there is up to us.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Some turn out  very well indeed despite initial low expectations,  high-priced high flyer’s can turn out to be mediocre with no depth and pleasure to impart, some are so dry that they suck the joy of the flavour out of your taste-buds, some are fresh and fruity as young things but give up and let the life run out of them with age.

Most plod on, knowing that some years of the process are better vintages than others… some bottles get lost along the way, carelessness,  pure accident or disaster, not all will complete the journey.

The “notes”  of Act Three that will eventually define us will be a mixture of our nature, upbringing and experiences.. spicy, aromatic, various woods and nuts, fruits,  some of us may turn out  full of bubbles, others not.

Our colours will be the every hue possible to our kind … but the colour matters not, nor the age or the fizz…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

…  what matters most is the taste and depth that has been formed over the passing days and years, deepening and evolving  as the temperature of good, bad, indifferent experiences, storage and how temperamentally we react to what happens around us.

Some grapes are seedless and will never have the possibility to bear fruit of their own.

Some, as wine will be appreciated and savored, and some swigged without thought.

Some will become treasures, collected and revered.

Some were destined to last for decades  but most of us are destined  for the shelf life thought fit and reasonable for the “average wine”.

How we store ourselves and react to the heat and frosts of life will often determine how drinkable we are as time goes on.  Do we impart pleasure in life’s wider circle?

Do we give back? Do we appreciate? … or are we only concerned with the selfish bubble and fizz of life, thinking that that’s whats important and that it will last forever.

The wine of  “you and me“, being homemade, will always have a little sediment at the bottom of the bottle at the very end of the process,  no-one in their right mind touches  that, it’s the private part of us that is the sum residue of our making.

If the bottle is handled with care,  it stays there, wisely undisturbed, untouched.

One day, when it is time, it too will be discarded when the bottle is finally empty and we are each ready for the ultimate recycling bin.

 

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

July 23, 2010

Domein Hof Te Dieren Wijngaard, A Dutch Vineyard…

Filed under: THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Summer in The Netherlands means a range of end-of-school-year activities, Social invitations, visitors and travel near and far around the city we live in.

Whilst delivering Kiwidutch daughter to a holiday event  in the Veluwe in the East of The Netherlands recently we stumbled upon several interesting places that we wanted to explore on the return trip.

This is how we came to be visiting the Domein Hof Te Dieren Wijngaard just outside the village of Dieren.

The Domein Hof Te Dieren building was first referenced in literature 1168, with an attached farm.

By 1647 it had evolved into it’s most well known structure, and the historic estate become a “jachtslot” (hunting castle) and was well used by Prince Willem II but in 1795 it burned down.

In 1822, it was rebuilt but burned down a second time in the closing years of World War II.

There has been subsequent talk of rebuilding it yet again but nothing has come of this plan to date.

Today this is the Netherlands largest walled vineyard, it’s total area of 3 hectares enclosed on three sides specifically built to provide a warmer climate.
The North and West winds are almost totally screened out and the wall gathers the warmth of the day and radiates it out at night.

The first grape harvest was in 2005. There are 10 organic grape varieties, 6 for wine and 4 for consumption.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

On set Sunday’s in the month, the vineyard hosts a market of locally made items… ( sadly we missed it by one day)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Cool coat hangers in the hallway..

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

And beautiful flower head by the entrance…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The vineyard also offers tours and wine tastings for groups up to 15 people.

We buy a bottle of red and a bottle of white to take home with us.  We’ve tried the red,  it’s a full fruity taste, but personally for us it has rather a too strong acidic after-taste. It’s drinkable but not one of the best wines we have ever had. Still, it was nice to have tried wine from a Dutch vineyard and to see what it’s like.

Domein Hof Te Dieren Wijngaard  // Youp en Riet Cretier  // Arnhemsestraatweg 16    // 6953AX  // Dieren   // Tel: 06  223 99 642    // Website: http://www.domeinhoftedieren.nl/index.htm (Dutch language only)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 19, 2010

A Singapore wine shop stop…

Filed under: SINGAPORE — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

We are doing a walking tour around part of Singapore with our Singaporean friend as our local guide.

It’s like walking around any big city in some respects but with the tropical heat and local scenes such as this gentleman cycling past us it’s also very different at the same time.

The bike looks a lit like a Dutch Bakfiets  https://kiwidutch.wordpress.com/2009/07/08/peddle-power-people-carriers-the-bakfiets/ or https://kiwidutch.wordpress.com/2009/07/22/another-cool-bakfiets/ but  this cargo bike has a very Asian  feel to it. (Might that be his lunch-box on the back?)

We come close to one of our friend’s favourite shops.

It’s a wine shop and she loves good wine, so we decide to get a bottle to take back to our hotel so that we adults can sit and relax in the room chatting with a glass after dinner once the kids are in bed.

Himself and I are intrigued to see what kind of wines are on offer here in Singapore and we also enjoy a glass of wine with a meal so we don’t take any persuading when offered to come inside and help with making the choice.

bakfiets (photo © kiwidutch)

There are several wines available for tasting and since none of us are burdened with driving we can all take part in the tasting session.

Himself and our friend like the Spanish red wine “Estio” best, but I find a firm favourite in the Queen’s Bay Cabernet Sauvignon from Chile.

That of course meant that we ended up buying a bottle of each to take back to the hotel.

They have a very good knowledge of wines here and a very nice selection too… ( apologies for the quality of the photos, it was quite dark inside the shop)

Our review of the wines: full, fruity, great flavour. Both are very good and although they are subtlety different, choosing a favourite is simply down to personal preference on taste.

…I’m very certain that we will be back here on future trips to pick up a wine to share together.

(photograph © kiwidutch)

(photograph © kiwidutch)

(photograph © kiwidutch)

(photograph © kiwidutch)

(photograph © kiwidutch)

(photograph © kiwidutch)

(photograph © kiwidutch)

(photograph © kiwidutch)

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